flight

Solar Impulse plane forced to land in Japan, ending flight across Pacific

Solar Impulse plane forced to land in Japan, ending flight across Pacific

The Solar Impulse 2 plane, a project that aims to have an aircraft powered only by solar energy fly around the world, was forced to cut short the Pacific Ocean leg of its journey due to bad weather. 36 hours after taking off from Nanjing, China, the aircraft, with only Swiss pilot André Borschberg on board, made an unexpected landing in the city of Nagoya, in central Japan. The Solar Impulse was supposed to go all the way to Hawaii, flying 120 hours non-stop, and in turn set a new world record for the longest flight of a solo aircraft.

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Experts say researcher’s in-flight hacking claims are dubious

Experts say researcher’s in-flight hacking claims are dubious

Making headlines yesterday, security researcher Chris Roberts is being investigated by the FBI for claiming the ability to mess with a plane's flight systems from onboard. An ill-received tweet started it all, as Roberts claimed he could hack his flight's oxygen regulation. Roberts went on to tell the FBI that he hacked en-route 15 to 20 times over the several years using his laptop, modified cables, and the in-flight entertainment systems. He even claimed to be able to access engine commands and make his plane move sideways. Industry experts are calling Roberts out on his claims, citing a range of reasons why his claims are dubious, if not impossible.

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United Airlines is offering 1 million miles in bug bounties

United Airlines is offering 1 million miles in bug bounties

Bug bounty programs are a great way for white-hat security researchers--hackers-- to earn extra cash. The best programs incentivize finding security flaws with cold, hard cash. On the other end of the spectrum, some companies only offer swag in return for finding flaws. A new set of bounties from United Airlines falls squarely in the middle. The company is offering airline miles in return for hunting security flaws. These miles aren't a measly upgrade from economy; you could earn some real travel time for uncovering a serious system flaw.

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Jetman and partner soar through Dubai’s skies with jetpacks

Jetman and partner soar through Dubai’s skies with jetpacks

Flying through the open skies using jetpacks is something almost all of us can only dream of or have only in movies. But these two daredevils have taken that dream and made it into reality. Swiss inventor and daredevil Jetman, known in real life as Yves Rossy, went to new heights, literally, as he took his new partner Vince Reffet through Dubai's skyline, flying over breathtaking scenery covering sand, water, and skyscrapers reaching to the high heavens. And, of course, they survived to tell the tale.

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Lawsuit seeking to ban in-flight gadgets gets dismissed

Lawsuit seeking to ban in-flight gadgets gets dismissed

Commercial airline passengers used to have to turn of their mobile devices before takeoff and landing, until a 2013 decision by the FAA finally allowed passengers to use mobile devices throughout entire flights. The freedom to play Angry Birds or tweet from takeoff was almost taken away by a 2014 lawsuit from the Association of Flight Attendants (AFA). That's right, if an army of flight attendants had their way, we would all be sitting in silence and twiddling our thumbs during every takeoff and landing.

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Amazon, JetBlue bring Prime Instant Video to you in-flight

Amazon, JetBlue bring Prime Instant Video to you in-flight

Have Amazon Prime? Love to travel domestically? We’ve got really good news for you. Amazon and US-based airline JetBlue have struck a deal that will bring Amazon Prime Instant video to you in-flight. Through those tiny displays in the headrest of the seat ahead of you (or your own tablet/smartphone), you’ll be able to watch Amazon Instant Video content just as you would at home. Instant Video is only available to Prime subscribers, not the pay-per-title viewing those without the $99/year plan often seek out.

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Flying car maker AeroMobil: flying cars to take off 2017

Flying car maker AeroMobil: flying cars to take off 2017

While some car companies are still scrambling to develop self-driving cars or at least integrate smartphones into the dashboard, some are already look far ahead into the future and into the skies. But for AeroMobil, who has been working on flying cars since 1989, it might not actually be too far into the future at all. It believes that by 2017, the first commercial flying car will be available to the highest bidder. But considering its business revolves around flying cards, it's not hard to see why AeroMobil would be so optimistic.

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Google flight searches to show if WiFi, power outlets available

Google flight searches to show if WiFi, power outlets available

With in-flight WiFi becoming more and more common, and recent regulation changes allowing the use of personal devices during take-off and landing, air travel has become that much more tech-friendly to travelers. However, it's still pretty much a toss-up if your airline or flight will have amenities like WiFi or in-seat power outlets available for you to use. But thanks to a new partner ship between Google and Routehappy, checking the availability of these services while planning your trip is now just a bit easier.

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DALER: vampire-inspired robot can fly and walk

DALER: vampire-inspired robot can fly and walk

This robot can crawl around on all fours - and it can fly. If you're terrified at the possibility that the future will be run by a robot race that's far superior to humankind thanks to their ability to both walk and fly, turn back now. What we're seeing here is the future of transformer-like technology, bringing LIS, EPFL, and NCCR Robotics together to bring home the gold with a winged metal creature that can crawl. This is DALER, otherwise known as the Deployable Air-Land Exploration Robot, and it's been inspired by a vampire bat.

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Biodegradable drone is designed to melt away if it crashes

Biodegradable drone is designed to melt away if it crashes

The drone you see in the picture here is unique in that it is designed to dissolve over time if it crashes or is abandoned in the environment. It’s made from a material called mycelium, which is a root-like fungus. The fungus material is coated in a plant-based cellulose to make it sturdy enough for flight. Inside the biodegradable enclosure, the circuitry is also designed to melt away over time.

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