hackers

Heartbleed bug coder: it was a mistake

Heartbleed bug coder: it was a mistake

There should have been little doubt that once the Heartbleed bug was realized, one of the first things the public was going to do was go on a witch hunt for the person or people responsible. As it were, Mr. Robin Seggelmann of Münster in Germany says that he was only aiming to improve OpenSSL, and all allegations that he may have introduced the bug on purpose are false.

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Heartbleed bug: vulnerable and patched sites chime in

Heartbleed bug: vulnerable and patched sites chime in

When you think about the scope of the Heartbleed bug, you have to consider that it was (and is) allowing hackers to see data - any data - stored on servers. This data vulnerable to CVE-2014-0160 (aka Heartbleed) is not limited to certain kinds of data - it’s anything and everything. So what’s to be done?

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Snoopy drone pilfers smartphone data

Snoopy drone pilfers smartphone data

At the Black Hat Asia conference in Singapore next week, the folks behind a drone called Snoopy will showcase how they can intercept data from smartphones using their flying craft. The drone works by spoofing wireless networks and connecting to smartphones with the WiFi enabled, allowing them to remotely capture login credentials, personal data, and more.

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University of Maryland hacker nabs SS# trove

University of Maryland hacker nabs SS# trove

In a statement on the university's website today, University of Maryland President Wallace Loh revealed a security breach resulting in hundreds of thousands of compromised social security numbers, as well names, university IDs, and dates of birth. Calling it a "sophisticated computer security attack," Loh stated all relevant parties that have been issued a university ID since 1998 are at risk.

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Kickstarter hacked: credit cards safe, addresses and phone numbers lifted

Kickstarter hacked: credit cards safe, addresses and phone numbers lifted

This afternoon Kickstarter sent a message out to users detailing a hacker attack on their network. This network attack apparently had hackers given access to email addresses, mailing addresses, phone numbers, and encrypted passwords. Most (or all) users have also received a message that suggests no further action is needed on their part - but you do need to be aware of what this all means.

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