fitness

Garmin HRM-Tri and HRM-Swim heart rate monitors work in water

Garmin HRM-Tri and HRM-Swim heart rate monitors work in water

Heart rate monitors have been around for years that make it easy to keep track of your heart rate while you walk or run. What has been hard to do is keep an eye on your heart rate while swimming. Garmin has now unveiled its first underwater heart rate monitors that are designed to add minimal drag. There are versions of the new heart rate monitor for the water aimed at swimmers and triathletes.

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Acer Liquid Leap+ fitness tracker launches in US

Acer Liquid Leap+ fitness tracker launches in US

Acer has launched its first fitness tracker in the United States, its Liquid Leap+ wearable. The tracker features interchangeable bands and is compatible with the three big mobile platforms: Android, iOS, and Windows Phone. The Liquid Leap+ isn’t new, but rather is new to the US market, and is aimed at those who want a waterproof wristband for keeping tabs on the activities that happen throughout the day. Unlike some similarly styled fitness bands, the Leap+ has a small OLED display.

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This futuristic exoskeleton convinced me to take aging seriously

This futuristic exoskeleton convinced me to take aging seriously

One day you will die, but, before then - and assuming all goes to plan - you’ll be trapped in an old body. Failing eyesight, hearing plagued with tinnitus, and limbs progressively seizing until just getting up from your chair is a challenge too great: death may be considered the biggest taboo, but aging is arguably a more uncomfortable one. With all that to look forward to, it’s no surprise that nobody wants to talk about getting old. Could a futuristic exoskeleton kick-start that conversation?

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Moov Now fitness wearable debuts from ex-Apple alum

Moov Now fitness wearable debuts from ex-Apple alum

Fitness wearables are very popular with all sorts of them on the market from smartwatches like the Apple Watch to simpler devices like the Fitbit. A new fitness wearable has debuted from an ex-Apple alumni called the Moov Now. The device bills itself as the most advanced AI powered wearable that is able to analyze movement in real-time and coach the wearer to better performance.

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HTC Grip shelved as HTC rethinks wearable plans

HTC Grip shelved as HTC rethinks wearable plans

If you were eager to strap the much-awaited HTC Grip fitness band to your wrist, prepare for disappointment, as the wearable has been put on ice. Announced back at Mobile World Congress in March, the Grip was to be the first fruits of HTC's new collaboration with Under Armour, collecting health stats and serving them up through a monochrome touchscreen. However, HTC now says, "extensive wear testing and user feedback" has forced a rethink.

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Microsoft Band lets users create web tiles via RSS feeds

Microsoft Band lets users create web tiles via RSS feeds

Microsoft is continuing to add new functionality to its Band wearable and push what the device is capable of. Following the release of a SDK and adding fitness tracking for activities like cycling and golf, Microsoft is now letting anyone create apps for the Band in the form of web tiles. As part of a preview program aimed at developers, these mini-apps will display any data that's available on the web through an RSS feed.

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Upcoming Microsoft Band update to add golf tracking capabilities

Upcoming Microsoft Band update to add golf tracking capabilities

Now roughly 9 months old, Microsoft's Band fitness wearable is getting an update that will add support for tracking a new activity: your golf game. Microsoft has just announced a new partnership with golf company TaylorMade, and with that an update to the Band and Health app to track a number of golfing stats, including shots, scorecard, and hole distances. The update is said to be available in the "coming weeks," and will also include new stat tracking for workouts and cycling in the Health app.

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Pivotal Tracker 1 (2nd Gen) fitness tracker review

Pivotal Tracker 1 (2nd Gen) fitness tracker review

We all know the big names in fitness and sleep trackers. Just about everywhere you look you can find someone wearing a Jawbone wristband or a FitBit tracker. Those trackers are on the pricier side of things, however, and not everyone is willing to spend that much on tech that might -- like their last gym membership -- end up going unused. Enter the budget tracker market where Xiaomi's Mi Band largely goes unchallenged. Late last year a company called Pivotal Living based out of Seattle, Washington introduced an even more budget-friendly option, at least for the short term: its Pivotal Tracker 1 wearable, which is free if you sign up for a year's membership at $12.

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Jawbone takes another hit at Fitbit, filing patent infringement suit

Jawbone takes another hit at Fitbit, filing patent infringement suit

Jawbone is coming for Fitbit, guns blazing. The company just filed a lawsuit alleging that Fitbit products are infringing on multiple Jawbone patents including a method for "reporting an individual's physiological or contextual status" and a "wellness application using data from a data-capable band." Jawbone is seeking damages and an injunction to halt the continued sales of Fitbit products. Jawbone's attacks couldn't be more precisely timed. Fitbit is getting ready for an initial public offering (IPO). No matter how things take a turn int he courtroom, the legal heat will certainly have some impact on Fitbit's IPO.

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Wearables and Fitness – Is it a permanent union?

Wearables and Fitness – Is it a permanent union?

We see wearables on the rise. But when we says "wearables", we mostly mean smartwatches and, more often and more ubiquitous, fitness bands. While the term "wearable" itself seems to cover a whole swathe of products, why is it that most, if not all, wearables in the market are those that we can only wear on our wrists? And why are almost all of them, even those that we don't wear on our wrists, seem to be focused, if not totally dedicated to fitness and health? Are wearables fated to be tethered to this particular use case?

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