FAA

Amazon patent details how drones will find you, talk to each other

Amazon patent details how drones will find you, talk to each other

Like all government agencies, the FAA moves slowly. Drones move quickly, and Amazon wants to strap packages to them for delivery. The well-documented issues pit the pragmatic FAA against the anxious Amazon brass; Amazon wants drones delivering packages yesterday, and the FAA is in no rush to decide how and when drones can be used for commercial use. Most recently, the FAA agreed to reconsider their ‘line of sight’ mandate for flying drones; great news for Amazon. Undeterred, or buoyed by the promise of FAA regulations going their way, Amazon is filing new patents for drone deliveries.

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FAA launches smartphone app B4UFly to answer questions about drones

FAA launches smartphone app B4UFly to answer questions about drones

Most of us see consumer level drones with cameras attached as nothing more than a toy like any other remote controlled airplane. We don’t really think about toys or RC planes needing FAA permission to fly, but for some drones in certain locations, that is exactly what you need. To help people wanting to fly their drone to figure out if it's legal and safe to do so in their area, the FAA has a new app.

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FAA: Boeing 787s need to be rebooted every 248 days uptime

FAA: Boeing 787s need to be rebooted every 248 days uptime

Computer systems, especially servers, usually boast off years of uptime, the number of consecutive days the system is left running without a reboot or shutdown. That's not exactly surprising given how critical it is for these systems to keep on running and running. Boeing's 787 airplane, nicknamed the Dreamliner, however, can't boast of that same achievement anymore. The US Federal Aviation Administration is ordering airlines to shut down a 787's power systems at least once every 248 days to prevent a complete loss of power and control that can happen when the plane is left powered on for long stretches of time.

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FAA reconsidering line of sight requirements on drone regulations

FAA reconsidering line of sight requirements on drone regulations

Good news for companies hoping to move ahead with their vision of deliveries by drone! The FAA has acknowledged that changes need to be made to the "line of sight" requirements, or the rule that states commercial drones must stay with the field of view of the operator during flight. This comes from Jim Williams, head of the FAA's office that oversees drones flying in US airspace, who made the statement at the Drones, Data X conference on Friday.

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FAA grants AIG permission to do inspections with drones

FAA grants AIG permission to do inspections with drones

The FAA has held a tight fist around its drone permissions, and though some have been granted permission for specific activities, the number of permissions given have been relatively small. That doesn't mean the FAA won't grant permission when it sees a reason to, and latest to receive its grace is insurer AIG, which joins USAA and State Farm in the freedom to use drones for conducting inspections. As with past cases, however, there are limitations on how they can be used.

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Amazon slams FAA drone delay with international shaming

Amazon slams FAA drone delay with international shaming

Thought Amazon would be ecstatic the FAA had given it permission to test its Prime Air delivery drones? Think again: Amazon execs have slammed the US government agency, despite finally getting the green-light. The Federal Aviation Administration delivered what it thought was good news last week, telling the online retailer that it could cautiously try flying its remote-control delivery drones in US airspace as a prelude to perhaps one day dropping off packages from the sky. Instead, it opened a can of worms, with Amazon claiming the FAA's tardiness meant it had already scrapped the prototype.

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Amazon drones get FAA test approval (but don’t get excited)

Amazon drones get FAA test approval (but don’t get excited)

Amazon has been granted special permission to test its drone delivery service, but while the FAA may have given PrimeAir trials the green-light, don't expect it at your front door any time soon. PrimeAir was announced in late 2013, Amazon's grand scheme to deliver smaller packages by remotely-controlled drone within thirty minutes of an order being placed, but in addition to doubts around whether the project was practical, the Federal Aviation Administration took a dim view of commercial UAV use. Now, the leash has been loosened a little, allowing Amazon to at least begin conducting feasibility trials.

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FAA says publishing drone footage to YouTube is a no-no

FAA says publishing drone footage to YouTube is a no-no

There are rules in place that allow the average consumer to fly small drones for personal use. Those same rules also stipulate that drones can’t be flown for commercial uses without falling under more strict control by the FAA. The line that separates what is commercial use from what is a private use of a drone aircraft is probably not what most of us thought it was.

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FAA releases proposed rules on drones, remote deliveries not allowed

FAA releases proposed rules on drones, remote deliveries not allowed

The U.S.'s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has just released a set of proposed rules for the use of drones in commercial situations. These regulations have been long-awaited, and were feared to bring strict requirements such as the need for a pilot's license. Thankfully for drone enthusiasts, the rules fairly lenient and not that unreasonable. Unless you're a large business like Amazon hoping to launch a remote package delivery service. Also, nothing changes for recreational users who just like to experiment with unmanned flying machines in their personal time.

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Drone landing at White House may spell doom for consumers

Drone landing at White House may spell doom for consumers

Late last night, a Drone landed on the grounds of The White House. It led to a lockdown of the premises, with a White House spokesperson telling The New York Times that Secret Service agents were looking into it. The President was in no danger (he’s in India), but consumer use of drones is. This incident at the White House is, like many involving drones, likely very innocent. Still, it will probably spark heavy political blowback as the FAA prepares to rule on what we can and can’t do with drones.

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FAA, CNN will partner to use drones for making news

FAA, CNN will partner to use drones for making news

Drones routinely make the news, but are you ready for them to make the news? The FAA and CNN have announced they have reached an agreement meant to allow CNN to explore the merits of drone flight when used in an official capacity. The aim is to create a “framework” (best practices, really) for other networks and entities to use drones for similar purposes. The agreement is purely for research at this point, but the incoming framework suggests the FAA knows drones can’t be stopped; you can only hope to contain them.

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FAA releases drone safety video, website for consumers

FAA releases drone safety video, website for consumers

We’re curious: did you ask for a Drone this year? Are you hoping someone leaves you an ‘unmanned aircraft’ tidily wrapped up? If so, the FAA wants to remind you that they’re in charge, and there are some dos and don’ts on proper Drone ownership. In their newly released video, which you can see below, the FAA passive-aggressively addresses some of the recent events that have brought drones under the microscope. There’s also an accompanying website dedicated to drone ownership, so you have a go-to spot for all your questions.

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