FBI

Leaked Apple IDs didn’t come from FBI after all

Leaked Apple IDs didn’t come from FBI after all

By now, many of you probably know about last week's AntiSec hack. The group claimed to have stolen 12 million Apple UDIDs - 1 million of which were posted to Pastebin - from the computer of an FBI agent. At the time, the FBI said that it didn't have any involvement in the hack, and that AntiSec had made the whole story up. While that seemed like just an FBI attempt to distance itself from the breach, it turns out that the FBI was telling the truth - at least when it comes to whether or not the information was stolen from an FBI computer.

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SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: September 4, 2012

SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: September 4, 2012

We're getting ready to end a Tuesday that has produced some rather big news, so let's jump right into it, shall we? By far the biggest story of the day had to do with upcoming the Apple event. Apple started sending out invitations for the event today, using a picture that gives away what to expect at the event (spoiler alert: the iPhone 5 is coming). With an iPhone 5 reveal essentially confirmed, analysts are predicting success for the new handset, saying that it could potentially sell 10 million units this quarter. Not bad, provided the device actually hits those marks.

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Department of Justice, FBI seize three Android pirate sites

Department of Justice, FBI seize three Android pirate sites

The federal government has continued its crack down on piracy, with the Department of Justice announcing that three different sites which market pirated Android apps have been shut down. The websites in question - applanet.net, appbucket.net and snappzmarket.com - are now all under the government's control, and all three display the same copyright notice that has graced Megaupload for the better part of the year. The DoJ says that this is the first time any websites relating to pirated mobile apps have been shut down.

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FBI files finally go digital

FBI files finally go digital

The US Federal Bureau of Investigation or FBI has finally gone digital with its files, and the effort spanned 12 years. The digital system that the FBI has in place cost over $600 million and will see agents using a new computer system rather than paper files during investigations. The system the FBI has implemented is called Sentinel.

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Former FBI agent urges hackers to help US fend off cyber-threats

Former FBI agent urges hackers to help US fend off cyber-threats

As the world becomes more and more connected, the United States obviously faces threats that are purely cyber in nature. During his keynote at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas today, former FBI agent Shawn Henry made a point of discussing cyber-threats and how the US government can defend against them. The government can't do it alone, however, which is why Henry called on hackers with the know-how to help the country out when it comes to fending off cyber-attacks.

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FBI investigating ZTE over surveillance equipment deal with Iran

FBI investigating ZTE over surveillance equipment deal with Iran

ZTE is fast expanding its portfolio to Europe and the United States, but the Chinese company has now come under scrutiny from the FBI over reports that it sold computer equipment from American companies to Iran. According to a document obtained by The Smoking Gun, ZTE is trying to cover up details of a $130 million transaction with Iran that saw the Chinese company selling sophisticated surveillance equipment.

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FBI rations Dotcom Megaupload evidence access

FBI rations Dotcom Megaupload evidence access

Back in May, the judge presiding over the extradition case between Kim Dotcom and the US government ruled that Dotcom was allowed access to the files and information that the FBI held on him. Lawyers from both sides met yesterday to argue exactly what would be handed over, the result being a 40-page document compiled from 22 million emails obtained by the FBI.

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FBI to kill servers supporting DNSChanger virus victims

FBI to kill servers supporting DNSChanger virus victims

Hundreds of thousands of people around the world could lose access to the Internet on July 9 when the FBI plans to kill temporary servers servicing victims of a virus. That virus is called DNSChanger, and the FBI plans to shut down the temporary DNS servers that were being used to assist victims of the Internet theft ring. Any computer that still uses the servers won't be able to go online starting July 9.

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