government

New radar lets law enforcement peek into homes

New radar lets law enforcement peek into homes

Privacy is a growing concern for many as technology -- and the snooping it enables -- continues to grow. It's no surprise, then, that concerns have been raised about a new radar technology that provides law enforcement agencies with the ability to "see" through the walls of one's home from the outside -- something sensitive enough to pick up breathing and motion, and to identify the approximate location of anyone inside. Police have been silently acquiring and utilizing the technology for more than two years, spurring complaints.

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Turkey threatens Twitter to censor nation’s newspaper account

Turkey threatens Twitter to censor nation’s newspaper account

It seems like it wasn't that long ago when the Turkish government was trying to make the social network services Twitter and YouTube illegal in the country for not playing along with their censorship requirements. Oh, wait, that's because it was less than a year ago. Well, Turkey is as at it again, this time threatening Twitter that it outright ban the site (again) if it doesn't censor the account belonging to a left-wing, opposition newspaper.

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President Obama calls for new federal laws on data security

President Obama calls for new federal laws on data security

President Obama thinks you should be protected if you’re connected. On Monday, the President called for the passing of the Personal Data Notification and Protection Act, which would require you to be notified within 30 days if a company you did business with as a consumer or professionally were breached. Secondly, the President wants access to your credit score to be simpler so you can manage your credit data should a hacker wreak havoc on your financial standing, giving you an early start on fixing the problems.

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White House sanctions North Korea in response to Sony hack

White House sanctions North Korea in response to Sony hack

In an apparent attempt to thwart future cyber attacks, the United states has issued sanctions against North Korea. The sanctions are a response to “ongoing provocative, destabilizing, and repressive actions and policies, particularly its destructive and coercive cyber attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment”. Sanctions are part of The White House’s previous statement that any response to North Korea regarding the Sony hack would be “proportional”, though the sanctions aren’t final. The White house is calling them the “first part” of a full response.

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Google transparency report details content govs wanted nixed

Google transparency report details content govs wanted nixed

Earlier today, Google published its latest transparency report, and as with past ones it includes information on government data requests from around the globe. One big difference, however, is the inclusion of more than two dozen examples of content removal requests received from governments -- a first for the transparency reports, and an interesting look at what kind of content catches the attention of various agencies and entities. The content removal requests are detailed for past periods in addition to the latest reported period from July to December 2013.

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NSA reveals how many times you’ve been spied on (sort of)

NSA reveals how many times you’ve been spied on (sort of)

While you and I were enjoying time with our families and suffering through Grandma’s stories, the NSA decided to let loose some of their family secrets. On Christmas Eve, long after we’d all checked out mentally in anticipation of Christmas, the NSA gifted us with a file dump of all the times they’ve illegally spied on us. If you’re thinking “oh, good, I’ll command-F for my name”, think again. The files are heavily redacted, and only discuss the instances of erroneous spying.

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Police can create fake Instagram accounts without warrant, says US judge

Police can create fake Instagram accounts without warrant, says US judge

A significant topic has developed over the last few months over the legality of whether law enforcement can create fake social network accounts to impersonate people for the purpose of trapping criminals. A new contribution to that discussion has been made after a US district judge said that police officers don't need to get search warrants in order to create a fake Instagram account and view the photos a suspect shares on the service. This decision will already have a direct effect on a case involving a suspect posting photos of stolen cash and jewelry.

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NSA reveals it used to have a “Clown Club”

NSA reveals it used to have a “Clown Club”

We've seen many NSA-related details surface, but none of them quite as unexpected as the latest revelation: the agency used to have a Clown Club. Less you think that is some cheery codename for a secret collective or program, it's not -- it was a literal Clown Club. It sounds almost too odd to be true, but the information was revealed by the NSA itself in an unclassified scan titled "Cryptologic Almanac 50th Anniversary Series" posted on its website. The club no longer exists, but its legacy apparently lives on.

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German Chancellor voices support for fast lane internet, opposing net neutrality

German Chancellor voices support for fast lane internet, opposing net neutrality

German leader Angela Merkel made comments earlier in the week on the topic of net neutrality, an important issue being discussed by a number of European governments, not to mention the U.S. Unfortunately for those in support of an internet with speeds unregulated by telecommunications companies, Chancellor Merkel doesn't feel the same, arguing instead for the controversial "two-lane" setup that has many users concerned.

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Justice Department eyeing cyber attack prevention with new unit

Justice Department eyeing cyber attack prevention with new unit

Following the massive attack against Sony Pictures and a recent warning from the FBI regarding malicious software, the Department of Justice has revealed plans to create a new unit in its criminal division that will, among other things, aid the private sector in preventing these kinds of cyber attacks in the future. The news was announced by a Justice Department official today, and aims to also ease public distrust of government surveillance efforts that has resulted following the Snowden revelations.

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