FTC

Google FTC fine over Safari breach could be $10 million+

Google FTC fine over Safari breach could be $10 million+

After the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) concluded that Google violated Internet privacy standards in the way that it interacted with Apple's Safari Web browser, the question is now how much the search giant will have to pay in fines. Based on the huge number of individual instances of privacy violations, Google could technically be forced to fork over millions and millions of dollars.

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FTC drafts hardcore litigator for Google antitrust grilling

FTC drafts hardcore litigator for Google antitrust grilling

Google faces an intense courtroom grilling over antitrust allegations, with the FTC retaining a notorious litigator in what observers say marks a "watershed moment" for online privacy regulation. The Federal Trade Commission turned to former Justice Department prosecutor Beth A. Wilkinson, famed in legal circles for her lead role convicting Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, the NYTimes reports, with suggestions that the Google case could have implications on a par with the Microsoft antitrust decisions of the 1990s.

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Google faces FTC fine for Safari tracking

Google faces FTC fine for Safari tracking

Google will reportedly be hit with a regulatory fine for bypassing Safari users' privacy settings. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will soon conclude its investigations and is expected to issue a fine within the next 30 days. The fine could be far greater than the $25,000 that Google was recently slapped with by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for privacy issues involving its Street View car.

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FTC echoes public siren call for De-Personalized Web

FTC echoes public siren call for De-Personalized Web

This week it's been made plain over and over again that the FTC is setting in motion the cogs which will eventually show the "Do Not Track" machine that the public has been waiting for since it became common knowledge that everyone is, indeed, being tracked basically all the time while online. The Federal Trade Commission's paper also echoes the White House call from a month ago to bring a new law into order which would serve as a Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights. This bill of rights will be the first giant blow against a vast undertaking created by several of the larger ad-slinging sites on the web which would have the common citizen's online actions tracked every second of every day in order to provide them with what's called, again, a "personalized experience."

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FTC Do Not Track paper suffers “opt-in” concern

FTC Do Not Track paper suffers “opt-in” concern

The FTC has released a paper this week which outlines how they'll be approaching a more private internet by the end of the year, the actions in this paper being approved by three out of four FTC Commissioners, Thomas Rosch being the most vocal of them all. As the lone FTC Commissioner who voted against the methods they'll be using throughout the year to ramp up to a "Do Not Track" button for web users by the end of 2012, Rosch made sure to be very clear on why he released a paper aside from the main announcement, saying "[it goes] well beyond what Congress has permitted the commission to do."

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FTC online privacy proposals slammed by activists

FTC online privacy proposals slammed by activists

Privacy advocates have slammed the new FTC "Do Not Track" guidelines, arguing that the proposed system for ensuring online data security fails to take advantage of existing authority and relies too muhc on self-regulation of the online industry. The new framework "mistakenly endorses self-regulation and 'notice and choice,'" the Electronic Privacy Information Center claims, "and fails to explain why it has not used its current Section 5 authority to better safeguard the interests of consumers."

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FTC “Do Not Track” paper parses Mobile Data as well

FTC “Do Not Track” paper parses Mobile Data as well

Today's announcement by the FTC that they're hoping for an expansion on the talks they've already had on a fully functional "Do Not Track" function for web-based data has had coverage focused on the desktop aspects on the whole thus far - but a mobile element looms. What will the FTC do about the undeniable masses of users out there today using the web with their smartphones, tablets, and in-betweens? As it turns out, they've addressed mobile in the same paper, though certainly in brief.

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FTC ‘Do Not Track’ system set for Winter 2012

FTC ‘Do Not Track’ system set for Winter 2012

The Federal Trade Commission this week has let known that they'll be showing the world a "Do Not Track" option for consumer data that companies will be encouraged to adopt across the board. This announcement comes amid a siren call from publishers and consumers alike that an "easy to use and effective" option for consumers is necessary in our very apt to track data use society of today. The White House as well earlier this year chimed in with a "privacy bill of rights" which may well have been the tipping point for the FTC in such matters.

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Google faces new investigation over Safari privacy breach

Google faces new investigation over Safari privacy breach

Google has run afoul of privacy regulations again, this time involving its breach of Apple's Safari Internet browser to track user activity. The news first broke when the WSJ reported that Google, along with a few other advertisers, had written a code to bypass Safari's default privacy controls, depositing cookies to track users' browsing habits in order to deliver targeted ads.

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Apple subpoenaed by FTC in Google antitrust probe

Apple subpoenaed by FTC in Google antitrust probe

As part of the investigation into antitrust allegations against Google, the FTC has subpoenaed Apple for details on the business relationship between the two tech companies. Apple currently uses Google as the default search engine on its iPhone and iPad under terms that rivals, such as Microsoft, believe are anti-competitive.

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