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Chrome for Android won’t ever get Flash

Chrome for Android won’t ever get Flash

Chrome for Android may have set its sights on being the default browser on your Ice Cream Sandwich smartphone, but you'll have to make do with no Flash Player support if you give in to the new beta's allure. Having announced that its Flash Player mobile plans were over back in NovemberAdobe has confirmed that Chrome for Android does indeed arrive too late for a plugin of its own. That's despite Android 4.0 already having Flash Player support in the native browser.

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Apple’s Anobit flash specialist deal final

Apple’s Anobit flash specialist deal final

Apple's acquisition of flash memory specialist Anobit has apparently been finalized, reports from Israel suggest, with the NAND controller company's tech used to boost capacity, performance and reliability of storage in future smartphones, tablets and notebooks. Initially rumored earlier this month, the Anobit buy has now gone through for roughly $400-500m Calcalist reports. Apple could also use the buy to set up an Israel-based R&D center, it's suggested.

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Apple buying Anobit performance flash specialist tips report

Apple buying Anobit performance flash specialist tips report

Apple has reportedly bought Israeli flash memory specialist Anobit, in a $400-500m deal for the NAND company's proprietary performance technology. Anobit is a fabless semiconductor company which apparently already counts Apple among its clients, Calcalist reports, using embedded flash controllers in devices like the iPhone, iPad and MacBook Air. The acquisition would presumably give Apple greater control over high-performance solid-state memory, as the Cupertino company is expected to shift to in its MacBook Pro range over the next few years.

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Galaxy Nexus getting Flash and AIR support come December

Galaxy Nexus getting Flash and AIR support come December

We knew that Adobe was on track to roll out Adobe Flash support for Android 4.0 (and in particular, the Samsung Galaxy Nexus) before the end of this year but, at that time, we didn't know the exact month, whether it'd be either November or December. Now, fast forwarding to today, Adobe has just tied up a couple loose ends and confirmed that Adobe Flash Player 11.1 and Adobe AIR 3.1 will both be heading to the Galaxy Nexus (and thus Android 4.0) at some point next month in December.

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Flash for Android 4.0 by end of 2011 says Adobe

Flash for Android 4.0 by end of 2011 says Adobe

Adobe will deliver a version of Flash Player mobile for Android 4.0 by the end of the year, the company has confirmed, meaning smartphones like the Galaxy Nexus will be able to play Flash games and animations in the browser. Flash Player's current incompatibility  with Ice Cream Sandwich was spotted shortly after the Galaxy Nexus' launch, with Google only saying that "it expected" Adobe to release an updated version. However, Adobe also confirmed to Pocket-lint that this new version will be its last for the platform.

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No Flash at launch for Ice Cream Sandwich

No Flash at launch for Ice Cream Sandwich

If you lucky owners of the Galaxy Nexus in these first days of its release complete with the first iteration of Ice Cream Sandwich, you'll notice that you do not have Adobe Flash Player installed, nor do you have access to a download on the Android Market - Google has just confirmed with us that this is normal and that Flash support will only come once Adobe makes the call to update the mobile version for Android 4.0. You currently will not have the ability to load either a new version or one of the older versions of Flash Player for Ice Cream Sandwich until Adobe makes the call to update their app to be compatible with this newest version of Android. Don't get too frazzled quite yet though, that's not the whole story.

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Adobe yanks Flash Smart TV strategy but RIM won’t let go

Adobe yanks Flash Smart TV strategy but RIM won’t let go

Adobe isn't just axing Flash Player for Mobile, but refocusing its approach toward smart TV as well, pushing native apps rather than Flash compatibility. Although the company will continue to support existing licensees of its Open Screen Project, an Adobe spokesperson told GigaOM, it now believes "the right approach to deliver content on televisions is through applications, not a web browsing experience." Meanwhile, RIM has confirmed that it will independently develop Flash for the BlackBerry PlayBook, telling AllThingsD that it has licensed Adobe's source code.

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Flash Flushed: Adobe confirms HTML5 mobile focus

Flash Flushed: Adobe confirms HTML5 mobile focus

Adobe has announced that it will no longer develop Flash Player for mobile devices, confirming rumors that it is shifting to HTML5 as its mobile platform of choice. "HTML5 [is] the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms" Adobe VP Danny Winokur said on the company's official blog, and the firm will work "with key players in the HTML community, including Google, Apple, Microsoft and RIM" to drive the standard further.

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Adobe to trash Flash Player Mobile

Adobe to trash Flash Player Mobile

Adobe is reportedly preparing to announce it is ditching Mobile Flash development, with no further plans to push Flash Player for mobile devices. The decision, revealed to ZDNet by sources close to Adobe, will mean an end to the ongoing argument over whether Flash support on smartphones and tablets is a benefit to end-users or a hinderance, something which saw Adobe and Apple lock horns on a number of occasions. Moving forward, Adobe will concentrate on Flash on the desktop and using Adobe AIR and HTML5 for mobile deployments.

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Sony PS Vita browser won’t support Flash at launch

Sony PS Vita browser won’t support Flash at launch

According to a report from Japanese publication Weekly Famitsu, the web browser on Sony's next-generation portable gaming device, the PlayStation Vita, will not support Adobe Flash at launch. It will support cookies, JavaScript 1.7, and some HTML5, but Flash didn't make the list. Also not supported are Game Archives that include classic PlayStation One games.

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