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EA no longer paying gun makers for naming rights

EA no longer paying gun makers for naming rights

In an effort to slowly cut ties with various gun and weapon manufacturers, it's reported that Electronic Arts will stop paying gun makers for the privilege of using real gun names in their video games, but will still continue to use real names without paying for the naming rights, saying that they retain the right to depict real guns without a license.

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Casinos banning Google Glass over cheating threat

Casinos banning Google Glass over cheating threat

In a growing list of various locales that Google Glass has already been banned before its public release, casinos are starting to add on to that list. Caesers Palace in Las Vegas is the first major casino to prohibit Google Glass from being worn on the gambling floor to prevent cheating during casino games.

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White House hires Twitter legal director as chief privacy officer

White House hires Twitter legal director as chief privacy officer

The White House has hired its first ever chief privacy officer, and the the person to take the helm for the first time is Twitter's legal director Nicole Wong, who has over a decade of experience dealing with both copyright and privacy law. The appointment of a chief privacy officer comes at a curious time, when a handful of privacy bills are trying to make their way through Congress.

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Mongolia’s stolen T-Rex finally headed home: one year later

Mongolia’s stolen T-Rex finally headed home: one year later

Just under one year ago, the story of a $1 million dollar Tyrannosaurus Rex made its way across newslines due to its rarity and the fact that it'd been stolen from Mongolia. Fast forward to now and this Tarbosaurus Bataar thunder lizard is finally headed back to its home, the until-recently holder of this collection of fossils headed to court with a collection of charges against him. Eric Prokopi is not having a good day today.

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Opera sues former employee for giving trade secrets to Firefox devs

Opera sues former employee for giving trade secrets to Firefox devs

Makers of the Opera web browser have sued a former employee claiming that he took the trade secrets that was given at Opera and used them at Mozilla, the company behind the popular Firefox web browser. The man being accused, Trond Werner Hansen, left Opera in 2006, but returned in 2009 and 2010 as a consultant.

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ACLU: CISPA bill essentially dead

ACLU: CISPA bill essentially dead

The controversial CISPA bill recently passed through the House of Representatives with flying colors, and it's now in the Senate, where it will then be passed on to the President if the bill passes in the Senate. However, many groups and organizations are almost positive that the bill will be vetoed in the Senate, including the American Civil Liberties Union.

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Google sees record increase in government takedown requests

Google sees record increase in government takedown requests

Google released its seventh transparency report today, which highlights the number of takedown requests that Google receives on a bi-yearly basis. This time around, Google received 2,285 government requests to remove 24,179 pieces of content off of Google's search engine between July 2012 and December 2012, which is a record high.

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Apple fined $118,000 for China copyright infringement

Apple fined $118,000 for China copyright infringement

Apple has been ordered by a Chinese court to compensate three Chinese writers for infringing their copyrights. Apple made the authors' books available in iBooks without first seeking their permission. The Cupertino-based company will have to pay up 730,000 Yuan ($118,000) to the three writers for copyright infringement.

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New legislation aims for subsidized broadband in low-income homes

New legislation aims for subsidized broadband in low-income homes

In an effort to update the FCC's long-running Lifeline program that helps put telephone access in low-income homes, a new piece of legislation has been introduced to the House of Representatives that would aim to give low-income homes the opportunity for unsubsidized broadband internet access.

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House passes CISPA bill with flying colors

House passes CISPA bill with flying colors

After being squashed in the Senate last year, the CISPA bill has made a reappearance in the House of Representatives once again, and it passed with flying colors. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, as it's called, passed in the House by a majority vote of 288 to 127. It's now on to the Senate to get a yea or nay.

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Facebook partnering with attorneys general for privacy awareness

Facebook partnering with attorneys general for privacy awareness

Let's face it: Facebook privacy is something of a misnomer -- it's hard to use "Facebook" and "privacy" in the same sentence without it being considered negative. However, the social networking giant knows it, and it has announced that it will be partnering up with 19 state attorneys general in order to raise awareness for teen privacy on Facebook.

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Google issues settlement terms to the European Union

Google issues settlement terms to the European Union

Google has issued some new settlement terms to EU regulators to make sure that its search engine is much more competition-friendly. According to The Wall Street Journal's sources, Google's proposal was submitted last week, and will alter the way the search engine will look in Europe (it will look the same as it does now everywhere else in the world). If approved, Google would be bound to this proposal for 5 years, and it would be monitored by a 3rd party to ensure its following through with the terms.

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