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FCC proposal frowns upon robotexts and robocalls

FCC proposal frowns upon robotexts and robocalls

Robocalls are a no-no in most places, and robotexts are treated largely the same way. That doesn’t stop them from happening, however, and so the FCC would like to see options for consumers to block them entirely. As such, the commission has proposed changes to the auto-dialing rules, and it’ll be voting on the proposal the middle of next month. Under it, service providers will be able to offer “technologies” of some sort for blocking the robocalls if they’re unwanted, as well as robotexts in the case of wireless carriers.

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Time Warner Cable rumored to be acquired by Charter for $55B

Time Warner Cable rumored to be acquired by Charter for $55B

While the talks of a merger with Comcast have only just subsided following regulators' disapproval, it appears that Time Warner Cable has already found another suitor. In a new report from Bloomberg this week, TWC is said to be nearing an acquisition deal with Charter Communications worth roughly $55 billion in cash and stocks. The deal, which could be announced as early as Tuesday, is also said to include Charter's $10.4 billion purchase of smaller cable TV provider Bright House Networks, a deal that was made prior to the TWC talks.

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Sprint and Verizon settle FCC’s cramming charges for $158 million

Sprint and Verizon settle FCC’s cramming charges for $158 million

Verizon and Sprint have settled with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) over a series of unauthorized customer charges. The government probe alleged that Sprint and Verizon charged customers subscription fees for third-party services such as horoscope, or daily humor services. Although the lawsuits have only just now been settled, the companies were asked to halt their dubious "premium short message services" back in late 2013. The unauthorized subscriptions were about $9.99 per month, and Sprint and Verizon typically took a forty percent cut from each "crammed" charge.

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FCC marches on with open internet rules, AT&T stay denied

FCC marches on with open internet rules, AT&T stay denied

AT&T and fellow telecom companies are trying to prevent the FCC from rolling out new Net Neutrality rules. The telecom companies' latest strategy to slow down the new regulation process from taking effect was to request a stay, which would delay the reclassification of internet as a public utility. The court officially denied the stay in its latest ruling. The telecom companies claimed that because they didn't seek a say request against the three "bright-line" internet rules from the FCC's new Internet regulation, (no throttling, no paid prioritization, and no obstruction of legal content) their stay would not harm the public interest. Yet, the court failed to agree.

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Comcast has killed the Time Warner Cable merger

Comcast has killed the Time Warner Cable merger

Comcast has pulled the plug on its merger plans with Time Warner Cable, after the government refused to let up on monopoly concerns. The failure of the agreement - along with Comcast's transactions agreement with Charter Communications, Inc., which is also a victim of the deal's demise - was rumored earlier this week, amid ongoing speculation that the US Department of Justice was building a case against the merger on the grounds that it would not be in the best interests of consumers.

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Net Neutrality under fire as big telcos start shouting

Net Neutrality under fire as big telcos start shouting

Net neutrality may have been settled by the FCC, but bang on time for the proposed rules being published a group of broadband bigwigs have fired back with a lawsuit. The Federal Communications Commission first revealed it wanted to classify the internet as a utility back in February, following that up with the 400 page rulebook that, among other things, outlined exactly what expectations users could have. Now, with those rules officially proposed, telecoms firms are firing back with all legal barrels.

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AT&T and FCC settle after call center workers sold customer data

AT&T and FCC settle after call center workers sold customer data

AT&T has paid $25 million to settle a case with the Federal Communications Commission, it has been announced. The reason revolves around a privacy breach concerning the service provider, which is said to have had confidential customer data leaked via its call center workers to third-party resellers. The reason was so that the resellers could unlock the used phones they acquired, according to the FCC. This is said to have included some pretty serious data disclosures, including giving away subscribers' Social Security numbers.

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Roku tipped to release two revised streaming boxes in April

Roku tipped to release two revised streaming boxes in April

It appears streaming video hardware maker Roku is close to releasing two new models, if a recent FCC filing is to be believed, that is. Fans shouldn't get their hopes up too high, however, as it appears these boxes are to be slight revisions of the existing Roku 2 and Roku 3 models. Other evidence is pointing towards a mid-April release, which means this is most likely a response to the Apple TV recently dropping to $69.

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First lawsuits against FCC’s net neutrality are filed

First lawsuits against FCC’s net neutrality are filed

The FCC just announced its ruling on net neutrality last month, and lawsuits are hitting the agency right off the bat. The FCC declared that the Internet is a utility, which allows the government to regulate it. As such, the FCC created net neutrality rules which treat all web traffic equally. Well, no one likes being told what to do, especially by the government. The telecom industry is up in arms over the FCC's net neutrality ruling, and now the lawsuits are beginning to trickle in. These lawsuits are part of an industry-wide effort to overturn what private companies believe are the FCC's unlawful regulations.

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Verizon settles with FCC over last year’s 911 outage

Verizon settles with FCC over last year’s 911 outage

In April of last year, multiple states experienced 911 service outages, and as part of that Verizon in particular had an outage in California that affected about 750,000 people and 13 different call centers. The outage took place for several hours, and Verizon did not notify officials about it as it was required to do. This spurred an investigation into the matter, something that has been going on for a while now and that was recently settled between the two entities.

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