facial recognition

Smart object-recognition system could spy on your milk in the IoT

Smart object-recognition system could spy on your milk in the IoT

Computers that can identify objects without requiring any human training are now a possibility, as researchers figure out how to teach AIs to intuit the key features and differences between faces, objects, and more. The new algorithm, developed by engineer Dah-Jye Lee of Brigham Young University, avoids human calibration by instead giving computers the skills to learn how to differentiate themselves: so, rather than the operator flagging individual differences between, say, a person and a tree, the computer is given the tools to identify the differences on its own, and then use them moving forward.

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LifeLogger wearable camera spots faces, speech & text: Hands-on

LifeLogger wearable camera spots faces, speech & text: Hands-on

Anybody can clip on a camera and call it a life-logger, but startup LifeLogger says its wearable goes the extra mile with its combination of face, text, and even audio recognition to make reviewing your "augmented memory" more meaningful. Showing at CES 2014 this week, LifeLogger's approach consists of a tiny, gum-packet sized stick camera weighing around 9g and which can record 720/30p HD video as well as stills, and a companion cloud service that does the heavy lifting by processing all that recorded content and allowing you to make better sense of it. We grabbed some hands-on time at the show to find out more.

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Facebook’s facial recognition policy changes draw attention from German data commissioner

Facebook’s facial recognition policy changes draw attention from German data commissioner

Facebook kicked off a new series of proposed policy changes on August 29, and among them has been the addition of facial recognition in its data protection policy for its European users. Such has drawn the attention of the Hamburg data protection commissioner, which had dropped legal proceedings against the social network late last year after it deactivated facial recognition in the EU and promised to delete its templates.

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Face-recognition fooling Privacy Visor disguises with light

Face-recognition fooling Privacy Visor disguises with light

Glasses that prevent the wearer from being recognized by face detection software have been demonstrated in Japan, using LED light invisible to the human eye but confusing to monitoring cameras to mask identity. The privacy visor, under development by Isao Echizen's team at the Japanese National Institute of Informatics, works by packing a pair of glasses with eleven near-infrared lights, the positioning of which cancels out the normal characteristics that facial-detection relies upon.

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FTC offers best practices recommendations for facial recognition technologies

FTC offers best practices recommendations for facial recognition technologies

The FTC has offered recommendations on best practices for companies that are using facial recognition technologies. The recommendations are offered in a new staff report titled "Facing Facts: Best-kept practices for, and Uses of Facial Recognition Technologies." The report is intended to help companies that use facial recognition to protect consumers' privacy as they use the technology to create products and services.

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