government

NSA can restart bulk data collection for 6 months, rules court

NSA can restart bulk data collection for 6 months, rules court

The American Civil Liberties Union is gearing up for a legal battle following a ruling yesterday evening by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court — according to it, the National Security Agency (NSA) can restart its bulk collection of American phone data. The ACLU is planning to challenge the ruling, and will be seeking an injunction against the program via the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Previously this court had ruled that the NSA’s bulk collection program was illegal.

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Gay Marriage Supreme Court ruling celebrated by tech brands and leaders alike

Gay Marriage Supreme Court ruling celebrated by tech brands and leaders alike

This morning the United States Supreme Court announced that same-sex marriage would be legalized across the USA. According to the official decision document, "The Court, in this decision, holds same-sex couples may exercise the fundamental right to marry in all States." In response, just about every tech company and brand associate have taken the opportunity to celebrate the decision with rainbow flags, jumps for joy, and everything in-between. Companies like Google, Motorola, and Twitter as well as high-profile leaders in tech like Apple's Tim Cook are amongst those joining in on the revels.

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Canadian government websites hit with cyberattack

Canadian government websites hit with cyberattack

Following disclosure of a massive breach of government data in the United States (and a second breach), word has surfaced that the Canadian government has undergone its own cyberattack. The attack targeted Canadian government websites and email systems, having been a denial of service attack against the nation's gc.ca server. The cyberattack was confirmed by Treasury Board President Tony Clement, and it affected several agencies in the nation’s government, including the websites of its Transport, Justice, Foreign Affairs, Industry, Employment, and Labor departments.

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US Navy caught soliciting for 0-day security bugs

US Navy caught soliciting for 0-day security bugs

The US government seems to really have a thing about backdoors, which doesn't sound good whether or not you have an overactive mind. It is almost understandable that the CIA and the NSA and the FBI would want such kind of access to software, but now even the Navy seems to be in on the scheme. Advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation or EFF discovered that the Navy posted, and later took down, an online solication that, in essence, was trying to buy zero or N day security bugs from widely used software.

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US officials reveal second massive hack: security clearance forms grabbed

US officials reveal second massive hack: security clearance forms grabbed

The recent hack of government data, at least according to those who know of the matter, is far worse than previously revealed. At least 4 million people were comprised, it was originally reported, but a recent letter to the OPM indicated that every single federal employee might have had some data stolen, including former federal workers. Now a second hack has been disclosed by sources, and it is said to have involved the theft of data related to intelligence employees and military personnel.

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OPM hack: all federal workers (possibly) had personal data stolen

OPM hack: all federal workers (possibly) had personal data stolen

Last week a massive data breach left the personal data on a reported four million federal employees compromised, but now word has it the hack was far larger in scope than previously revealed. In a recent letter it was stated that the personal data of every federal worker was stolen, as well as a large mass of details on former federal workers. The data taken is believed to be expansive, including things like health/life insurance info, pay data, military records, names, birth dates, and addresses, and more.

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US government to have all its websites begin using HTTPS

US government to have all its websites begin using HTTPS

As part of a new initiative to maintain security and privacy on its websites, both for users and itself, the U.S. government has announced a plan to make HTTPS a standard for all its public federal sites. The goal is to have all sites using HTTPS encryption by December 31, 2016. The White House is even sharing its proposed and final versions of the policy, posting both on Github, allowing the public to compare for themselves.

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NSA expanded warrantless internet surveillance in attempt to stop hackers

NSA expanded warrantless internet surveillance in attempt to stop hackers

New documents from Edward Snowden have revealed that since 2012, the US's National Security Agency has had an expanded ability to spy on Americans' internet data and communications, with no need to get a warrant. The documents were published in a New York Times article this week, and reveal that the NSA's goal is to find and stop hackers attempting cyberattacks from outside the country. Until now, this program was never disclosed to the public.

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Live anthrax was accidentally shipped to Canada, too

Live anthrax was accidentally shipped to Canada, too

A few days ago the Department of Defense announced that a government lab located in Dugway, Utah had accidentally sent live anthrax to nine labs located throughout the United States, as well as a joint military lab in South Korea. Those numbers have since grown. The Department of Defense and Centers for Disease Control have been investigating the matter, and there was (and still is) no known risk to the general population. Now it has been revealed that three labs located in Canada also received live anthrax shipments.

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IRS on hack: all signs point to Russia

IRS on hack: all signs point to Russia

Earlier this week, it was reported that the IRS had been hacked and the tax returns for more than 100,000 people were swiped. That reality has not changed, but now there’s a potential culprit: Russian hackers. The news was stated by Illinois Rep. Peter Roskam, who serves as the chairman of a House subcommittee that oversees the IRS. The news itself reportedly was given to him by IRS Commissioner John Koskinen, who relayed the breach’s Russian origins in a phone call.

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