hack

Google’s Project Zero posts Windows 8.1 flaw after 90-day grace period

Google’s Project Zero posts Windows 8.1 flaw after 90-day grace period

Project Zero, Google’s software vulnerability tracking program, has discovered another exploit. This time, they’ve come across one for Windows 8.1 that could give even the lowest-level users complete administrative control. Typically, Project Zero gives their discovery to the company who built the software so they can patch it up. The vendor has 90 days to fix it before Google releases their findings to the world. Microsoft didn’t act accordingly, and now we know all about it. Rather than a fix, Microsoft has excuses.

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BlackBerry the surprising savior for hacked Sony

BlackBerry the surprising savior for hacked Sony

A drawer of old BlackBerry phones unexpectedly helped keep Sony Pictures working, with staff resurrecting cast-aside tech and old-school methods to keep the hacked movie firm operational. Finding their own systems had been brought down by the hacking group known as "Guardians of Peace", Sony Pictures techs turned instead to BlackBerry's external servers, two new background pieces on the chronology of the cyberattack reveal, which kept email services running despite three-quarters of Sony's own servers having been destroyed.

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PSN, Xbox Live takedowns were ‘marketing scheme’, say hackers

PSN, Xbox Live takedowns were ‘marketing scheme’, say hackers

A Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attack is something that can have a ripple effect throughout the Internet, and typically not a good one. On Christmas Day, we saw both the PlayStation Network and Xbox Live go down — and with regard to the PSN, down hard. That was all a ‘marketing scheme’ according to the group claiming responsibility for it. "Just how is a DDoS a marketing ploy?", you might ask. As it turns out, the hacker crew behind the attacks are now selling their DDoS services.

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FBI gives Sony hack theories audience but no credence

FBI gives Sony hack theories audience but no credence

The FBI may be convinced that the Sony hack was the handiwork of North Korea, but not everyone is convinced, with private investigators briefing US security agencies on alternative explanations for the breach. Security firm Norse has joined a growing chorus of those who doubt the official account, describing the speedy assignment of blame on the secretive foreign state as a warning signal that a conclusion might have been rushed. While the FBI still insists Sony was the victim of a North Korea-led attack, it's nonetheless been open to hearing other viewpoints, Norse says.

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Snowden reveals how to go ‘level 5′, give the NSA fits

Snowden reveals how to go ‘level 5′, give the NSA fits

In the wake of Edward Snowden once again making revelations about the NSA’s widespread and troubling spying and information gathering, we’re getting a better idea of the lengths the United States Government agency went through to soak in knowledge. We’re also finding out how hard it can be to get the information they desire. Though a single “secure” system may be easy to crack, Snowden says a layering of several might actually render you totally safe from the prying eyes of big brother.

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Hacker claims he can steal fingerprints from public photos

Hacker claims he can steal fingerprints from public photos

Security is a big deal for users all around the world when it comes to keeping our personal information safe. In recent years, one of the more commons ways to secure mobile devices and computers is via a fingerprint. Fingerprints are good because they are easy to enter and everyone has a unique set. According to a Chaos Computer Club member, fingerprints may not be as secure as we all think.

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You can watch The Interview online now

You can watch The Interview online now

Controversial Sony Pictures movie The Interview has been released today across multiple streaming services, including Google Play, YouTube Movies, Xbox Video, and a dedicated site, its been announced. The film, starring Seth Rogen and James Franco, will be offered for rental or outright purchase. "It was essential for our studio to release this movie," Sony Pictures said today in a statement, "especially given the assault upon our business and our employees by those who wanted to stop free speech."

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Staples says 1 million cards fell victim to latest hack

Staples says 1 million cards fell victim to latest hack

Office goods retailer Staples recently saw themselves fall prey to hackers, much as Target, The Home Depot, and a laundry list of retailers ahead of them have. The company has now addressed the hack, saying that over one million unique cards were compromised. The hack also affected more than 100 point-of-sale systems at 1,400 stores. Staples didn’t say if the breach was nationwide, or if a specific geography was affected. The window for this hack was short, though, only lasting about a month.

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Obama: Sony pulling The Interview was “a mistake”

Obama: Sony pulling The Interview was “a mistake”

President Obama has criticized Sony for pulling The Interview following the hack blamed on North Korea, saying that while he is "sympathetic" to its losses, he nonetheless believes "they made a mistake." Describing cyber-security as an "urgent issue," Obama drew parallels between the Sony Pictures Entertainment hack and other, perhaps more traditional types of terrorism, including the Boston Marathon bombing. However, while Obama confirmed that some sort of response by the US was in order, he declined to give any specific details as to what that might be.

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FBI accuses North Korea of Sony hack

FBI accuses North Korea of Sony hack

The FBI has named North Korea as responsible for the Sony hack which saw huge quantities of secret documents and movie details stolen, and culminated in the pulling of contentious film The Interview from theatrical release. In a statement today - and ahead of a speech from President Obama expected later on - the FBI said its investigation with Sony Pictures Entertainment along with other agencies meant it "now has enough information to conclude that the North Korean government is responsible for these actions." Exactly what happens next is unclear, though the FBI says it intends to "impose costs and consequences" on any individual, group, or nation state which conducts cyber-terrorism against US businesses.

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