law

Three foreigners charged with massive email breach in US

Three foreigners charged with massive email breach in US

There is that saying about the long arm of the law and the places that it reaches. Considering how this latest cyber crime case practically covers three countries both near and far from the US, that might very well be applicable here. Several agencies of the US government made a joint announcement revealing some of the details that concerns two Vietnamese nationals and one Canadian who have been involved in one of the most massive case of email hacking and spam in the history of the US.

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Canadian arrested after refusing to give phone passcode to border agent

Canadian arrested after refusing to give phone passcode to border agent

Earlier this week, a Canadian man was taken into custody by border agents after entering the country on an international flight from the Dominican Republic. Was he carrying prohibited items in his baggage, or maybe didn't have his travel documents in order? No, he merely refused to give up the passcode to his smartphone when stopped by agents for a search, on the grounds that the information was "personal." In what may set a legal precedent, this is Canada's first case in charging a citizen for refusing to provide their phone's passcode.

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Criminals caught with $260,000 in stolen LEGO sets

Criminals caught with $260,000 in stolen LEGO sets

It's hard not to notice these days that Lego is a hot commodity. Between a hit movie based on the small plastic bricks to collaborations with dozens of other franchises, which even cross over into video games, the near-timeless toy is more popular than ever. Like anything with a high value, thieves want to get their hands on it, often for the purpose of reselling it. In two separate situations last week, U.S. police caught more than a few criminals with nearly $260,000 worth of stolen Lego sets in their possession.

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Google voices opposition to court-blessed remote hacking

Google voices opposition to court-blessed remote hacking

The Internet has definitely changed the legal landscape by blurring the boundaries of geophysical territories. It has made the world both a smaller and bigger place, and the law is having a bit of trouble trying to catch up. Sometimes, in scrambling to adjust to the times, governments overreact and try to claim overarching powers. Such might be the case with the proposed amendment to the Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 41, which could allow the government to remotely access computers even in other countries.

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Canadian woman finds $800 of marijuana inside Angry Birds board game

Canadian woman finds $800 of marijuana inside Angry Birds board game

Call it one heck of a lucky deal, or a brilliant way to conduct a closeout sale by Target in Canada, either way, one woman got much more than she bargained for. The mother went to a local Target store looking for discounts, as the retailer recently announced it was leaving the Canadian retail market, and purchased a copy of the Angry Birds Star Wars: Battle on Geonosis Telepods board game for only $5.99 for her son. But inside were two bags of marijuana.

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Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

President Obama publicly signed the executive order driving through new cyber security legislation today, using an appearance at Stanford to discuss the controversial balance of privacy and protection. The bill - already a topic of fierce debate in Congress, which had continually refused to pass it - demands greater information sharing between government and private industry, "sharing appropriate information" as relevant to ensure vital infrastructure isn't compromised by hackers or malicious governments. However, exactly what counts as "appropriate", and what impact that has on individual privacy, remains to be seen.

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Cops flood Waze with fake police sightings

Cops flood Waze with fake police sightings

A lot of navigation apps dot the app stores, but Waze stands out of among them for one particular reason: it lets users know when a cop has been spotted in any particular region. Though not always accurate, this has been a favorite feature among users, and an excellent way to help avoid getting a speeding ticket. As you might have heard, though, law enforcement isn't so happy about the feature, going so far as requesting that Google/Waze eliminate the feature in the name of officer safety. That request didn't pan out, and now officers are using a different tactic.

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FCC to propose treating ISPs as public utilities

FCC to propose treating ISPs as public utilities

The FCC might be heating up the old net neutrality debate again come Thursday. The agency is expected to propose the rules that would determine how business around the Internet will be treated in the years to come. In this latest version, FCC chair Tom Wheeler is expected to adopt President Obama's stance to treat broadband providers the same way telecommunications companies are treated and to regulate them as public utilities, giving government more weight over the deals between broadband providers and content providers, much to the chagrin of many in the industry.

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$19.5M in counterfeit NFL merch seized by Homeland Security

$19.5M in counterfeit NFL merch seized by Homeland Security

As you sit down to watch the Super Bowl tomorrow, rest easy knowing that your favorite NFL jersey and other sportswear is authentic, legitimate, and safe, thanks to officials at Homeland Security. Much like they do every year around this time, government authorities have just announced that millions of dollars in counterfeit, "unsafe" NFL merchandise have been seized, this time amounting to $19.5 million. That means you have a few less knockoff sports team jerseys, shirts, and hats to worry about.

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Germany to give self-driving cars a highway test track

Germany to give self-driving cars a highway test track

While many governments are wary of the progress of autonomous, self-driving cars, Germany is taking quite an opposite stance. As a country that is readily associated with the automobile industry, it can't but be interested in the development of the cars of the future. That is why the German government will be setting up the A9 Autobahn highway in Bavaria as a specialized track to be used for testing such self-driving automobiles in the hopes that the country will become a world leader in this market segment as well.

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