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SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: August 9, 2012

SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: August 9, 2012

Welcome to Thursday folks, just one more work day before arriving at the weekend. Today we had next to nothing about the Apple vs. Samsung trial, except for the news that a similar South Korean trial has been frozen for fear of it becoming too similar to the one being held here in the US. The lack of Apple vs. Samsung news leaves room for far more interesting things, however, like space! The Curiosity rover sent back a color panoramic shot of the surface of Mars along with its first full resolution image, and it's a pretty awesome sight. Sadly, it wasn't all exciting news for NASA today, as the Morpheus moon lander failed during a flight test and exploded into flames. Luckily no one was hurt, but this is still a pretty big setback for the folks at NASA.

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Google fine is FTC’s largest in history

Google fine is FTC’s largest in history

The largest fine ever levied against a company by the FTC has been drawn this week up against Google for their breach of Apple's Safari web browser. This situation has had Google and the FTC in talks for several weeks and involved a breaking of terms of consent by the search giant through Apple's software privacy settings. As the FTC calls it, Google's penalty is a "clear message" to all those companies looking to skip abiding by the FTC's orders in the USA.

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Google pays $22.5m in FTC Safari cookie fine

Google pays $22.5m in FTC Safari cookie fine

Google will pay a $22.5m fine to the FTC after tracking Safari browser users who had opted out of cookies, the largest fine ever levied by the Commission but still a drop in the internet ocean for the search giant. The settlement, rumored back in July, will also require Google to deactivate any tracking cookies inappropriately placed on users' computers, and is being described by the FTC as "a clear message" that privacy rules are inescapable.

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Google refuses wrongdoing vs Safari, privacy fine confirmed

Google refuses wrongdoing vs Safari, privacy fine confirmed

This week it's been a real all-out brawl very much behind the scenes when it's come to the FTC cutting down Google for their supposed privacy infractions with the Apple Safari web browser - and today they've spoken up. Google has sent out an extremely tiny statement to CNN which essentially has them refusing the idea that they did anything wrong as far as privacy is concerned with Apple's Safari browser. In addition, CNN has gotten some confirmation of the privacy fine Google faces, though they're currently unwilling to share their sources on the matter.

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Privacy advocates applaud incoming Google, FTC settlement

Privacy advocates applaud incoming Google, FTC settlement

The apparent incoming settlement between Google and the FTC is giving privacy groups a reason to celebrate today, as news of the possible $22.5 million deal is making headlines as the largest ever of its kind. Google, as many of you already know, is suspected of circumventing Safari's do-not-track settings and installing cookies on users' computers anyway, a revelation that did not sit too well with those who would prefer to have their surfing as private as possible. With a settlement likely in sight, privacy groups took time today to applaud the hefty fine the FTC imposed on Google for apparently ignoring Safari's settings.

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Twitter joins “Do Not Track”

Twitter joins “Do Not Track”

If you did not already know it, Twitter has been tracking your every move since the dawn of 140 characters, the FTC announcing just this week that they're now part of the "Do Not Track" initiative capturing the internet. This Do Not Track project has the Federal Trade Commission pushing for "opt-out" features on all web-based project that would otherwise track user data without question. Twitter is the latest group to join in on the Do Not Track fun with an option to turn off user tracking inside the Firefox web browser first and foremost.

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Facebook Instagram deal faces FTC delay

Facebook Instagram deal faces FTC delay

Facebook's $1bn acquisition of camera app Instagram could be delayed, insiders have suggested, with the US government investigation into the deal potentially causing the social network to miss its Q2 2012 deadline. Although a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) probe into any deal of this size is standard, two people familiar with the investigation tell the Financial Times that the Instagram deal could be under the microscope for anything from six to twelve months.

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Myspace settles FTC privacy charges

Myspace settles FTC privacy charges

Myspace may have lost out in the social networking wars to Facebook, but the company is still alive and kicking. It found itself in a spot of trouble with the FTC not too long ago regarding user privacy, with the company handing identifiable information over to advertisers. Yesterday Myspace settled the matter by agreeing to submit to privacy audits to be independently conducted over the next 20 years.

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Google FTC fine over Safari breach could be $10 million+

Google FTC fine over Safari breach could be $10 million+

After the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) concluded that Google violated Internet privacy standards in the way that it interacted with Apple's Safari Web browser, the question is now how much the search giant will have to pay in fines. Based on the huge number of individual instances of privacy violations, Google could technically be forced to fork over millions and millions of dollars.

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FTC drafts hardcore litigator for Google antitrust grilling

FTC drafts hardcore litigator for Google antitrust grilling

Google faces an intense courtroom grilling over antitrust allegations, with the FTC retaining a notorious litigator in what observers say marks a "watershed moment" for online privacy regulation. The Federal Trade Commission turned to former Justice Department prosecutor Beth A. Wilkinson, famed in legal circles for her lead role convicting Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, the NYTimes reports, with suggestions that the Google case could have implications on a par with the Microsoft antitrust decisions of the 1990s.

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