environment

Gearlike legs propel the plant hopping Issus to nearly 400 G’s

Gearlike legs propel the plant hopping Issus to nearly 400 G’s

For the first time in nature, an insect has been shown to use a set of gears to aid in jumping. Said insect is the Issus coleoptratus and it can be found throughout Europe as well as in parts of the Near East and North Africa. This particular incest is a planthopper found mostly on European climbing ivy and it belongs to the Issidae family. But key for today is the gear-like legs that cause this insect to be a champion jumper.

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Smartphone battery temperatures aid in gathering crowdsourced weather data

Smartphone battery temperatures aid in gathering crowdsourced weather data

With the vast majority of cell phone users out there owning some type of smartphone, whether dated and well-worn or new and running top-line software, crowdsourced data acquired through apps is something that has drawn increasing attention, not the least of which concerns weather. OpenSignal, a startup that had worked with gathering crowdsourced cell reception data, has launched a new weather crowdsourcing app that looks at smartphone battery temperatures.

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Smartphone apps that mimic birds are harmful, says Wildlife Trust

Smartphone apps that mimic birds are harmful, says Wildlife Trust

It is inevitable that technology and decidedly non-technological things will continue to merge as mobile devices and such become more powerful and less expensive. One such way this reality has manifested is birdsong apps, which are apps that play a specific type of bird's song, luring them in for bird watchers or photographers to enjoy. According to the Wildlife Trust of Dorset, this is harmful, and it has issued a warning against it.

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Gadget-eating crazy ants causing millions in damages

Gadget-eating crazy ants causing millions in damages

Depending on what state you live in, there could come a point when one of your electrical devices - maybe even a gadget - fail, only for the culprit to be pegged as "crazy ants". Such has been the case for many in the Southern United States, where a species of insect known as Raspberry crazy ants have made their way from South American, driving out native ant populations and destroying hosts of electronics equipment.

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NASA shows us what Antarctica would look like without ice

NASA shows us what Antarctica would look like without ice

Due to its location, the frigid continent of Antarctica is covered with nothing but ice, making it seem like the continent is nothing but boring flat land. However, thanks to a computer-generated simulation, we get to see that Antarctica is actually bumpy and pretty unique -- it's just that we don't get to see it with all that ice covering it up.

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Scientists alter mosquito genes with “people” blindness

Scientists alter mosquito genes with “people” blindness

Summer is upon many of us, and with it comes mosquitoes. Such tiny creatures are more than a nuisance, serving as disease transmitters of things like malaria. In light of this, researchers undertook a project that could, in part, mitigate such an issue using gene manipulation. Via altering a gene related to the mosquito's ability to smell, the scientists effectively made the insects "blind" to the scent of humans, leaving them to seek out other warm-blooded prey instead.

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Machine prints 33-feet of solar cells per minute

Machine prints 33-feet of solar cells per minute

There's are a variety of alternative sources of energy out there that break away from the traditional, environment-dampening methods used, some of them better tailored to certain locations than others. Solar power is one such source, and Australia is a prime location for such technology, offering many bright and sunny days. One of the biggest problems with solar power has been its cost, which may be changing in the near future thanks to a machine that prints a solar cell every 2 seconds.

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