hacking

It’s the Chevy Corvette’s turn to get hacked

It’s the Chevy Corvette’s turn to get hacked

Car hacking seems to be the new black recently. As cars get smarter, they also become more enticing targets to hackers for both fun and profit. From wireless key fobs to Chrysler's Jeeps to GM's OnStar, it seems no car is safe. Not even Chevrolet's Corvette, apparently. Researchers from the University of California San Diego proved that this particular car, and probably others like it, are also susceptible to attacks, giving hackers unmitigated control over certain functions of the car, with some particularly dangerous consequences.

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Stagefright patches hitting Galaxy S5, Note 4, Note Edge on T-Mobile & Verizon

Stagefright patches hitting Galaxy S5, Note 4, Note Edge on T-Mobile & Verizon

While Google's Nexus devices have already been confirmed to be some of the first phones to get patched for the recent Android vulnerability Stagefright, other major devices, especially Samsung's flagships, are still at risk. While there's still no word on when the company's newest models, the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge will get updated, a number of their older phones are getting fixes today from carriers Verizon and T-Mobile, including the Galaxy S5, Note 4, and Note Edge.

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Tiny “RollJam” device can unlock car, garage doors

Tiny “RollJam” device can unlock car, garage doors

High tech smart cars aren't the only one susceptible to getting hacked. Even not so smart cars and garage doors that use wireless keys are open game to both playful and malicious hackers. At DefCon, hacker Samy Kamkar demonstrated how a $32 radio device can easily obtain a wireless key's "signature" code, which can then be replayed later to unlock that same door. And the owner will suspect nothing, aside from that strange first attempt at unlocking the door which, for no conceivable reason, fails.

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Facebook security hole remains open months after report

Facebook security hole remains open months after report

Android users can relax. This isn't about you this time. This time, it's Facebook's turn to take the hot seat. Not that it has completely left the chair anyway. According to Reza Moaiandinm, Technical Director of marketing company SALT.agency, Facebook has a gaping security hole that leaves it wide open to attack and its users vulnerable to phishing attempts. While news of such security lapses aren't exactly new, especially with Facebook involved, Moaiandinm's beef stems from the fact that Facebook has seemingly done nothing months after he reported the exploit.

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Report: China’s spies have been reading US officials’ emails since 2010

Report: China’s spies have been reading US officials’ emails since 2010

China has been accused in recent months of orchestrating a massive hack against the U.S. government's Office of Personnel Management, the insurance company Anthem, and more. According to a recently leaked report and unnamed government official, Chinese spies have also been reading emails from top Obama administration officials since at least April 2010. According to the leaked report, the email hack was first spotted in early 2010, and was codenamed both “Dancing Panda” and “Legion Amethyst” by the NSA. The report was made in 2014, and indicates the email breach was still actively happening at that time.

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Electric skateboards can be hacked, too

Electric skateboards can be hacked, too

News of cars being hacked have, as expected, instilled fear in the public, but don't think turning to an electric skateboard will eliminate the risk. A new exploit called, appropriately enough, "FacePlant", has been developed to show that electric skateboards can be just as vulnerable to hackers as some cars, and it isn't a concern to take lightly. While a skateboard isn't as big of a deal as a 2-ton vehicle cruising down the highway, it'll still be a problem if you're cruising down the road and your board, without warning, locks up.

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Firefox exploit discovered, but update is already available

Firefox exploit discovered, but update is already available

If you're a Firefox user and reading this, stop and update to version 39.0.3 right now. Mozilla has revealed on their blog that a nasty exploit has been discovered that can give someone access to the files on your computer. The security hole allows JavaScript to be injected, letting an attacker search your computer and then upload files to a server in Ukraine. Even worse is that fact that no trace of the breach is left behind, so users will have no idea the breach has taken place.

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Stagefright Detector App released for Android, warns if device is vulnerable

Stagefright Detector App released for Android, warns if device is vulnerable

With all the details coming out about Stagefright, the new Android vulnerability that could hijack your device, Android users are right to be concerned. While Google has released a patch, it's currently only available for Nexus devices. Almost everyone else is still at risk. Fortunately, the folks at Zimperium, the company that first discovered the Stagefright bug, have released the Stagefright Detector App to help keep users informed on whether their phone is still vulnerable.

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Tesla hacked: car can be shut down via connected laptop

Tesla hacked: car can be shut down via connected laptop

As the auto industry and security community is still reacting to the new about a Jeep Cherokee being hacked as it drove down the road, it comes as a surprise that Tesla, easily the most technology advanced vehicle the world has seen thus far, may have a similar vulnerability. At the ongoing hacking and security conference Def Con, researchers have revealed they were able to hack the all-electric, internet-connected Tesla Model S, the Wall Street Journal reports.

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Smartphone fingerprint scanners are still not secure enough

Smartphone fingerprint scanners are still not secure enough

Android just can't seem to get a break lately. After the really frightening Stagefright bug and then a slightly related vulnerability exposed by security firm Trend Micro, another component is being branded as insecure. Granted, it's not a widespread malady this time as only Android smartphones with fingerprint sensors are affected. Tao Wei and Yulong Zhang, both researchers from FireEye, are singling out the Samsung Galaxy S5 and HTC One Max as the most vulnerable examples of this case at the Black Hat security conference this week.

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Globalstar GPS network (allegedly) vulnerable to hackers

Globalstar GPS network (allegedly) vulnerable to hackers

Researcher Colby Moore will be presenting findings related to a security issue with the Globalstar satellite network at Black Hat in Las Vegas next week. The researcher found that devices using the Globalstar network reportedly can be fed false data or have their data transmissions intercepted. The type of system Globalstar reportedly uses is “kind of fundamentally broken from the get-go,” according to Moore. That's not the end of its problems, however.

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OwnStar gadget hacks GM’s OnStar to unlock, start cars

OwnStar gadget hacks GM’s OnStar to unlock, start cars

As cars get more sophisticated and more connected to the Internet, they also become more vulnerable to malicious attack. That truth has been demonstrated before and will be demonstrated again at the DefCon conference next week. Hacker Samy Kamkar has developed a small box, made from three radios and a Raspberry Pi, which, when within Wi-Fi range, can snoop in on a GM car owner's communication with his GM OnStar, hack into the computer system, and do all sorts of mayhem short of actually driving away with the car.

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