Internet

Twitter advertising update allows targeting based on email addresses and IDs

Twitter advertising update allows targeting based on email addresses and IDs

Yesterday, Twitter revealed a refresh to its Web design, something still rolling out and ushering in another change, this one for the company's advertising partners: the ability to target based on email addresses and Twitter user IDs. The announcement was made on the company's advertising blog today, and expands the functionality to excluding users just the same, offering more control over all.

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YouTube adds comments page following user outcry

YouTube adds comments page following user outcry

YouTube revealed last fall that Google+ would be integrated into its comment system, causing a sweeping overhaul to the video service and forcing many onto Google's social network. The change went live by early November, and with the changes came a user outcry on multiple levels -- from those who resented being pushed onto Google+, and from creators who found managing comments unnecessarily difficult as a result.

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FCC Net Neutrality powers struck down by federal court

FCC Net Neutrality powers struck down by federal court

This morning a court has struck down the FCC's ability to enforce certain key "Net Neutrality Rules" on companies that would favor certain kinds of web traffic over others. That's what Net Neutrality protects the public against, after all: with a "neutral" law in place, all web data is treated equally. Without these rules in place, companies that provide web connectivity are able to legally place restrictions on some content while making other content run faster - whichever they do so choose.

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Dogecoin trading volume trumps all other digital currencies

Dogecoin trading volume trumps all other digital currencies

Digital currencies are often hit or miss, with Bitcoin being king among them and other lesser known digital currencies languishing in the pool of at-least-I'm-worth-something. Then there's Dogecoin. The currency was created in short order as little more than a joke, capitalizing on the amusing Doge meme and entering the digital world with a high maximum output of 100 billion. Though worth little, Dogecoin's trading volume has bypassed all other digital currencies.

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Wickr founder details FBI request for backdoor

Wickr founder details FBI request for backdoor

In December, it was reported that security firm RSA -- according to documents leaked by Edward Snowden -- was paid millions by the NSA to put a back door into its encryption products. A couple days later, the company denied having a secret contract with the government agency, and said that it never knowingly put a back door in its offerings. That didn't stop some companies from gravitating away from RSA, however, and one such company was Wickr. The company's founder, Nico Sell, announced this change at an RSA Security Conference, during which she made it clear her company would not have a back door and that users' security was important. Immediately after, an FBI agent approached her with a request -- to add a backdoor on behalf of the agency.

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Alaska town still offline after New Year’s revelry takes down Internet

Alaska town still offline after New Year’s revelry takes down Internet

New Year's is little more than yester-week's memory, serving as the landing pad for millions who spent the last day of 2013 celebrating. For one Alaskan town, the New Year also came sans Internet access, something that still persists ten days later. The reason? Tradition, and poor judgment when some possibly inebriated individual decided where to shoot his shotgun.

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Facebook slapped with lawsuit over ads reportedly displaying false endorsements

Facebook slapped with lawsuit over ads reportedly displaying false endorsements

Facebook has been hit with another lawsuit this month, this one by a user who states the social network falsely showed that he "Liked" USA Today when, in fact, he never had. Such an advertisement appeared to the people on his friends list, showing them an endorsement from him that he states he never performed. The user is seeking financial compensation for this action, as well as compensation for all other users who experienced the same phenomenon.

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Seattle nixes Gigabit Squared fiber Internet plan ahead of launch

Seattle nixes Gigabit Squared fiber Internet plan ahead of launch

In late December 2012, it was revealed Seattle had partnered up with Gigabit Squared to bring gigabit Internet to some of its districts as part of the Gigabit Neighborhood Gateway Program. The initial launch was to be in 12 neighborhoods, and by this past summer, the pricing for the plans had been revealed. As it turns out, all was for naught, as the entire plan has been scrapped.

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Google hit with fine in France over privacy violations

Google hit with fine in France over privacy violations

Google has been slapped with a fine by France's CNIL, a data protection entity that has taken issue with the Internet giant's privacy policy migration into a single unit. Though there's nothing inherently wrong with having a single unified privacy policy -- which is arguably easier to deal with than a separate one for each service -- the way in which Google pulled it off was in violation of France' s requirements. As a result, the company was fined $204,000.

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