environment

Philips introduces new 60W LED lightbulb under $5

Philips introduces new 60W LED lightbulb under $5

Philips is releasing what could soon be the cheapest 60 watt equivalent LED lightbulb on the market. There are a plethora of reasons people might want to stick with incandescents over LED lightbulbs, but Philips' newest LED bulb just voided the majority of consumers' biggest concern: cost. At only $4.97 USD, the price of these bulbs is low enough to sway those consumers who have been looking to lower their monthly electric bill but still haven't been convinced by previous LED bulbs on the market.

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Researchers: Antarctic ice shelves melting spiked in the last decade

Researchers: Antarctic ice shelves melting spiked in the last decade

Some researchers have undertaken a big effort to monitor the rate of Antarctic ice selves melting, and what they've found again shows that the ice is melting faster than ever before, particularly in the last decade when a spike in the rate was observed. Such information comes from a recent study detailing work done by a research team headed by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. According to the newly published study, the rate of ice shelf melting in some areas has increased by 18-percent over the past nearly 20 years, and there's no signs of that slowing down.

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Endangered “Magic Rabbit” caught on camera in China after 20 years

Endangered “Magic Rabbit” caught on camera in China after 20 years

The endangered Ili pika ("Magic Rabbit"), a small rabbit with mouse-like ears, has been caught on camera in China for the first time in two decades. The images were published by National Geographic last week, giving a glimpse at the decidedly adorable little mammal as it perched on rocks in the Tianshan Mountains in China. The mammal is commonly described as resembling a teddy bear, due to its rounded ears, and it was first discovered back in 1983 entirely by accident.

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Researchers find shape-shifting frogs in the Andes

Researchers find shape-shifting frogs in the Andes

Researchers have discovered shape-shifting frogs in the Ecuadorian Andes, it has been announced. The frogs are able to change the look of their skin within the span of a few minutes to imitate a surface they are sitting upon, making them what is thought to be the first amphibian discovered with such an ability. The species is called Pristimantis mutabilis, which means "mutable rainfrog", and its shape-shifting revolves around the texture of its skin, which can go from mostly smooth to "high tubercular".

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The Eiffel Tower just installed wind turbines for renewable energy

The Eiffel Tower just installed wind turbines for renewable energy

Paris just made a bold step in reducing its carbon footprint. A New York design company, UGE, just installed a pair of wind turbines in the Eiffel Tower. The Eiffel Tower is one of the most famous historic landmarks in the world, and now it's capable of harnessing clean energy. The quiet twin turbines are nestled above the second level of the tower. Their brushed metal matches the rest of the tower, and they don't obstruct the architecture.

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Gerbils replace rats as historical plague spreaders

Gerbils replace rats as historical plague spreaders

It would appear that our hatred of rats for the past several hundred years may be due to a bit of mistaken identity. Scientists this week have published a paper which suggests that it wasn't so much rats that spread the bubonic plague across the planet, but gerbils. Your best buddy, the gerbil - the one you've got in a plastic tube cage sitting in your living room right now. He may have been guilty this whole time! All these hundreds of years, keeping silent for his ancestors, the real-deal spreaders of plague.

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Animals grow as they evolve: so says science

Animals grow as they evolve: so says science

This week a paper has been published in the journal Science which suggests that the mean size of marine mammals has increased 150-fold in the last 542 million years. It's a massive jump, suggests postdoctoral researcher and co-author of this paper, Noel Heim, suggesting that though it may not seem like a lot when seen between one animal and its closest cousin, it's quite significant. This discovery includes word that increase in body size isn't always due to animal lineages growing bigger, but to the diversification of groups of organisms that are larger, and grow larger than their predecessors early in their line's history.

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NYC Sea Level to rise 6 feet by 2100

NYC Sea Level to rise 6 feet by 2100

According to a paper published by the New York Panel on Climate Change, projections have New York City sea level rising well above the global average for the next 100 years. According to this paper, projections for sea level rise in New York City could reach as high as 6 feet by 2100. Within the next 40 years, sea level rise in New York City could reach 11 to 12 inches. Does that mean you'll be pumping your basement soon? Not so much - but your kids might.

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Limpet teeth: the new World’s Strongest Material

Limpet teeth: the new World’s Strongest Material

So you'd like to know what naturally occurring inorganic material is tougher than spider web, yes? This week Professor Asa Barber of the University of Portsmouth's School of Engineering spoke up on the project. Also leading the project, Barber suggested, "Until now we thought that spider silk was the strongest biological material because of its super-strength and potential applications in everything from bullet-proof vests to computer electronics." Until now, of course. Their new findings suggest that the teeth of the snail-like Limpet is stronger than any material they've found before.

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Life on Earth may be much older than we thought

Life on Earth may be much older than we thought

Before this week, scientists believed that life as we know it began to appear around 2 billion years ago. In a study done over the past year, a group of scientists have discovered evidence that may extend that time period by a whole extra 1.2 billion years. Based on the oldest samples available - rocks 3.2 billion years old - lead author Eva Stüeken and her team have found what they believe to be enough evidence to suggest that life on Earth spans back to 3/4 the age of the planet itself.

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