FAA

First FAA licensed drone site preparing farmer UAS flights

First FAA licensed drone site preparing farmer UAS flights

Real-world tests to see how farmer drones can co-exist with planes and other flying objects have been given the green light to begin. The first drone test site in the FAA's trials of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) has been granted its license, the agency said this week, with a team in North Dakota planning to begin flights in early May as it explores the potential in agriculture as well as how smoothly it can integrate with existing air traffic safety systems.

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Wheel-well stowaway teen sparks skeptics: how did he survive?

Wheel-well stowaway teen sparks skeptics: how did he survive?

It would appear that today’s oddest story isn’t as cut-and-dry as it’s being reported. Sunday, the 20th of April, 2014, a 16-year-old boy is said by the FBI to have jumped over a fence near the San Jose, California airport, found his way into the wheel well of an airplane, and flew aboard a 5-hour flight to Maui. What’s strange - besides the fact that the boy did this at all - is the fact that it’s far more likely that a person would die in such an instance than live.

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US drone trial sites confirmed as FAA tests UAS

US drone trial sites confirmed as FAA tests UAS

Six US teams have been given permission to build and test drones, with the FAA green-lighting several test sites across the country as it figures out how safe, useful, and easy to fly unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) might be. The six sites - University of Alaska, the State of Nevada, New York's Griffiss International Airport, North Dakota Department of Commerce, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, and Virginia Tech - will collectively examine how drones operate in wildly different climates, how they best navigate, how they'll co-exist in the sky with traditional aircraft, how 'smart' they can be made, and what qualifications remote pilots should have.

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FAA regulation issues will put damper on Amazon drone aspirations, says sources

FAA regulation issues will put damper on Amazon drone aspirations, says sources

Jeff Bezos sees a future where Amazon packages are delivered to customers soon after an order is placed with the use of drones -- in this case, with so-called octocopters. Drones have already seen use in other applications, among them being the movie industry where the devices are fixed with cameras and used to record otherwise difficult shots. While the technology exists and varieties of uses for it are cropping up at increasingly rapid rates, there's one big barrier in the way: the FAA.

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In-flight call ban lift open to discussion following FCC vote: needs DOT approval

In-flight call ban lift open to discussion following FCC vote: needs DOT approval

Though the vote of 3-2 knocks out a technical ban in the FCC, the rule against using cellphones to make calls in-flight is still being left up to the Department of Transportation to make a final ruling on here near the end of 2013. This week's vote was a close one. The FCC's meeting today had FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler taking special care to note that this vote does not instantly grant travelers the right to make a phone call on their next flight - there's still voting to be done before that's all well and good.

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EASA approves device use at all stages of European flights

EASA approves device use at all stages of European flights

Beginning as early as December of this year, you will soon be allowed to power-on and use approved electronic devices during all stages of the flight on most Europe-based airlines. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) this week issued a ruling to that effect, following a similar ruling by the US's Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) last month. Like the FAA, EASA will allow Wi-Fi enabled devices to be turned on, but not cellular radios.

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Amazon stokes FAA device ruling fire with Kindle blow-out

Amazon stokes FAA device ruling fire with Kindle blow-out

Amazon has decidedly announced their full support of the new FAA ruling for in-flight device use with not only a suggestion that they've always done so, but that they're willing to let their device prices prove it. Amazon Kindle prices have been kicked down a notch for a single day by the company suggesting they're excited their users will be able to read throughout the flight, not just once they've reached 10,000 feet.

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