FAA

U-2 spy plane shuts down air traffic control, flights grounded

U-2 spy plane shuts down air traffic control, flights grounded

A U-2 spy plane triggered a computer glitch in the air traffic control system for the entire southwestern portion of the United States, sending air traffic controllers back to the stone age of modern aviation. Air Traffic controllers were forced to use slips of paper and good old-fashioned telephone calls to find information about planes in the air during the blackout.

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First FAA licensed drone site preparing farmer UAS flights

First FAA licensed drone site preparing farmer UAS flights

Real-world tests to see how farmer drones can co-exist with planes and other flying objects have been given the green light to begin. The first drone test site in the FAA's trials of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) has been granted its license, the agency said this week, with a team in North Dakota planning to begin flights in early May as it explores the potential in agriculture as well as how smoothly it can integrate with existing air traffic safety systems.

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Wheel-well stowaway teen sparks skeptics: how did he survive?

Wheel-well stowaway teen sparks skeptics: how did he survive?

It would appear that today’s oddest story isn’t as cut-and-dry as it’s being reported. Sunday, the 20th of April, 2014, a 16-year-old boy is said by the FBI to have jumped over a fence near the San Jose, California airport, found his way into the wheel well of an airplane, and flew aboard a 5-hour flight to Maui. What’s strange - besides the fact that the boy did this at all - is the fact that it’s far more likely that a person would die in such an instance than live.

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US drone trial sites confirmed as FAA tests UAS

US drone trial sites confirmed as FAA tests UAS

Six US teams have been given permission to build and test drones, with the FAA green-lighting several test sites across the country as it figures out how safe, useful, and easy to fly unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) might be. The six sites - University of Alaska, the State of Nevada, New York's Griffiss International Airport, North Dakota Department of Commerce, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, and Virginia Tech - will collectively examine how drones operate in wildly different climates, how they best navigate, how they'll co-exist in the sky with traditional aircraft, how 'smart' they can be made, and what qualifications remote pilots should have.

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FAA regulation issues will put damper on Amazon drone aspirations, says sources

FAA regulation issues will put damper on Amazon drone aspirations, says sources

Jeff Bezos sees a future where Amazon packages are delivered to customers soon after an order is placed with the use of drones -- in this case, with so-called octocopters. Drones have already seen use in other applications, among them being the movie industry where the devices are fixed with cameras and used to record otherwise difficult shots. While the technology exists and varieties of uses for it are cropping up at increasingly rapid rates, there's one big barrier in the way: the FAA.

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