Internet

Eero wants to create mesh network for your home WiFi needs

Eero wants to create mesh network for your home WiFi needs

However the FCC rules on Net Neutrality (we hear you’ll like the outcome), we’re sure most people consider their home Internet a utility. Connectivity is crucial to thriving in society, as we’ve migrated our physical existence to the digital world. That’s why poor WiFi, especially at home, is rage-inducing. A new startup, Eero, wants to change all that. Their small hardware, when positioned strategically around the home, cobbles together a range extender, repeater, and router into one device. By connecting more than one Eero, you’re creating a mesh network, scalable to your wants. and needs.

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Twitter’s Instant Timeline gives new users a feed full of content

Twitter’s Instant Timeline gives new users a feed full of content

Think back to when you created your Twitter account -- it was a lonely timeline and you were prompted to follow a bunch of accounts in order to change that. This resulted in following friends and maybe a bunch of others randomly, then picking through them over time, getting rid of some, following others, until you were getting the tweets you really wanted. Twitter isn't satisfied with this new-user experience, and so has addressed it with a new feature called Instant Timeline, something that does exactly what its name suggests.

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FCC to propose treating ISPs as public utilities

FCC to propose treating ISPs as public utilities

The FCC might be heating up the old net neutrality debate again come Thursday. The agency is expected to propose the rules that would determine how business around the Internet will be treated in the years to come. In this latest version, FCC chair Tom Wheeler is expected to adopt President Obama's stance to treat broadband providers the same way telecommunications companies are treated and to regulate them as public utilities, giving government more weight over the deals between broadband providers and content providers, much to the chagrin of many in the industry.

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The Pirate Bay back online after police take-down

The Pirate Bay back online after police take-down

The Pirate Bay, the internet's favorite torrent search engine, is back online right now, roughly seven weeks after being raided by law enforcement in home country Sweden. While the website and its founders have long been targeted by authorities for violations of piracy laws, this was the longest period the site was offline, and it was definitely in question if it would ever return. As the ultimate symbol of its rise from the ashes once more, the site's pirate ship logo is currently replaced by a phoenix.

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Marriott un-blocks Wi-fi, promises to behave

Marriott un-blocks Wi-fi, promises to behave

After being scolded by the FCC for blocking Wi-Fi signals inside their own hotels, the Marriott International have responded with a begrudging agreement. In addition to Marriott Rewards members receiving free Wi-Fi starting on the 15th of this month (earlier this month, that is), the Marriott will no longer block Wi-Fi signals from 3rd party sources. This means that if you bring your own smartphone and want to tether to it, you're now free to do so. You weren't allowed to connect with your own devices as recent as January of this year.

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Google caves to privacy demands after UK investigation

Google caves to privacy demands after UK investigation

Google will change its controversial privacy policy in the UK, acquiescing to regulators who maintain the search giant's attempts to simplify its terms & conditions in fact left them half-baked. The agreement, announced today by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) in the UK, will see Google make changes to how it collects, uses, and communicates user data by June 30, 2015, with more adjustments over the coming two years. It's another pain point in what has been a nearly three year long headache for Google, which revealed its new approach to privacy back in early 2012.

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Reddit’s first Transparency Report shows few data requests

Reddit’s first Transparency Report shows few data requests

Because it's January, companies have been dropping their latest transparency reports detailing government data requests from the second half of 2014 -- we saw Dropbox's earlier this morning, for example. Reddit, being the massively popular website that it is, is no doubt hit with data requests, but as its first-ever Transparency Report shows, they're relatively few and far between. Despite having 174 million or so regular visitors, the site was the recipient of only 55 user data requests in 2014.

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Imgur just made GIF creation much easier with free online tool

Imgur just made GIF creation much easier with free online tool

Creating a GIF might seem like witchcraft to the uninitiated, but it’s really not that difficult. Apps like GIFBrewery for OS X make quick work of taking your videos from full-length to looping clips in seconds. Thanks to Imgur, you can do the same with any video, now. Via their GIF creation tool, which is now live, videos from a hosting site like YouTube or Vimeo can become GIFs. Keep in mind that whatever GIF you create becomes public domain.

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FCC rules broadband Internet must be 25 Mbps down/3 Mbps up

FCC rules broadband Internet must be 25 Mbps down/3 Mbps up

The FCC just took a bold step in the right direction. We’d previously reported the agency was discussing a reclassification on what broadband Internet actually is, with a proposal to raise the threshold to 25Mbps download and 3Mbps upload speeds for broadband. All the talk actually led somewhere, and the FCC is settled on that redefinition of 25/3Mbps as broadband. The previous definition of broadband was 4Mbps download, and 1Mbps upload. While this doesn’t change what your Internet provider offers, it does change how they present it.

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Google, others could be ‘accomplices’ to hate speech under French law

Google, others could be ‘accomplices’ to hate speech under French law

France is preparing to draft a new law, and under it Google, Twitter, and other tech companies like them would be considered accomplices to hate speech if extremist messages are hosted on their services. The announcement was made on Tuesday by France's President Francois Hollande, and Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve will be traveling to the United States soon in an effort to build favor among tech companies. This follows the nation's tragic terror attack earlier in January, and the subsequent efforts to squash extremist communications.

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