Intel

Intel admits CES wearables used rival chips

Intel admits CES wearables used rival chips

Intel's much-vaunted wearables shown off at CES 2014 last week didn't even necessarily use the company's own processors, it has admitted, with at least one of the gadgets using low-power chips from arch rival ARM. Some of the prototypes relied on "third-party parts" an Intel spokesperson conceded to PCMag, though declined to specify either which devices or which components; however an insider fingered the Intel Jarvis smart headset as using an ARM processor.

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Mimo baby monitor onesie hands-on

Mimo baby monitor onesie hands-on

Rest Devices has been showing off the Mimo baby monitor here at CES 2014. While the baby monitor portion of the name may bring thoughts of a camera and screen setup allowing you to remotely look in on your sleeping child -- the Rest Devices product is actually a wearable and as a result, it is able to offer quite a bit in terms of detail.

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Intel talks wearables: Fashion forward, tech behind

Intel talks wearables: Fashion forward, tech behind

Intel isn't leaving its wearables push to chance, looking to the world of fashion in order to do what its executives claim nothing else in the segment has managed: build an emotional relationship without compromise with the wearer. "Today the smart wearables we see on the market are very much led by technology companies," Ayse Ildeniz, VP for business development and strategy in Intel's New Devices Group said today during a CES 2014 roundtable. "Whereas, the things we wear are very personally-led: we somehow get very attached to them." To try to build that emotional stickiness, Intel is being very clear on its limits: unlike the do-everything approaches of Samsung, Pebble, and others, it's going to focus on the chips and leave the rest to the fashionistas.

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LaCie Little Big Disk Thunderbolt 2 boasts title of fastest portable storage offering

LaCie Little Big Disk Thunderbolt 2 boasts title of fastest portable storage offering

LaCie has introduced the Little Big Disk Thunderbolt 2 here at CES 2014, something the company is hailing as the faster portable storage option presently available. As you may have guessed from the name, the LBD model uses Thunderbolt 2, which allows it to transfer speeds of up to 1375MB/s, outpacing USB 3.0 by quite a bit. As with some of the other design-centric products LaCie introduced today, the Little Big Disk also has a carefully-chosen design.

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