lawsuit

Supreme Court declines to Google’s appeal in Oracle copyright suit

Supreme Court declines to Google’s appeal in Oracle copyright suit

The United States Supreme court rejected an appeal from Google after it lost a copyright infringement case against Oracle. The case originally dates back to 2010. It was then that Oracle Corp., the software company behind Java, alleged that Google's Android OS infringed on copyrighted Java APIs (application programming interfaces). In 2012, a district court found the case in favor of Google, but, in May of last year, the judge's ruling was overturned when an appeals court ruled in favor of Oracle. As the U.S. Supreme Court has backed off, this could be the ruling that stands, holding that API's can be copyrighted.

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Time Warner Cable about to be hit with first net neutrality lawsuit

Time Warner Cable about to be hit with first net neutrality lawsuit

In addition to Time Warner Cable maintaining its reputation as one of the U.S.'s most-hated ISPs, it looks like the company is about to become the first face a lawsuit for violating the FCC's new net neutrality rules. The update rules went into effect roughly a week ago, and now the Washington Post is reporting that one company is preparing to sue TWC for charging them with much higher rates in order to avoid throttled speeds — basically, holding its internet traffic for ransom.

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Jawbone takes another hit at Fitbit, filing patent infringement suit

Jawbone takes another hit at Fitbit, filing patent infringement suit

Jawbone is coming for Fitbit, guns blazing. The company just filed a lawsuit alleging that Fitbit products are infringing on multiple Jawbone patents including a method for "reporting an individual's physiological or contextual status" and a "wellness application using data from a data-capable band." Jawbone is seeking damages and an injunction to halt the continued sales of Fitbit products. Jawbone's attacks couldn't be more precisely timed. Fitbit is getting ready for an initial public offering (IPO). No matter how things take a turn int he courtroom, the legal heat will certainly have some impact on Fitbit's IPO.

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Silk Road black market leader Ross Ulbricht gets life in prison

Silk Road black market leader Ross Ulbricht gets life in prison

Ross Ulbricht, the man behind the Silk Road online black market for drugs and other illicit goods, has been sentenced to life in prison. The news comes after a long legal battle spanning many months, one that included such things as law enforcement corruption and legal papers showing how the arrest came about. It's bad new for Ulbricht, who had asked for leniency ahead of the sentencing. Such serves as a warning for others considering using the Internet to run a criminal enterprise.

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Judge allows email scanning class action suit against Yahoo to proceed

Judge allows email scanning class action suit against Yahoo to proceed

Yesterday , U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh ruled in San Jose, California that two class action suits have enough merit to be brought against Yahoo as classes instead of individual suits. These suits were initially brought against Yahoo in 2013, but only now were ordered eligible to proceed. The plaintiffs allege that Yahoo scanned the emails to Yahoo Mail users that were sent from non-Yahoo Mail account holders, for the purposes of creating "targeted advertising." Yahoo allegedly scanned attachments as well.

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Jawbone sues Fitbit for ‘systematically plundering’ confidential data

Jawbone sues Fitbit for ‘systematically plundering’ confidential data

Fitbit's warm limelight has turned sour thanks to a lawsuit from competitor Jawbone, which has accused FitBit of "systematically plundering" its confidential data. How? According to the lawsuit, Fitbit has pilfered Jawbone's confidential details by snapping up former Jawbone employees who first downloaded confidential data they weren't supposed to have -- presumably, the thought process goes, taking that data with them to FitBit for its own gain. Such is the accusation, anyway.

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Oculus VR’s founder sued over alleged confidentiality breach

Oculus VR’s founder sued over alleged confidentiality breach

The founder of Oculus VR, Palmer Luckey, has been hit with a lawsuit from his former employer Total Recall Technologies. According to the lawsuit, Luckey used confidential information he acquired during his job at Total Recall to later launch his own Oculus Rift headset. As a result, Total Recall is seeking unspecified compensatory and punitive damages. Oculus has likewise been swept up into the lawsuit, but there are no statements from the company, which was acquired by Facebook, at this time.

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PayPal ordered to pay $25 million over deceptive practices

PayPal ordered to pay $25 million over deceptive practices

PayPal, used by online merchants and shoppers to send and process payments, has just settled a federal lawsuit from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) over alleged deceptive practices in its "Bill Me Later" program which is now known as PayPal Credit. PayPal will be returning $15 million to customers who lost money due to PayPal's practices, and a $10 million fine has been levied against PayPal, going towards the CFPB. After the settlement, PayPal will be required to correct its consumer disclosure policies, making them "clearly and prominently" displayed to consumers.

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Apple, A123 settle battery-powered talent poaching lawsuit

Apple, A123 settle battery-powered talent poaching lawsuit

Speculation surrounding Apple’s automotive initiative has quieted, but we’ve got new reason to think something is afoot. Today, Apple has agreed to settle a lawsuit with A123, an electric car battery maker who accused Apple of poaching talent. Specifically, Apple is said to have enticed engineers at A123 away to build some type of large scale battery lab. The suit, filed in February, has been routinely rebuffed by Apple. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, and both parties are said to be hammering out the details of a settlement.

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Sprint and Verizon settle FCC’s cramming charges for $158 million

Sprint and Verizon settle FCC’s cramming charges for $158 million

Verizon and Sprint have settled with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) over a series of unauthorized customer charges. The government probe alleged that Sprint and Verizon charged customers subscription fees for third-party services such as horoscope, or daily humor services. Although the lawsuits have only just now been settled, the companies were asked to halt their dubious "premium short message services" back in late 2013. The unauthorized subscriptions were about $9.99 per month, and Sprint and Verizon typically took a forty percent cut from each "crammed" charge.

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