HTC Desire

HTC Desire Review

HTC Desire Review

The HTC Desire is the company's second-strike in what they hope will be a one-two sucker punch for the Android competition. Following on from the excellent HTC Legend, the Desire borrows plenty from Google's Nexus One but packages it with HTC Sense for arguably better out-of-the-box usability. It makes for a tricky argument, however; HTC manufacture both smartphones, and have been accused by some of purposefully building the Desire to a price by snipping away at the spec sheet. We've got two questions, then: is the HTC Desire any good, and does it hold its own against the Google Nexus One? To find out, check the full SlashGear review after the cut.

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HTC Desire Unboxing [Video]

HTC Desire Unboxing [Video]

While the HTC Legend was a shiny, unibody wonder, the undoubtable star of Mobile World Congress last month was the HTC Desire. Instantly dubbed "the Nexus One with Sense", the Android 2.1 smartphone has just arrived on the SlashGear doorstep demanding its unboxing video privileges. Who are we to turn down a 3.7-inch AMOLED display, 1GHz Snapdragon processor and 5-megapixel camera? Check out the unboxing, plus a first-look comparison with the Nexus One, after the cut.

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HTC Legend: I need a Hero

HTC Legend: I need a Hero

You could well argue that the HTC Hero was the Android smartphone of 2009. While Motorola's DROID brought with it a larger display, newer version of the OS and arguably more functional hardware keyboard, HTC led the pack months in advance. Multitouch-capable, distinctly designed and outfitted with a genuinely compelling UI in the shape of HTC Sense, the Hero fast became the poster-child of Android. Now, the company are hoping to follow that success with the HTC Legend, a slick Hero update with a tactile unibody aluminum shell. Is it a worthy sequel or has the HTC Desire stolen the Legend's flagship thunder; more importantly, is it sufficiently different from the smartphone it replaces?

HTC Sense already hacked for Nexus One

HTC Sense already hacked for Nexus One

When we wrote on Saturday that one of the more obvious differences between the HTC Desire and the Google Nexus One would be rapidly addressed by the Android home-brew crowd, we perhaps didn't expect a custom Nexus One ROM with HTC Sense and Flash 10.1 support to come so soon.  Still, if you're at the bleeding edge and you simply can't wait until the Desire's April 2010 release date to get your hands on the new version of Sense, Modaco are offering an alpha-build ROM for the Nexus One.

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HTC Desire vs. Google Nexus One

HTC Desire vs. Google Nexus One

One of the biggest announcements from MWC 2010 this past week has been the official debut of the HTC Desire, instantly dubbed the Google Nexus One with HTC Sense. With HTC the OEM parent behind both theirs and the Google-branded smartphone, would-be buyers (and potentially remorseful Nexus One owners) are already looking for the differentiating factors between the two; check out our head-to-head comparison after the cut.

HTC Desire Hands-on

HTC Desire Hands-on

We've made no bones about how impressed we've been by the Google Nexus One - at least one member of the SlashGear team abandoned his iPhone 3GS in favor of it, in fact - but the HTC Desire may just have stolen our hearts. Ostensibly the same device as the Nexus One, albeit in a different casing, what makes the difference is HTC's Sense UI, which as we found on the Legend is a neat step up over previous-gen devices. Check out more first-impressions, together with a hands-on gallery and video, after the cut.

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HTC Desire official: Nexus One with HTC Sense

HTC Desire official: Nexus One with HTC Sense

HTC have officially announced the HTC Desire - the handset previously known as the HTC Bravo - at Mobile World Congress 2010 this week. The smartphone is, in essence, HTC's own-brand version of the Google Nexus One, tailored to a European market. As with the Nexus One there's a 3.7-inch AMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 5-megapixel camera with LED flash and Android 2.1; you also get the same, 1GHz Snapgragon processor. The key differences are the inclusion of the latest version of HTC Sense, the omission of active noise cancellation, and the use of an optical joystick rather than a physical trackball.

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