Hacker

LulzSec call it quits after 50 days of hacking and release AT&T docs on the way out

LulzSec call it quits after 50 days of hacking and release AT&T docs on the way out

The hacker group known as LulzSec set out on what they call a 50-day cruise. It was more like a 50-day hack fest where the group accessed all sorts of data and took sites offline. The data that the hackers accessed was released to the public for the most part. After the 50 days of hacking the group is now calling it quits. That is probably a good thing, I suspect with all the hacking going on and with some of the sites attacked being US government sites there will be some government-sponsored investigations going on.

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LulzSec Hacker Boat Sunk By Another Hacker Group?

LulzSec Hacker Boat Sunk By Another Hacker Group?

The "hacktivist" group called LulzSec has been wreaking havoc on websites and servers across the board over the last several weeks. Ever since the PlayStation Network breach, the group has been actively taking down gaming sites and even government agency sites including the CIA.gov and Senate.gov. They've certainly kept themselves in the headlines and are now drawing ire from other hackers.

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Sega Pass Gets Hacked, Accounts Compromised

Sega Pass Gets Hacked, Accounts Compromised

The myriad of cyber attacks of recent months in the wake of the PlayStation Network breach continue with the latest victim being Sega. The gaming network called Sega Pass, which includes its gaming forums and press resources websites got hacked yesterday, with the company sending out emails this morning to its Sega Pass users to confirm the network breach.

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LulzSec Hacks Bethesda Softworks And U.S. Senate

LulzSec Hacks Bethesda Softworks And U.S. Senate

The hacker group LulzSec is known for attacking sites more for fun and embarrassment rather than to steal and actually use the compromised personal data. The group has been staying in the headlines lately with attacks on the websites and servers of various prominent organizations including Sony, PBS, CodeMasters, and now game developer Bethesda Softworks and even the U.S. Senate.

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Police in Turkey pick up 32 people suspected of affiliation with hacker group Anonymous

Police in Turkey pick up 32 people suspected of affiliation with hacker group Anonymous

We mentioned last week that three people had been arrested and detained in Spain in connection with the attacks on Sony's networks. We have now learned that police in Turkey have detained 32 more suspects that the authorities believe are linked to Anonymous. The Turkish state-run news agency reports that the suspect were taken into custody by police after raids in dozens of cities it's not clear how the police linked the 32 people to the hacker group.

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Epic Games Website and Forums Hacked

Epic Games Website and Forums Hacked

Epic games, the developer of Gears of War, recently notified its forum members that its website and official forums had been hacked. With all the news about security breaches, it might be simpler to start announcing who has NOT been hacked. Not as serious as the attacks on Sony and Codemasters, the attackers were only able to obtain users email addresses and encrypted passwords. Fortunately no credit card numbers are stored on their sites, so none were obtained during the breach.

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LulzSec Takes Down Terrorist site Aljahad.com

LulzSec Takes Down Terrorist site Aljahad.com

LulzSec has taken its sights off Sony for a moment and directed its efforts at aljahad.com, a purported terrorist site. We don’t know the official definition of what constitutes a terrorist site, but after checking out aljahad.com it could certainly fit the bill. The Lulz Boat took credit for nuking the site, and added the taunt “ujelly.” Even though aljahad.com was only temporarily brought down, Props to the Lulz team. It isn’t often we see hackers spun positively in the news.

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Third Party Twitter Apps can Access Private Messages Without Your Authorization

Third Party Twitter Apps can Access Private Messages Without Your Authorization

Many third party apps ask your permission to access your Twitter account. If they are using OAuth, you might want to think twice. Most apps clearly state that they will not be able to access your private messages, when the truth is they actually can. With Wiener type stories in the news, this revelation is even more disconcerting. This privacy issue was outed by developer Simon Colijn who created a test application to prove that it exists.

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