legal

Jawbone sues Fitbit for ‘systematically plundering’ confidential data

Jawbone sues Fitbit for ‘systematically plundering’ confidential data

Fitbit's warm limelight has turned sour thanks to a lawsuit from competitor Jawbone, which has accused FitBit of "systematically plundering" its confidential data. How? According to the lawsuit, Fitbit has pilfered Jawbone's confidential details by snapping up former Jawbone employees who first downloaded confidential data they weren't supposed to have -- presumably, the thought process goes, taking that data with them to FitBit for its own gain. Such is the accusation, anyway.

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Oculus VR’s founder sued over alleged confidentiality breach

Oculus VR’s founder sued over alleged confidentiality breach

The founder of Oculus VR, Palmer Luckey, has been hit with a lawsuit from his former employer Total Recall Technologies. According to the lawsuit, Luckey used confidential information he acquired during his job at Total Recall to later launch his own Oculus Rift headset. As a result, Total Recall is seeking unspecified compensatory and punitive damages. Oculus has likewise been swept up into the lawsuit, but there are no statements from the company, which was acquired by Facebook, at this time.

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Lizard Squad teen admits guilt in 23 charges of swatting, harassment

Lizard Squad teen admits guilt in 23 charges of swatting, harassment

A 17-year-old in Canada plead guilty in court this week to 23 criminal charges of harassment, including swatting and extortion, mostly aimed at young women who played the online game League of Legends. The British Columbia resident describes himself as being a member of the hacking group Lizard Squad, and admitted to a number of swatting incidents that targeted victims in Tucson, Arizona and Florida, among other US cities.

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Court orders Popcorn Time websites be blocked by Israeli ISPs

Court orders Popcorn Time websites be blocked by Israeli ISPs

With its nickname of "Netflix for pirates," the app/service Popcorn Time has quickly become popular the world over among, well, internet pirates, and with new features like the ability to watch content in a web browser, media giants and copyright holders are quickly becoming concerned. Following a similar move in the UK last month, media companies in Israel have successfully petitioned a court to order the nation's internet service providers block all Popcorn Time websites.

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PayPal ordered to pay $25 million over deceptive practices

PayPal ordered to pay $25 million over deceptive practices

PayPal, used by online merchants and shoppers to send and process payments, has just settled a federal lawsuit from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) over alleged deceptive practices in its "Bill Me Later" program which is now known as PayPal Credit. PayPal will be returning $15 million to customers who lost money due to PayPal's practices, and a $10 million fine has been levied against PayPal, going towards the CFPB. After the settlement, PayPal will be required to correct its consumer disclosure policies, making them "clearly and prominently" displayed to consumers.

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Google and Apple urging Obama to keep smartphones secure

Google and Apple urging Obama to keep smartphones secure

Encrypted data on smartphones today make it difficult for law enforcement around the world to decipher data on smartphones that needs to be used in investigations. The difficulty for the technology industry is that the vast majority of smartphone users aren’t breaking the law in any way and want their personal data to be secure. At the same time law enforcement officials like FBI Director James B. Comey (pictured) are concerned that the growth of encrypted technologies is hindering law enforcement agencies during investigations.

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Google reprimanded for YouTube Kids app showing inappropriate content

Google reprimanded for YouTube Kids app showing inappropriate content

Google's recent mobile app, YouTube Kids, a version of the popular video service that curates safe content for young children, has come under fire from two child and consumer advocacy groups claiming that the app is deceiving. The Center for Digital Democracy and the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood filed a complaint with the FTC, stating that "the app is rife with videos that would not meet anyone’s definition of 'family friendly.'" The complaint included evidence of video clips that had been found on YouTube Kids that were described as disturbing and/or harmful to young children.

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Apple’s Samsung damages cut by $382m after “rounded corners” appeal

Apple’s Samsung damages cut by $382m after “rounded corners” appeal

Apple's $930m win against Samsung in 2012 faces a slash of more than 40-percent, after an appeals court ruled that the things like rectangles with rounded corners couldn't be protected. The closely-watched court case eventually decided three years ago that not only had Samsung infringed on iPhone patents, it had infringed "trade dress" too, effectively damaging its unique brand in the process. Now, though, the latter part of that ruling is being called into question, and it's worth $382m.

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CRISPR-Cas9 modifies your DNA, under legal fire

CRISPR-Cas9 modifies your DNA, under legal fire

A revolutionary method of editing the human genome has this week become the subject of a patent war. Back in April of 2014, patents were awarded by the USPTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office) to the Broad Institutes’ Dr. Feng Zhang, MIT, and Harvard to develop the technology behind "CRISPR-Cas9". This April, the UC Board of Regents’ legal team spoke with the USPTO about reconsidering their action, suggesting they award the patent to the inventor of the original method, UC Berkeley’s Jennifer Doudna. One way or another, this radical DNA modifier must be made.

We need X-Men, after all.

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Apple stops RadioShack’s customer data sale

Apple stops RadioShack’s customer data sale

As part of RadioShack long-expected collapse and bankruptcy filing, the company recently completed an auction of the data from some 117 million customers. The court-supervised sale was held in order to raise money to pay off $1.3 billion in debt, and the hedge fund Standard General came away as the highest bidder, paying $26.2 million for the RadioShack name and customer data. An interesting filing was made by Apple, however, which argued that customer data from the sales of its own products should not be resold.

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