Google IO

Google Glass color choices: will yours be custom coded?

Google Glass color choices: will yours be custom coded?

As Google's introduction of Glass as the premiere wearable face-based computer starts the world thinking about what they'll be placing on their head in the near future, so too do the creators of these machines begin to consider what forms they'll come in. When you create a device that rests on the temples of the user, you've got to consider more than just the components inside - color, comfort, and everyday usability are real concerns. Lead Industrial Designer for Google Glass Isabelle Olsson spoke up this month on the development of the final (and first) form of Google Glass, specifically on its first five colors.

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Google Glass team talks hardware principles: Lightness, Simplicity, Scalability

Google Glass team talks hardware principles: Lightness, Simplicity, Scalability

As a sort of a "Part 2" or even "Part 3" of the Glass chat series SlashGear has appearing this week and last, today's words with Google Glass' lead industrial designer Isabelle Olsson lend some insight on the device's road to final hardware. Speaking on how the original Glass prototypes eventually became the device you see today, Ollson shared three principles that allowed the team to solidify their process.

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Google Glass Original Prototype eyes-on with Isabelle Olsson

Google Glass Original Prototype eyes-on with Isabelle Olsson

At this years' Google I/O developers conference, a Fireside Chat with several members of the core Google Glass team proved to reveal much on not just the future of the device, but its origins as well. While earlier in the day a single slide had been shown depicting a set of six original prototypes of what was then called Project Glass, here lead industrial designer Isabelle Olsson had one key prototype on hand to show SlashGear in the plastic, as it were.

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Google Glass creators talk of final consumer device release

Google Glass creators talk of final consumer device release

As Google's first wearable computer Glass edges in past its initial run of devices, members of the general public begin to ask: when will the device be delivered in a form that any non-developers will be able to get their hands on? At a Google I/O 2013 "Fireside Chat" with several members of the main Google Glass team, this question was addressed more than once. In short: soon, but not nearly as soon as they'd like.

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Google I/O 2013 wrap-up: Expanding the Android Ecosystem

Google I/O 2013 wrap-up: Expanding the Android Ecosystem

Because Google's most popular operating system - and the most popular operating system on the planet, mind you - is Android, it only makes sense that much of the company's yearly developers conference would be centered in this multi-device environment. What we expected for this year's Google I/O was an upgrade to a new version of the mobile OS and a new device (or two) to run it on. Instead what we got was a major upgrade to Google's social networking connections and services working in and around Android - a turning point, perhaps, for the company in a single three-day series of events.

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Google I/O 2013 on-site Wrap-up: Glass, Developers, and Services on tap

Google I/O 2013 on-site Wrap-up: Glass, Developers, and Services on tap

It's a return to form here at Google I/O 2013, with none other than Google’s own Vice President of Android Product Management Hugo Barra letting us know that he'd personally fought hard for a more developer-focused single keynote address. As past years had been notably more consumer and product-focused than 2013, it's not a flash-bang the company has gone for here, it's a return to form: Google I/O in its purest form.

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Google Maps-driven Map Dive 3D-tracking hands-on

Google Maps-driven Map Dive 3D-tracking hands-on

This week the folks at the development studio known as Instrument have brought a virtual reality demonstration to Google I/O 2013, complete with a multi-display drop from the upper atmosphere down toward the earth in freefall. What this demonstration consisted of was seven 1080p displays, each of them run by their own Ubuntu PC working with a full-screen version of Chrome version 25. A motion tracker works to track the user, their arms, and the angle at which they're standing - or leaning and falling, as it were.

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Mary Lou Jepsen encourages Google X attitude in hardware engineering

Mary Lou Jepsen encourages Google X attitude in hardware engineering

This week at a fireside chat during Google I/O 2013, Mary Lou Jepsen - currently the head of the Display Division at Google X - let it be known that "there's no more silicon in Silicon Valley - it's all iPhone apps." She quickly added - "or Android apps, I should say." An overarching theme from her set of words in the extended chat made it clear: she's not satisfied with the current atmosphere for hardware innovation, particularly when it comes to startup funding.

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Google I/O and the year of the Context Ecosystem

Google I/O and the year of the Context Ecosystem

We went into Google I/O hoping for hardware and gadgetry; instead, we got three and a half hours of software and services - gaming, messaging, Larry Page wistfully envisaging a geeky utopia. You can perhaps excuse us for getting carried away in our expectations. I/O 2012 was a huge spectacle, with lashings of shiny new hardware only overshadowed by skydiving Glass daredevils and Sergey Brin looking moody on a rooftop. In contrast, 2013's event brought things a whole lot closer back to the developer-centric gathering that the show had originally been established as. Glass was conspicuous by its on-stage absence, and the new Nexus tablets that had been rumored were also no-shows; the emphasis was firmly on how the components of Google's software portfolio were being refined as the mobile and desktop battles waged on.

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