health

Sony SmartBand 2 confirmed in leaked Play Store app

Sony SmartBand 2 confirmed in leaked Play Store app

Sony might have finally jumped on the Android Wear train with its SmartWatch 3, but that doesn't mean it has given up on its other wearables with its own custom OS. Long overdue, the SmartBand 2 fitness wearable might soon be a reality, as evidenced by its compannion app, simply called "SmartBand 2" as well, appearing briefly on Google Play Store. While the app itself has already been taken down, probably due to some clerical error, Information about the band's and the app's features have already been going around the Internet.

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Software can detect pain by analyzing a person’s face

Software can detect pain by analyzing a person’s face

A group of researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed software that can make an accurate guess at what level of pain someone is in just by analyzing their facial expressions. A computer using the algorithm can then act as a somewhat automated version of the pain measurement scale (seen above), which doctors and nurses ask a patient to use when answering the question "how badly does it hurt?" The software certainly won't replace a nurse asking the question, but it could help provide a more accurate answer if the patient is affected by other issues.

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Thync wearable claims it can change the way you think

Thync wearable claims it can change the way you think

We've seen gadgets and wearable that let us control devices and computers, but what if it was the other way around? What if there was a wearable that could change the way we think or, at the very least, the way we feel? Or maybe change the way we spell words. That is, more or less, the promise behind Thync, a new type of wearable that claims it can send you good vibes, literally, to make you feel better or, if needed, more pumped up to face the work at hand.

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No, your Apple Watch heart rate sensor is meant to do that

No, your Apple Watch heart rate sensor is meant to do that

Apple has quietly explained the change in Apple Watch heart rate measurement, a timing tweak that had left some fitness-focused wearers confused. Whereas the optical heart rate sensor - the glowing green light that tracks blood movement through the skin - had previously pinged on at a regular schedule, keen-eyed Watch owners had spotted potentially lengthy gaps between readings. Contrary to fears that Apple had inadvertently fouled up the system, however, the Cupertino firm insists the change is by design.

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Awair monitors your home or office’s air quality

Awair monitors your home or office’s air quality

Your home’s air quality might be suffering thanks to the traffic or businesses around you, but you might not realize it. Many of the problems in the air can’t be detected without help until they reach fairly serious levels, and so to prevent them from reaching that point we turn to air monitoring technologies. Fortunately, those technologies have become relatively inexpensive over the years and as such have found their way into homes. Awair is the latest example of this, serving as a stereo-like device (it looks like a stereo, is all) that keep tabs on nasties in the air.

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Robotic pill being developed as replacement for injection medications

Robotic pill being developed as replacement for injection medications

At some point in the future, you may no longer need to suffer through injections to have certain medications administered. The Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis and the US biotech startup Rani Therapeutics have revealed they will together in developing a "robotic pill" that could simply be swallowed and then deliver drugs to the body via needles made of sugar. This has the potential to make taking certain medication much more convenient for patients, as it could be a new delivery method for drugs that have never been possible in pill form before.

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Apple Watch users find latest update is affecting heart rate monitor

Apple Watch users find latest update is affecting heart rate monitor

On Tuesday of this week, Apple released the first update for Apple Watch, bringing the OS up to version 1.0.1. The patch was intended to improve both Siri and the performance of third-party apps, as well as fix a number of security issues. Unfortunately, the update has also had adverse effects on the Watch's heart rate sensor for more than a few users. Watch owners on both Apple's support forums and MacRumors' message boards have posted that their heart rate reading are being taken at infrequent intervals, as opposed to every 10 minutes.

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L’Oreal partners with bioprinting firm to 3D print human skin

L’Oreal partners with bioprinting firm to 3D print human skin

L'Oreal is partnering with 3D bioprinting company, Organovo to take their current skin farming to the next level. L'Oreal currently grows its own skin for testing beauty products and formulations. It is a necessary step before releasing products to market, so L'Oreal can see just how safe and effective its formulas are. Organovo is an industrial bioprinting company that 3D-printed artificial veins from living tissue in 2010.

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Basis Peak launches limited edition Titanium model, new leather straps

Basis Peak launches limited edition Titanium model, new leather straps

The Intel-owned Basis has one of the highest regarded wearables on the market right now with its Peak fitness tracker. The device is accurate and tracks just about everything you'd want a fitness device to, but it doesn't try be an ultimate do-everything smartwatch. The standard model is fairly priced at $200, but today they announced a limited edition Titanium Peak for $300 that brings a bit more style, and some new leather straps, to your wrist.

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Quick blood test can triage radiation exposure victims, saving lives

Quick blood test can triage radiation exposure victims, saving lives

In the rare, but serious, cases of a radiation leak like the Fukushima nuclear plant's meltdown, first responders are tasked with sending radiation victims to triage based on their level of exposure. A new genetics-based blood test could be a faster, more accurate way to assess how individual victims will respond to radiation. Researchers from Harvard Medical School and New York City's Montefiore Medical Center have created a method of identifying long-term damage from radiation, immediately. Their technique involved looking beyond blood cell counts and delving into blood-bound genes.

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