hard drive

LaCie Rikiki tiny external HDD is monkey catnip

LaCie Rikiki tiny external HDD is monkey catnip

Your eyes do not deceive you: that is a monkey, and it's attempting to steal your LaCie Rikiki hard-drive.  The grabby little simian has obviously spotted that LaCie's new external drive is the most compact 2.5-inch model on the market, offering up to 640GB of capacity in an aluminum chassis.

"Rikiki", meanwhile, is French for tiny, so the drive is a linguistics lesson as well as a place to offload your media files to.  We're not sure if the monkey is French - surely he'd be wearing a beret if that were the case.

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LaCie LaCinema Classic HD: 1TB, 1080p HD and DLNA

LaCie LaCinema Classic HD: 1TB, 1080p HD and DLNA

LaCie seem to be going back and filling in any blanks in their mediaplayer line-up right now, neatly slotting the LaCinema Classic HD into the range.  Coming somewhere in-between the non-HD LaCinema Classic and the HDD-free LaCinema Classic Bridge, the new device promises Full HD 1080p playback of various formats - including DivX, MKV, AVC and H.264 - from its 1TB internal hard-drive, together with DLNA media server support.

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Data Robotics unveil new Drobo S and DroboElite backup systems

Data Robotics unveil new Drobo S and DroboElite backup systems

Data Robotics have doubled their range of so-called intelligent backup systems with the launch of two new models, the Drobo S and the DroboElite.  The Drobo S takes the original four-bay Drobo and adds in not only an extra drive bay but an eSATA port and enhanced FireWire 800 performance, meaning that the backup system now boasts hardware redundancy against up to two simultaneous hard-drive failures.  Meanwhile the DroboElite has a full eight drive bays and dual iSCSI ports and is, unsurprisingly, targeted at small and medium businesses who want 16TB or more of backup space.

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Toshiba 320GB 1.8-inch HDD is world’s biggest

Toshiba 320GB 1.8-inch HDD is world’s biggest

Flash and solid-state drives have been catching up to tiny, 1.8-inch traditional hard-drives in ultramobile applications over the past year or so, but Toshiba don't think spinning platters are quite outmoded yet.  The company have revealed three new 1.8-inch HDDs including the industry's first 320GB unit, using unique high-density platters that permit data density of 516Gbpsi.

Each of the 3.0Gbps SATA drives spin at 5,400rpm and have 16MB of buffer memory, while there's apparently less of the high-pitched whine sometimes associated with such HDDs; in fact noise is down between 4 and 5dB over previous models.  As well as the 320GB drive, there are 160GB and 250GB versions.

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Seagate FreeAgent DockStar review

Seagate FreeAgent DockStar review

Most digital libraries flourishing and ubiquitous connectivity spreading, having access to our personal data and media wherever we are is looking all the more appealing. NAS (Network Attached Storage) devices have had the ability to share via broadband for years, but most owners don't take advantage of it; into the mixture steps Seagate, whose new FreeAgent DockStar takes the company's FreeAgent Go USB hard-drive and makes remotely sharing its content incredibly easy. Obvious addition to every home network, or is there a sting in the tail? Check out the full SlashGear review after the cut.

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CRU-DataPort 10 Secure HDD SecureDock Review

CRU-DataPort 10 Secure HDD SecureDock Review

With the average user entering dozens of passwords every day, to log into their computer, their email and their social networks, it's all to easy to forget that many files are even more valuable than our Facebook login. Drive encryption is becoming more relevant to people all the time, and there's a good argument for doing it properly if you're going to do it at all. CRU-DataPort's 10 Secure caddy and accompanying SecureDock are one such system, taking a standard SATA hard-drive and locking it up with military-grade encryption and a removable AES 128 key. Peace of mind or hardware-hurdle? Check out the full SlashGear review after the cut.

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