health

The Wearable Medic: GERO and figuring Parkinson’s from Fitbit

The Wearable Medic: GERO and figuring Parkinson’s from Fitbit

There's a suspicion among many that wearable tech is simply today's digital navel-gazing; a self-indulgent and meaningless set of metrics bordering on narcissistic over-obsession. The quantified self could soon become a whole lot more meaningful, however, if startup GERO has its way. Building on groundbreaking research by the Human Locomotome project, the Russian company says it can use the data from wearables like Fitbit's Force and Jawbone's UP to identify chronic conditions such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, depression, and even type 2 diabetes, simply from the way we move. SlashGear caught up with GERO's co-founders at CES as they shift things out of stealth mode.

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Polar’s new V800 sports watch, hands-on

Polar’s new V800 sports watch, hands-on

Wearable technology is on display front and center here at CES 2014, with many offerings showing up at every turn. One of those is Polar’s V800, a new offering from the company who is no stranger to wearables. We got a chance to learn a bit more about the Polar, and went hands-on with the latest sports watch.

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Garmin vivofit fitness band hands-on

Garmin vivofit fitness band hands-on

Garmin knows it can't count on the in-car navigation market to carry its fortunes, and so the company is ramping up its wearables focus, kicking off CES 2014 with the vivofit band. Tracking both movement and sleep, the vivofit hooks up to a computer via Bluetooth 4.0 or an ANT+ dongle, but the best news could be the battery life: Garmin says it'll last for a year on a single set of replaceable batteries.

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Cancer test costs could tumble in 2014 following DNA patent ruling

Cancer test costs could tumble in 2014 following DNA patent ruling

Cancer testing could get cheaper and more prevalent as the Supreme Court decision that DNA sequences cannot be patented opens up breast and ovarian cancer diagnostics, though experts warn that not all tests may be created equal. The most immediate effect of the ruling - that Myriad Genetics could not patent the BRCA1 and BRCA2 DNA sequences - has been a rush of other testing vendors announcing they'll be offering competition in the segment, but the US government is also wading in with talk that it will potentially halve what reimbursement it offers for cancer testing.

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Self-control enhanced by tiny electrical charge to the brain: study

Self-control enhanced by tiny electrical charge to the brain: study

A small study has shown with some certainty that self-control can be enhanced by applying electrical stimulation to the brain. Scientists applied electrodes to the prefrontal cortex of each participant via invasive surgery. The participants performed tasks that involved ceasing what they were doing or switching to a new task. When certain areas of the prefrontal cortex were given an imperceptible electric shock at that point, the participants performed better.

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