health

Jawbone UP3 Review – Flawed Ambition

Jawbone UP3 Review – Flawed Ambition

There’s a war on, and it’s for space on your wrist. For years it’s been fitness trackers like Jawbone’s new UP3 that have been sneering at traditional watches, but as smartwatches like Apple Watch mature, now it’s the health bands that are under threat. Like any good - or cruel - personal trainer would tell you, when you feel the burn it’s time to push harder, and so Jawbone hasn't held back on the tech for its latest flagship. So many sensors, but does UP3 make sense?

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MyFitnessPal now has a ‘premium’ paid tier

MyFitnessPal now has a ‘premium’ paid tier

MyFitnessPal is taking a stab at monetization, unveiling a new ‘Premium’ tier of service. For $9.99/month or $49.99/year user will get more granular knowledge on food analysis, improved customer support, and an ad-free experience. There are even personalization options for those who would like to set daily goals, which can also be adjusted based on your daily exercise level. Premium members will also get access to exclusive content and food analysis based on nutritional information you might be tracking.

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Apple talks Apple Watch heart rate monitoring and tattoos

Apple talks Apple Watch heart rate monitoring and tattoos

Apple Watch is as good a smartwatch as we’ve seen enter the market, but like all gadgetry — it’s not without its quirks. The latest head-scratcher has been reports that Apple Watch won’t give an accurate reading of your heart rate when over a tattoo. To clarify just how their heart rate monitor works, Apple has created a page dedicated to walking us through the Apple Watch sensor hardware, and best practises for getting an accurate reading. They’ve also clarified that some tattoos may interfere with Apple Watch when it comes to reading your heart rate.

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Apple, IBM deal will bring iPads to Japan’s elderly

Apple, IBM deal will bring iPads to Japan’s elderly

Apple and IBM have entered an agreement with Japan Post to bring iPads to the elderly. The move is a technological step for Japan Post’s ‘Watch’ service, which leverages postal employees to check in on the elderly now and then. Watch currently costs 1,000 Yen/month ($8.50 or so). Japan Post is government-owned, and operates roughly 24,000 post offices in addition to a large bank. Japan Post is also one of the nation’s largest insurers, and hopes iPads will both scale their Watch service as well as make it easier on everyone involved.

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Microsoft Band builds on cycling as Health starts to shy from wearables

Microsoft Band builds on cycling as Health starts to shy from wearables

Microsoft’s wearable and fitness monitoring platform — Band and Health, respectively — are seeing another update. On the back of the most recent tweak, which brought in a cycling tile and a tiny keyboard to complement an SDK, Microsoft is today building on the bicycling monitoring and adding some context to gathered data. In a strange but ultimately smart turn of events, Microsoft is also announcing they’re no longer making Band a must-have to use their Health app. In the coming weeks, your smartphone sensors will be used to push basic info to Health.

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Playing Candy Crush Saga non-stop for 8 weeks ruptures man’s thumb tendon

Playing Candy Crush Saga non-stop for 8 weeks ruptures man’s thumb tendon

BlackBerry users from days of yore may remember the condition that was jokingly dubbed BlackBerry thumb — that is, a repetitive strain injury caused by tapping the device's buttons over and over again for long periods of time. Well, that condition can develop from any repetitive thumb use, and as this story reveals, one modern candidate may be the smartphone game Candy Crush Saga. Addiction to the free-to-play Candy Crush games isn't new, but this California man's playing was so excessive, he didn't even notice the pain leading up to a thumb tendon rupture.

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Garmn Vector 2, 2S make cycling power metrics easier to do

Garmn Vector 2, 2S make cycling power metrics easier to do

You might know Garmin to be more of a navigation technology company, but two years ago it debuted a Vector line of products that focused not on getting where you're going but on how you are getting there. The first Vector in 2013, followed by the Vector S a year later, are bike pedals that helped cyclists get a hold of their performance stats. Today, Garmin is stepping up, no pun intended, with the launch of the 2nd generation Vector 2 and Vector 2S pedals, now made even easier to install and remove.

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Jawbone UP2 packs UP24 tech in svelte UP3 style

Jawbone UP2 packs UP24 tech in svelte UP3 style

Jawbone may have had a few stumbles bringing the UP3 to market, but it's finally arriving and it's bringing a friend: the new Jawbone UP2. Taking the functionality of the well-regarded UP24, but repackaging it into a sleek new wristband form-factor borrowing the style of the UP3, the UP2 manages to be 45-percent of the volume of its predecessor while still delivering all the same fitness and sleep tracking abilities.

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Researchers might finally have a fix for the color blind

Researchers might finally have a fix for the color blind

Despite our many advancements in technology, there are still some biological matters that continue to confound and befuddle us. It might come as a surprise to many that color blindness, a condition that affects more than 10 million in the US alone, is one of those. But hopefully not anymore. Jay and Maureen Neitz, husband and wife researchers from the University of Washington, may finally have a way to fix this genetic mutation to help those affected by it to see in color again. And it won't even require surgery.

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White House details plan to fight drug-resistant bacteria

White House details plan to fight drug-resistant bacteria

Drug-resistant bacteria is a serious problem, causing thousands of deaths in the US (and even more elsewhere) and millions of hard-to-treat illnesses every year. It's important to address the issue, and while some campaigns aiming to educate the public on how to help prevent this have taken place, they haven't been enough. Now the White House is getting involved, with the Obama administration detailing its recent past efforts and future plans for addressing the issue, including the development of diagnostic tests and limiting inappropriate prescriptions.

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