legal

DoJ tipped in plan to recommend Comcast-TWC merger block

DoJ tipped in plan to recommend Comcast-TWC merger block

Many have criticized the planned merger of Comcast and Time Warner, and for valid reasons. Now sources have cropped up to say that it might not happen after all, with the Department of Justice reportedly contemplating a recommendation to block the acquisition. Says the sources, there are concerns that such a merger between the two companies would be to the detriment of consumers. Furthermore, lawyers for the DoJ are said to be gathering evidence in support of a case to challenge the planned acquisition.

Continue Reading

SEC reportedly looking into LAUSD’s ‘iPads for schools’ program

SEC reportedly looking into LAUSD’s ‘iPads for schools’ program

On the heels of a report suggesting the Los Angeles School District (LAUSD) was trying to back out of a deal that brought iPads to every student in their system, the SEC has reportedly opened an informal inquiry on whether or not the money used for those iPads was within legal guidelines. The SEC is specifically interested in whether or not the LAUSD properly disclosed to investors how the bond money would be used, according to The Los Angeles Times.

Continue Reading

Whistleblowers’ lawyer: cops supplied infected hard drive

Whistleblowers’ lawyer: cops supplied infected hard drive

Attorney Matt Campbell is representing former and current law enforcement officers in a whistleblower case, and he reportedly discovered malware on an external hard drive supplied by the Fort Smith Police Department. Three officers, both former and current, are being represented by Campbell, and are said to have been wrongfully probed after reporting issues with overtime pay and wrongful termination within the police department. As part of his discovery request, Campbell supplied the police department with an external hard drive, and they were to load it with some documents in response. When it was returned, however, it included malware.

Continue Reading

Google’s EU case: three reasons why it matters to you

Google’s EU case: three reasons why it matters to you

The European Union is aiming for Google this month with a statement of objections. They've made allegations that Google isn't doing what they should when it comes to their super-dominant search engine. They suggest that what Google is doing with their search engine is selling products when they should simply be providing the public with this service without destroying their competition in the process. The European Union suggests that Google can keep doing what they're doing now - just so long as they're not found guilty of doing so in a way that allows no competition to realistically compete.

Continue Reading

EU files antitrust charge against Google for Search, Android

EU files antitrust charge against Google for Search, Android

As we expected, the European Commission has hit Google with an antitrust charge relating to search. Further, the EU is also insisting they’re going to look into Android. According to the complaint, the EU says Google is “systematically favoring its own comparison shopping product in its general search results pages”. Further, “the Commission's preliminary view is that such conduct infringes EU antitrust rules because it stifles competition and harms consumers”. Google has yet to comment, but an internal memo leaked yesterday suggests the company wholeheartedly disagrees with the EU’s stance.

Continue Reading

EU gearing up to formally accuse Google of antitrust violations

EU gearing up to formally accuse Google of antitrust violations

European regulators are ready to make a move and pounce on Google, formally accusing the search engine giant of violating European antitrust policies. E.U. regulators have been mulling over this case for a while now, and this new move will the the latest in a public threat to Googles business practices. At the heart of the antitrust case is Google's alleged use of its search engine to direct web users to its own products. Additionally, the E.U. investigation is looking into allegations that Google made it difficult for advertisers to move their ads to other platforms because Google was aggregating content from competitors in its search results.

Continue Reading

Forget spying, now the NSA wants your password list

Forget spying, now the NSA wants your password list

The NSA isn't interested in a sneaky back door into your smartphone or computer any more, it just wants you to leave the front door wide open. While arguments continue around just what the National Security Agency can and can't get access to - dragging more than one big tech name into the controversy - the spy organization's chief is suggesting a far more blunt approach: in effect, handing over the keys to encryption upfront.

Continue Reading

Net Neutrality under fire as big telcos start shouting

Net Neutrality under fire as big telcos start shouting

Net neutrality may have been settled by the FCC, but bang on time for the proposed rules being published a group of broadband bigwigs have fired back with a lawsuit. The Federal Communications Commission first revealed it wanted to classify the internet as a utility back in February, following that up with the 400 page rulebook that, among other things, outlined exactly what expectations users could have. Now, with those rules officially proposed, telecoms firms are firing back with all legal barrels.

Continue Reading

FAA grants AIG permission to do inspections with drones

FAA grants AIG permission to do inspections with drones

The FAA has held a tight fist around its drone permissions, and though some have been granted permission for specific activities, the number of permissions given have been relatively small. That doesn't mean the FAA won't grant permission when it sees a reason to, and latest to receive its grace is insurer AIG, which joins USAA and State Farm in the freedom to use drones for conducting inspections. As with past cases, however, there are limitations on how they can be used.

Continue Reading

Slew of copycat Kickstarters reported for DMCA infringement [Update]

Slew of copycat Kickstarters reported for DMCA infringement [Update]

Kickstarter is the place to go for crowdfunded projects, but from the multitudes of original content arise the occasional copycat productions, ripping off someone else's work. Kickstarter just issued its first transparency report which details all of the requests and claims in 2014 to take down campaigns. Out of the 22,252 68,668 projects submitted in 2014, 282 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) claims were made on a total of 240 Kickstarter projects. Surprisingly, the crowdfunding company only pursued actions against 44% of those reported projects.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next