Intel

Intel goes local for Jarvis voice control to outspeed Siri

Intel goes local for Jarvis voice control to outspeed Siri

Intel will rely on local processing grunt not cloud crunching for the voice control its Jarvis wearable will use, using a specially-created voice recognition system designed to run on the compact earpiece. Revealed at CES 2014, Jarvis aims to usurp Apple's Siri and Google Now by reacting to spoken commands and remotely controlling a smartphone, as well as delivering contextual information direct into the wearer's ear. However, unlike both of its rivals, Jarvis will be able to do that even if it doesn't have an internet connection.

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Apple Mac mini update to bring Intel Haswell processors

Apple Mac mini update to bring Intel Haswell processors

Apple's Mac mini doesn't get a lot of love, at least when it comes to updates. It looks like that will change next month, if a Belgian retailer's website is accurate -- a model update is set to arrive bearing Intel Haswell processors, as well as a couple other changes. Unfortunately, no images of the next iteration are available, but the end of February appears to be its slated launch time frame.

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Intel admits CES wearables used rival chips

Intel admits CES wearables used rival chips

Intel's much-vaunted wearables shown off at CES 2014 last week didn't even necessarily use the company's own processors, it has admitted, with at least one of the gadgets using low-power chips from arch rival ARM. Some of the prototypes relied on "third-party parts" an Intel spokesperson conceded to PCMag, though declined to specify either which devices or which components; however an insider fingered the Intel Jarvis smart headset as using an ARM processor.

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Mimo baby monitor onesie hands-on

Mimo baby monitor onesie hands-on

Rest Devices has been showing off the Mimo baby monitor here at CES 2014. While the baby monitor portion of the name may bring thoughts of a camera and screen setup allowing you to remotely look in on your sleeping child -- the Rest Devices product is actually a wearable and as a result, it is able to offer quite a bit in terms of detail.

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Intel talks wearables: Fashion forward, tech behind

Intel talks wearables: Fashion forward, tech behind

Intel isn't leaving its wearables push to chance, looking to the world of fashion in order to do what its executives claim nothing else in the segment has managed: build an emotional relationship without compromise with the wearer. "Today the smart wearables we see on the market are very much led by technology companies," Ayse Ildeniz, VP for business development and strategy in Intel's New Devices Group said today during a CES 2014 roundtable. "Whereas, the things we wear are very personally-led: we somehow get very attached to them." To try to build that emotional stickiness, Intel is being very clear on its limits: unlike the do-everything approaches of Samsung, Pebble, and others, it's going to focus on the chips and leave the rest to the fashionistas.

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