healthy

Microsoft Band builds on cycling as Health starts to shy from wearables

Microsoft Band builds on cycling as Health starts to shy from wearables

Microsoft’s wearable and fitness monitoring platform — Band and Health, respectively — are seeing another update. On the back of the most recent tweak, which brought in a cycling tile and a tiny keyboard to complement an SDK, Microsoft is today building on the bicycling monitoring and adding some context to gathered data. In a strange but ultimately smart turn of events, Microsoft is also announcing they’re no longer making Band a must-have to use their Health app. In the coming weeks, your smartphone sensors will be used to push basic info to Health.

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Apple Watch’s killer feature may be ‘learning’ your stride

Apple Watch’s killer feature may be ‘learning’ your stride

If you’ve ever worn a wearable and found it inaccurate, it may have been because you’re weird. Maybe you walk strange, or run kind of goofy. It’s part of what makes you unique, though, so why try to change? In her latest blog post discussing the Apple Watch, Christy Turlington Burns noted a quirk in the Apple Watch; a quirk you might like, weird-running reader. It seems that after a few runs, Burns’ Apple Watch picked up on her strides, ‘learning’ her gait.

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Google awarded patent for their smart contact lens

Google awarded patent for their smart contact lens

Remember the Google X skunkworks project that saw the company imagining contact lenses that could monitor your glucose levels? Sounded weird, and more like some means to an end for a bigger project. Then we found Google had a partner in Novartis, and the contact lens that could monitor your health seemed a bit closer to reality. It’s now even closer to being on your eye, as Google has been granted a patent to manufacture the lenses, which have multiple layers and their own chipset.

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Fitbit adds bicycling activity monitoring, multi-sensor tracking

Fitbit adds bicycling activity monitoring, multi-sensor tracking

Fitbit Surge is great for tracking your activity level and even has some insight on the type of activity you do, but it doesn’t necessarily apply to everyone. In an attempt to find a new market, Fitbit is updating their Surge wearable with the ability to track bicycling metrics. The update is also bringing in 9-hour battery life for GPS use, and a swipe-through interface for when you’re riding your bike. There’s even a new biking-centric page in the Fitbit app.

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Atari Fit lets you play games like Centipede if you exercise enough

Atari Fit lets you play games like Centipede if you exercise enough

Do you want to play Centipede? Of course you want to play Centipede; everyone wants to play Centipede. You could download the Atari Greatest Hits app, but that offers in-app purchases for games. If you don’t want to spend a few bucks, but do want to play Centipede (remember, everyone wants that), Atari will let you earn your games the old fashioned way. With Atari Fit, you get a pretty standard fitness app, but the more you work out, the more games you get!

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Jawbone UP, Nike Fuelband stripped from Apple Store

Jawbone UP, Nike Fuelband stripped from Apple Store

With Apple Watch looming on the horizon, it seems Apple is clearing room from retail stores to make room for their own wearable. In your local Apple Store, you will no longer find most Jawbone products or the Nike Fuelband. Though both are fitness bands that don’t necessarily compete directly with Apple Watch, they’ve nonetheless been removed from circulation via Apple. Neither device can be found via Apple’s online store, either. Other wearables are still available, at least online, but if you were planning to pick up a Jawbone UP24 with your new iPhone, think again.

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Fitbit buys FitStar, gives your workouts context

Fitbit buys FitStar, gives your workouts context

Fitbit, the only company we know of that actually encourage you to not wear their fitness bands, has acquired FitStar. For now, the two companies will remain separate, FitStar users can publish their workouts to the Fitbit app. Over time, the two will begin using a single Fitbit sign-in, though it’s not clear if FitStar will eventually go away, with its existing services melded into Fitbit. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but TechCrunch is reporting the deal is likely between $25-40 million, cash and stock.

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HTC Grip hands-on; finally, an HTC wearable

HTC Grip hands-on; finally, an HTC wearable

As expected, HTC now has a wearable. The company has long been complimentary of wearables, and vowed long ago to have one for us at some point. With the Grip, HTC hopes to get a grip on the wearable market, and tough it has a display — the Grip is more fitness wearable than smartwatch. It also makes good on HTC’s partnership with Under Armour, and when we consider other moves Under Armour has made, could make this wearable a go-to for fitness buffs.

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CliniCloud brings connected healthcare with stethoscope, thermometer

CliniCloud brings connected healthcare with stethoscope, thermometer

The ‘Internet of Things’ is bringing a lot of cool stuff that isn’t smartphones or tablets. Much of it has to do with your home, with several good DIY home security kits making a splash in their own way. Another avenue for connected success comes via medical equipment for the home, where devices connected to your phone (and an app) promise a better view of your health statistics. We’re seeing this come to light with Wishbone’s contactless thermometer, but a new pair of devices from CliniCloud want to push it a step further.

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Study: Wearables worse than phones for measuring steps

Study: Wearables worse than phones for measuring steps

The assumption that you need to strap something onto your wrist in order to accurately gauge your fitness level might not be accurate. Your favorite wearable might not be, either — or at least any more accurate at detecting steps taken than your phone. A new study claims apps are just as good at monitoring your activity level than some of the top wearables on the market. The University of Pennsylvania tested apps and wearables in a controlled environment, and the results are pretty interesting.

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