hacking

Blackshades hacking collective raided

Blackshades hacking collective raided

The hacking collective behind the remote access tool (RAT) called Blackshades has been raided by the FBI and applicable foreign law enforcement agencies. The raids are said by sources to be taking place at the homes of those involved with the software globally.

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AOL responds to widespread email spamming hack

AOL responds to widespread email spamming hack

If you’ve been receiving odd emails from an AOL email address, you’re not alone. A massive hack led to many accounts being compromised, used to send out spammy emails that included catchy headlines and suspect links. AOL has issued a response, saying their investigation ingot he matter is ongoing, and users should take steps to protect themselves.

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Kim Dotcom points out Cisco “backdoor” for law enforcement

Kim Dotcom points out Cisco “backdoor” for law enforcement

It would appear that Kim Dotcom does not trust United States-made electronics. He suggests this week that the world should "never trust US tech", using #NSA to point out a Cisco listing of lawful intercept architecture. He calls these systems "interception backdoors", suggesting that Cisco is amongst the companies that willingly allow the NSA to take hold of their data at any given time - but that's just not true.

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Apple unaffected by Heartbleed, adds to sites patched list

Apple unaffected by Heartbleed, adds to sites patched list

This week the folks at Apple have added to the stacks of sites making clear that they were either unaffected by the Heartbleed bug or have been patched successfully. Apple has released a statement that suggests they "take security very seriously" and that iOS and OS X "never incorporated the vulnerable software" in the first place. They also made clear that "key web-based services were not affected" either.

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Your Heartbleed bug fix in three steps

Your Heartbleed bug fix in three steps

This week there’s little question that the internet security world has been tossed down a flight of stairs. With Heartbleed, a relatively major bit of a mistake was made in OpenSSL, a form of security that most of the internet uses, resulting in a major open door for hackers and spies of all kinds. With this bug having only been discovered this week and implemented a whopping two years ago, IT professionals are notably miffed.

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Heartbleed bug coder: it was a mistake

Heartbleed bug coder: it was a mistake

There should have been little doubt that once the Heartbleed bug was realized, one of the first things the public was going to do was go on a witch hunt for the person or people responsible. As it were, Mr. Robin Seggelmann of Münster in Germany says that he was only aiming to improve OpenSSL, and all allegations that he may have introduced the bug on purpose are false.

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Heartbleed bug: vulnerable and patched sites chime in

Heartbleed bug: vulnerable and patched sites chime in

When you think about the scope of the Heartbleed bug, you have to consider that it was (and is) allowing hackers to see data - any data - stored on servers. This data vulnerable to CVE-2014-0160 (aka Heartbleed) is not limited to certain kinds of data - it’s anything and everything. So what’s to be done?

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Heartbleed test extension keeps hacker bug at bay

Heartbleed test extension keeps hacker bug at bay

Supposing you’re aware of the Heartbleed bug - which has been patched in many locations around the web already - you know that it’s a massive deal in the internet security universe. It’s left massive portions of the web open for hacking for two whole years, and it’s only being patched by most of the web this week. As luck would have it, there’s something you can do on your end this week as well to keep safe as an average web user.

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Heartbleed bug: how to avoid this massive web hack

Heartbleed bug: how to avoid this massive web hack

Since a fix was released yesterday, a bug has been crawling around the internet for a staggering two years. Introduced to glom on to the system known as OpenSSL back in December of 2011 and in the wild since Open SSL v1.0.1, this bug has been on the web since the 14th of March, 2012. But why was it only made apparent this week, and what can you do?

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