law

South Korea’s new signs warn against smartphone use while walking

South Korea’s new signs warn against smartphone use while walking

Texting while driving is outlawed in several places because of the life-threatening consequences of such actions, both for the driver and others around him. Texting while walking, on the other hand, is now almost just as dangerous and, in fact, is starting to become illegal in certain places. While South Korea isn't yet taking such extreme measures, the country's capital will be installing new traffic signs that inform, warn, and hopefully admonish pedestrians not to use their smartphones while walking, or, worse, crossing the street.

Continue Reading

UK Commons passes Investigatory Powers Bill, no backdoor clause

UK Commons passes Investigatory Powers Bill, no backdoor clause

Apple may have scored somewhat of a victory in the name of security and privacy in the UK just as it somewhat did in the US just recently. December last year, Apple voiced out its concerns over the UK's proposed Investigatory Powers Bill that would require companies to have backdoors to encrypted systems so that government access could be granted any time. That bill has now been passed by the UK's House of Commons but removes the sections that make such backdoors necessary, thanks partly to the opposition of companies like Apple, Google, Microsoft, and many others.

Continue Reading

Automakers to NHTSA on self-driving cars: slow down

Automakers to NHTSA on self-driving cars: slow down

It is almost ironic. After Obama's State of the Union address early this year, the government has committed itself to kickstart the nation's journey towards self-driving cars, almost in start contrast to the uncertainty looming over law makers' and authorities' heads over those driverless vehicles. Now, however, a global group of car makers are advising the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to take things slowly and ease up on the now aggressive push to write up regulations that would prove to be actually harmful to the industry in the long run.

Continue Reading

ZTE faces US export restrictions for violating Iran ban

ZTE faces US export restrictions for violating Iran ban

Chinese smartphone OEMs already have a hard time breaking into the US market, but ZTE might soon find itself in more trouble than just smartphone sales in the US. According to some documents allegedly seen by Reuters, the US Commerce Department is about to impose some rather heavy restrictions on the company that will basically make it almost impossible for ZTE to get supplies from US companies. This export restriction will be a sanction against ZTE for allegedly violating the export control on shipping US technologies to Iran in 2012.

Continue Reading

Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

This afternoon the FBI and Apple spoke before a congressional panel regarding iPhone encryption. This case has to do with unlocking a singe iPhone, says the FBI, one owned by a San Bernardino shooter. After a New York Magistrate Judge (James Orenstein) ruled against the FBI on compelling Apple to unlock this iPhone, the FBI and Apple went to congress to continue to speak on the issue. Apple's arguments have been straightforward. The FBI's arguments have stacked with fear mongering statements aplenty.

Continue Reading

FBI ordered San Bernardino county to reset shooter’s iPhone

FBI ordered San Bernardino county to reset shooter’s iPhone

If the consequences weren't so dire, the developments it the case of the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone are almost too comical to be real. The matter, however, is very serious, both for those whose lives were lost and affected in last year's shootings as well as for the future of mobile device legislation. In the most recent back and forth between the US government and Apple, the FBI finally acknowledged that it had a hand in getting the iPhone's iCloud password reset, and act which Apple claims has closed the doors on harvesting the device's data without requiring a backdoor.

Continue Reading

Bill could block attempts to enforce encryption backdoors

Bill could block attempts to enforce encryption backdoors

The fight for security and privacy, now embodied in the encryption of devices and services, has long taken a political flavor when the US government publicly advocated installing backdoors on such systems for the sake of criminal investigation. Now the story takes an interesting turn when two lawmakers cross the political divide to propose a bill that will preempt such proposals. Rep. Ted Lieu, a Democrat from California, and Rep. Blake Farenthold, a Republican from New York, have proposed a House bill that will prevent any state or local government from forcing OEMs to create such backdoors.

Continue Reading

NHTSA will consider Google’s self-driving car AI as “driver”

NHTSA will consider Google’s self-driving car AI as “driver”

It seems that President Obama's declared push to make the US a haven for self-driving cars is already starting to bear fruit. In what may be a significant milestone, the National Hightway Traffic Safety Administration or NHTSA has just given Google the break it needs to move forward. In a letter sent to the company, the traffic agency agreed to one of Google's proposal to have its Self-Driving System (SDS) AI to be considered as the legal "driver" of the car, opening the doors for more legal opportunities for Google's self-driving car.

Continue Reading

California also wants encryption backdoors on smartphones

California also wants encryption backdoors on smartphones

Another US state has added itself to the roster of those fighting for requiring encryption keys to be provided to aid in criminal investigation. Or as others call it, "weakening encryption". California assemblyman Jim Cooper proposed a new bill that eerily sounded like a similar proposal being made in New York City. The difference, however, is that the purpose isn't to fight terrorism but to crack down on human trafficking specifically. Still, it's basically the same mantra that's being repeated in the US, UK, and France, requiring companies to provide governments with keys when they need them.

Continue Reading

France goes against the flow, rejects encryption backdoor law

France goes against the flow, rejects encryption backdoor law

While the US, particularly New York, and the UK are on a crusade to legally mandate the creation of backdoors on otherwise tightly secure encrypted systems, the French government is doing the opposite. It has recently rejected a proposed amendment that would practically require companies to install such backdoors and give government the keys in case of a criminal investigation. This rejection is almost ironic considering it was the recent Paris attacks that are being used by other government to justify their push for encryption backdoors.

Continue Reading

Google, Facebook back Samsung on Supreme Court patent appeal

Google, Facebook back Samsung on Supreme Court patent appeal

Samsung has just gotten some mighty allies in its proxy legal tussle with Apple. Before 2015 ended, the Korean manufacturer went to the US Supreme Court asking for a review not of its patent case with Apple, which it already lost, but of the design patent system in general. Now several organizations, from tech giants to non-profit advocacies to legal interest groups, have filed amicus briefs in support of Samsung's case to have the federal government's interpretation of design patent laws revised for the current century.

Continue Reading

Facebook Friend Finder truly and finally illegal in Germany

Facebook Friend Finder truly and finally illegal in Germany

Legal cases usually take years because of appeal after appeal. But when they reach the highest court of the land, judgment is, more often than not, really final. That might be the case here with Facebook's ongoing, and now probably over, tussle in German courts over its Friend Finder feature. Now that the country's highest court, the Federal Court of Justice, has declared it illegal, there isn't much left for Facebook to do except to recoup its losses and to move forward. Without that feature in Germany, that is.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next