health

Nintendo Health business: breaking off to improve your quality of life

Nintendo Health business: breaking off to improve your quality of life

Back when Nintendo started manufacturing playing cards 125 years ago, its creators could hardly have imagined the size the company would have achieved here in our present. As many things have changed since the company arrived, inside the gaming industry as well as without, Nintendo has suggested today that they’ll be initiating a new business that will further address their expanded definition of entertainment.

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Google joins Global Alliance for Genomics and Health

Google joins Global Alliance for Genomics and Health

Today Google has made clear their intent on joining the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, a worldwide organization dedicated to standards, policies, and technology for the greater good of human health. Google’s role in this group will be to contribute toward refining technology and evolving the health research ecosystem for the whole planet.

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Samsung Gear Fit hands-on: Curved AMOLED health wearable

Samsung Gear Fit hands-on: Curved AMOLED health wearable

Let's be blunt: the Samsung Gear Fit looks just how we were hoping the original Galaxy Gear would in September last year, a sinuous strip of bright, curved OLED for your wrist. The health-centric sibling to the Gear 2 and Gear 2 Neo, the Gear Fit has a smaller touchscreen - 1.84-inches and 423 x 128 resolution - but which does most of what the Neo can in a more space-age package. Read on for some first-impressions.

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Sony SmartBand starts lifelogging from March

Sony SmartBand starts lifelogging from March

Sony has confirmed launch plans for its "Core" fitness wearable revealed at CES last month, now dubbed the Sony SmartBand SWR10 and expected to hit shelves - along with a new Lifelog app - in March. Back at CES Sony was relatively coy about what the "Core" would do, only showing off the Bluetooth LE-connected hardware and the different colored wristbands it could slot into. Now we know that it's the company's play to expand health wearables beyond simply tracking fitness.

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Fitbit recalls Force over skin irritation complaints

Fitbit recalls Force over skin irritation complaints

Fitbit is halting sales of its Force flagship fitness tracker, and recalling all existing units already on users' wrists, after a spate of skin irritation issues. The issue - which saw some Force wearers reporting what appeared to be allergic reactions to the silicone band, leaving their wrists red and inflamed where it had come into contact with their skin - only affects "a small percentage of Force users" Fitbit said in a statement, but will still offer a full refund to any existing owners who want to return the wearable.

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Windows Phone Bing Fitness, Food, and Travel apps launch with PC sync

Windows Phone Bing Fitness, Food, and Travel apps launch with PC sync

Microsoft has pushed out a clutch of new and updated Bing apps for Windows Phone, including Bing Health & Fitness to track activities, diet, and medical information, and make suggestions as to how users can be healthier. The new smartphone software - which also includes Bing Food & Drink, and Bing Travel - aims to fill in some of the software gaps in Windows Phone, in addition to updating Bing Finance, Bing Sport, and Bing News, and adding cross-platform sync between Windows Phone and Windows 8.

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Glass hits operating theater as wearable tech boosts cancer surgery

Glass hits operating theater as wearable tech boosts cancer surgery

"OK Glass, show me an X-ray." Surgeons at Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital are turning to Glass to summon patient records and more, with the hospital the first to use Google's wearable during abdominal surgery. Two physicians, Dr. Szotek and Dr. Jeff Browne, each sported Glass during the four-hour procedure, relying on Google's voice control to access medical information as they sliced out a tumor.

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Apple iWatch may predict heart attacks insiders claim

Apple iWatch may predict heart attacks insiders claim

Apple's "iWatch" wearable could predict heart attacks by tracking blood-flow from the noise it makes in arteries, new sources claim, along with further chatter of talks between Apple and Tesla, suggesting the Cupertino firm could be looking to significantly expand its footprint. The health wearable would use pioneering audio technology to track blood turbulence, it's said, differentiating between healthy flow and the sound of blood struggling to get past the plaque build-up that can lead to coronary failure.

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