fitness

Withings Activite up for pre-order, will cost $450

Withings Activite up for pre-order, will cost $450

In combining two worlds, making an analog watch with some health monitors embedded, Withings is straddling a line nobody else is. The French fitness device maker is taking a Swiss-made watch, combining some fitness sensors, and including it all in one handsome device. The Withings Activite is now up for pre-order, but might set you back a bit more than imagined. At $450, it’s a good sight more than other wearables it competes with, but still holds a distinct edge in one regard.

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Jawbone UP3 hands-on – Smarter sensing, cleverer coaching

Jawbone UP3 hands-on – Smarter sensing, cleverer coaching

If you're going to ask someone to wear a fitness tracker 24/7, it better be good, and Jawbone believes its come up with a killer in the new UP3. It's 30-percent smaller than Jawbone's old flagship, with a new design from Yves Behar, but this is no simple remolding of an UP24, however. Instead, it's the launch vehicle for the company's new multi-sensor platform, stepping beyond the simple accelerometer found in most wearables and adding a new bioimpedance sensor among others for not only movement, sleep, and heart tracking, but the promise of even more in-depth metrics that can be unlocked with a simple firmware update. I stopped by Jawbone to find out why UP3 could put other wearables to shame.

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Jawbone UP MOVE – Body tracking for the mass market

Jawbone UP MOVE – Body tracking for the mass market

Jawbone has clearly taken leave of its senses, if the new UP MOVE is anything to go by. Taking the fitness and sleep tracking that made the UP24 a hit, and then packaging it in a tiny clip-on dongle with six month battery life, the UP MOVE not only promises liberation away from the charger but at a fraction of the UP24's price. $49.99 gets you the sort of wearable tracking abilities that, not long ago, would've cost you three times the amount. I caught up with Jawbone to find out what the big idea is, and why luxury cars might represent the best explanation for the UP MOVE.

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Jawbone MOVE and UP3 trackers tipped inbound

Jawbone MOVE and UP3 trackers tipped inbound

Following closely on the heels of Microsoft's new fitness tracker Band comes word that Jawbone has a couple new -- and cheaper -- devices up its own sleeve. One of these devices is called the "MOVE", and it will cost $50 according to The Information, where the tip surfaced. The second device will reportedly be called the UP3, and it will be more expensive, priced at $180 USD, just barely undercutting the Band and proving more expensive than the company's other UP products.

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Microsoft Band vs the Wearable Competition

Microsoft Band vs the Wearable Competition

You'd need a very big wrist to wear this year's crop of fitness bands and smartwatches, but Microsoft believes the new Microsoft Band can elbow out the competition. Straddling the line between smartwatch and health tracker - not to mention spanning not only Windows Phone but iPhone and Android, in a play for cross-compatibility that rivals could learn a lesson from - the sensor-packed wearable claims to deliver the best of both worlds. In the process, though, Microsoft has arguably given itself double the challenge, so I pulled up my sleeves to see how the Microsoft Band holds up.

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Microsoft Band hands-on – Admirably Flexible Fitness

Microsoft Band hands-on – Admirably Flexible Fitness

Who would've thought it would be Microsoft that would embrace cross-platform wearables so thoroughly, and indeed first. Microsoft Band is, on the face of it, the company's play for the fitness and health market, trailing Android Wear to market but beating Apple Watch by a number of months. However, where Google and Apple's approaches are resolutely wedded to their own individual platforms, Microsoft has spread wide its arms and made Microsoft Band play nicely not only with Windows Phone but with Android and iPhone too, and you don't have to sacrifice 99-percent of the functionality in doing so. I strapped the rubberized, touchscreen-toting health band to my wrist to find out more.

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Microsoft Band wearable is official and available now

Microsoft Band wearable is official and available now

Microsoft's hotly anticipated wearable had a rocky unveiling today, popping up first via its mobile apps rather than in anything official. The company has wasted little time, however, and has officially taken the wraps off its fitness wearable: the Microsoft Band. Named such for its wristband design, no doubt, the Band is a fitness tracker with an edge, able to both keep tabs on your activities and your digital life. As the apps indicated earlier this evening, the wearable works alongside the Microsoft Health platform and in conjunction with a handful of different partners.

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Microsoft Band wearable surfaces early in app releases

Microsoft Band wearable surfaces early in app releases

For reasons unknown, a trio of Microsoft apps have arrived in the big three app stores, with the Apple version in particular showing off a wearable called "Band" that is, presumably, the device expected to launch officially in the near future. Not much is revealed by the three app listings, though an official look at the product is certainly nothing to complain about. What we do see, however, follows nicely alongside the details that have surfaced over past months through different sources, the particulars of which we have after the jump.

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iHealth Edge fitness tracker arrives in the US

iHealth Edge fitness tracker arrives in the US

iHealth Lab's Edge health tracker has officially launched in the United States, bringing yet another activity-centric wearable to a market that doesn't yet have enough of them. The wearable features a design similar to a smartwatch, though it can also be worn as a clip-on for times that is more convenient. As with competing products, the Edge keeps track of all sorts of health metrics, not the least of which is fitness data like calories burned and information related to one's sleep quality at night.

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Fitbit adds GPS and heart-rate tracking in wearable refresh

Fitbit adds GPS and heart-rate tracking in wearable refresh

Fitbit has revealed a trio of new fitness tracking wearables, the Charge, Charge HR, and Surge, promising not only health monitoring but Caller ID and sleep pattern tracking. Launching today in the case of the Fitbit Charge, and in early 2015 for the other models, each has a display - OLED on the Charge and Charge HR, and an LCD touchscreen on the Surge smartwatch - and up to a full week of battery life, the company claims. Meanwhile, there's also the promise of access to the heart rate and GPS data collected by the three, though the Fitbit API.

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