hspa+

T-Mobile Sensation 4G Review

T-Mobile Sensation 4G Review

The approach of the T-Mobile Sensation 4G may have been keeping Android fans awake at night, but I wasn't one of them. I have to admit, I haven't been feeling HTC's recent handsets. Sure, they're well made and reliable, but it also felt like the company had taken a cookie-cutter approach, churning out little-changed me-too phones across the carriers. HTC's - since moderated - attitude towards bootloader locking didn't help. More importantly, I've been using an imported Samsung Galaxy S II and fell in love with the smoking fast dual-core, slim and light build, brilliant Super AMOLED Plus display and excellent camera. For me, the GSII was the phone to have right now; could the Sensation 4G convince me otherwise?

Continue Reading

AT&T 4G LTE plans revealed: Five markets this summer

AT&T 4G LTE plans revealed: Five markets this summer

We have to admit, AT&T's current "4G" offering - which uses HSPA+ - has left us pretty much cold, with underwhelming speeds in comparison to Verizon's LTE network. Happily AT&T also has LTE plans of its own, and the carrier has just announced the first five markets to get the speedier 4G access: Dallas, Houston, Chicago, Atlanta and San Antonio will all get some AT&T LTE-lovin' as of this summer.

Continue Reading

AT&T 4G: Not all HSPA+ Phones are Created Equal

AT&T 4G: Not all HSPA+ Phones are Created Equal

At the Samsung/AT&T event today, the Samsung Infuse 4G was officially announced, and slated to be available May 15th. Our hands-on is here. It was also called the "first phone to support hspa+/hsupa at launch”. It has a dual antenna, just like the Motorola Atrix, but unlike the Atrix, it will have HSUPA enabled at launch. 4G comes in many different flavors, not all created equally. Read on for more details.

Continue Reading

AT&T Admits To FCC Its Network Unprepared For iPhone And iPad

AT&T Admits To FCC Its Network Unprepared For iPhone And iPad

AT&T officially filed with the FCC yesterday seeking approval for their acquisition of T-Mobile. Among the many reasons they gave, one that stood out was an admission that the current state of their network cannot handle the onslaught of iPhones, iPads, and other new smartphones and tablets. Thus, the T-Mobile acquisition is necessary to ensure an improved and stable network for customers. This may explain the controversy starting in February when new devices on the network seemed to have HSUPA intentionally disabled.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16