Internet Explorer

Google: Microsoft grandstanding over web privacy

Google: Microsoft grandstanding over web privacy

Google has fired back at Microsoft over claims the search company bypasses privacy systems in Internet Explorer, arguing that its rival's P3P policies are "widely non-operational" and incompatible with today's web use. Microsoft had suggested that Google did not observe the so-called "self-declaration protocol", or P3P, which demands sites present a machine-readable version of their privacy practices. However, in a statement by senior VP of communications and policy, Rachel Whetstone, Google says Microsoft's system is outdated and over-involved, and more importantly breaks features like the Facebook "Like" button.

Continue Reading

Google bypasses IE privacy says Microsoft

Google bypasses IE privacy says Microsoft

Hot off the news that Safari's privacy measures for users had been bypassed by Google last week, Microsoft is joining in by noting that their Internet Explorer web browser's privacy controls had been modified in a similar manner. Protection tips have been offered up by Microsoft and they've taken this opportunity to push Google into the mud once more as they continue to defend themselves against privacy naysayers. Microsoft has reportedly contacted Google to ask it to "commit to honoring P3P privacy settings for users of all browsers."

Continue Reading

Internet Explorer 6 has under 1% share in the US

Internet Explorer 6 has under 1% share in the US

So long, IE6. You had a good run as the dominant browser for the better part of a decade. But with the combined efforts of Mozilla, Google, Apple and (last bust certainly not least) Microsoft itself, your reign of Internet supremacy is coming to a final end. According to the latest metrics posted to the Windows Team Blog, Internet Explorer 6 is used by less than 1% of Windows PCs in the US, having been supplanted by IE7 and later versions, Firefox and Chrome.

Continue Reading

Microsoft says goodbye to Internet Explorer 6

Microsoft says goodbye to Internet Explorer 6

Microsoft today celebrated the demise of its decade-old Internet Explorer 6 web browser. According to the latest data from Net Applications, IE6 usage has officially dropped to below 1 percent in the US, following Austria, Poland, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway. Usage is also dropping near 1 percent in the Czech Republic, Mexico, Ukraine, Portugal, and the Phillippines.

Continue Reading

Internet Explorer slips as Chrome grabs browser market share

Internet Explorer slips as Chrome grabs browser market share

The battle of the browsers continues, with Microsoft's Internet Explorer losing market share to Google's Chrome and others, while analysts predict a sub-50-percent dip for IE as early as March 2012. Counting all versions, Internet Explorer dropped to 51.9-percent market share in December according to Net Applications, ComputerWorld reports, with Chrome ending the year at 19.1-percent. However, Microsoft maintains that the most important number to consider is the growth in IE9 installs on Windows 7.

Continue Reading

Dear Readers: why do you still use Internet Explorer?

Dear Readers: why do you still use Internet Explorer?

This week we've learned two very important facts regarding the most infamous web browser of all, Internet Explorer: first that Microsoft intends to auto-update all of their older versions for users to the newest IE version 9, and second that Google Chrome 15 is now the most popular web browser version in the world. Though when you add up all the users using ANY version of Internet Explorer, you find that it still dominates this planet by a long shot, it's still rather interesting that any one browser has taken the lead over the ultra-dominant browser made so fantastically giant by its pre-installed status on Windows-toting machines worldwide. So what's your excuse?

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6