face recognition

Simplicam tackles Dropcam with face-detection

Simplicam tackles Dropcam with face-detection

Wireless security cameras like Dropcam are shaping up to be an integral part of the smart home experience, and ArcSoft is hoping its Simplicam will carve a niche courtesy of face detection. A compact WiFi camera with a companion cloud-based recording service, Simplicam offers alerts only if a human face is spotted in-frame, rather than just responding to any sort of movement.

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Google grabs Jetpac team for image recognition smarts

Google grabs Jetpac team for image recognition smarts

Google has snapped up the talent behind Jetpac, the iPhone app which used image recognition to figure out custom city guides based on Instagram photos shared publicly. The news is likely to mean an improvement in Google's use of automatic object tagging, though it's also the end for Jetpac's own app, which the company says will be yanked from the App Store over the next couple of days.

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Roadrage car tech tracks if you’re dangerous

Roadrage car tech tracks if you’re dangerous

Cars that can recognize when drivers are angry or irritated, and warn when emotional states might make them dangerous on the road, are in development in France, using dashboard cameras to track facial expressions associated with roadrage. The technology - which could, researchers suggest, be paired with lip reading AIs that could pick up on times when you cuss out the driver who cuts in front of you - initially reacts to expressions of anger or disgust.

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Smart object-recognition system could spy on your milk in the IoT

Smart object-recognition system could spy on your milk in the IoT

Computers that can identify objects without requiring any human training are now a possibility, as researchers figure out how to teach AIs to intuit the key features and differences between faces, objects, and more. The new algorithm, developed by engineer Dah-Jye Lee of Brigham Young University, avoids human calibration by instead giving computers the skills to learn how to differentiate themselves: so, rather than the operator flagging individual differences between, say, a person and a tree, the computer is given the tools to identify the differences on its own, and then use them moving forward.

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LifeLogger wearable camera spots faces, speech & text: Hands-on

LifeLogger wearable camera spots faces, speech & text: Hands-on

Anybody can clip on a camera and call it a life-logger, but startup LifeLogger says its wearable goes the extra mile with its combination of face, text, and even audio recognition to make reviewing your "augmented memory" more meaningful. Showing at CES 2014 this week, LifeLogger's approach consists of a tiny, gum-packet sized stick camera weighing around 9g and which can record 720/30p HD video as well as stills, and a companion cloud service that does the heavy lifting by processing all that recorded content and allowing you to make better sense of it. We grabbed some hands-on time at the show to find out more.

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K5 security robot resembles a non-weaponized Dalek

K5 security robot resembles a non-weaponized Dalek

Technology start-up Knightscope last week debuted a prototype security robot that looks a lot like a Dalek (of Doctor Who infamy.) The K5 Autonomous Data Machine stands five feet high, rolls around on wheels, can sense a variety of potential security threats through an array of sensors, and can instantly notify the police in the event of an emergency. It was shown at the Plug and Play Winter Expo this week, gaining a top-three mention from a panel of 101 Silicon Valley judges.

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FBI sued over facial-recognition database details

FBI sued over facial-recognition database details

The FBI has been sued by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) for access to its biometrics database, arguing that the US agency has failed to comply with Freedom of Information Act requests and is gathering face-recognition data, among other things, with no external governance. The lawsuit, which follows grudging FBI confirmation that it is deploying drones in the US for surveillance purposes, is the culmination of two years of EFF investigation into the Bureau's developing Next Generation Identification (NGI) database, which includes storing a broad range of biometrics.

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Face-recognition fooling Privacy Visor disguises with light

Face-recognition fooling Privacy Visor disguises with light

Glasses that prevent the wearer from being recognized by face detection software have been demonstrated in Japan, using LED light invisible to the human eye but confusing to monitoring cameras to mask identity. The privacy visor, under development by Isao Echizen's team at the Japanese National Institute of Informatics, works by packing a pair of glasses with eleven near-infrared lights, the positioning of which cancels out the normal characteristics that facial-detection relies upon.

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