Encryption

Researchers outline methods of stealing PC encryption keys via radio

Researchers outline methods of stealing PC encryption keys via radio

A group of researchers has outlined several ways that the secret encryption keys from a laptop can be stolen using a radio. For the theft to work the electromagnetic emanations from the notebook are measured non-intrusively using a radio from a distance of 50cm from the computer. According to the researchers, this attack can be carried out using cheap and easy to obtain equipment.

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Dell Venue 8 Lollipop brings the gift of force encrpytion

Dell Venue 8 Lollipop brings the gift of force encrpytion

Early adopters of Dell's RealSense-empowered Dell Venue 8 tablet rejoice! Users are reporting that they are receiving a large update that will bring their tablets into the age of Android Lollipop. But early adopters also beware! Dell is doing something that no OEM has dared to do when upgrading their devices from pre-Lollipop to Lollipop. It seems that Dell has chosen to force data encryption on owners of the device as part of the update process, whether they like it or not. And some will definitely not.

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Crack the code to find 4.87 hidden bitcoins in artist’s image

Crack the code to find 4.87 hidden bitcoins in artist’s image

Artist Marguerite Driscoll has created a fever in the cryptography community as she has launched her latest Bitcoin puzzle in the form of an intriguing mix of art and cryptography. The artist announced via a Twitter update that she released a new cryptographic image hiding a key to 4.87 bitcoins. Her "crypto art" has created a frantic fever of excitement among professional and amateur cryptographers alike. Reddit communities and Bitcoin Talk forums have sprung up as people collaborate, trying to solve these insanely complex cryptographic riddles.

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Confirmed: performance woes back Google off Android encryption

Confirmed: performance woes back Google off Android encryption

Over the past few days, news has surfaced that Google quietly stopped forcing full-disk encryption for Android devices. After loudly thumping their chest about security, Google silently removed the requirement. At the time of discovery, it wasn’t clear why Google would do such a thing. A study found that Android handsets performed much worse when encrypted, so it was believed that was the reason Google had for yanking the encryption. Now, Google has responded, and performance is confirmed as the issue.

 

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Google softens Android full-disk encryption requirement

Google softens Android full-disk encryption requirement

Encryption has become a touchy subject. What was once was, and still is, a standard way to protect data has become controversial in light of recent events. But while most tech companies hailed its privacy and security benefits, few, especially on the mobile device sector, choose to enforce it. It seems that, at least for the time being, the cause has lost one strong proponent. Google has rather quietly revised its Android 5.0 compatibility requirements to let OEMs choose whether to enable full-disk encryption or not.

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Nope, Samsung doesn’t actually encrypt Smart TV voice data

Nope, Samsung doesn’t actually encrypt Smart TV voice data

If Samsung thinks it's already safe from the latest Smart TV scandal, it better put its PR team into action again. The company publicly stated that its Smart TVs were not eavesdropping on users and that it follows security best practices when transmitting voice queries, and only voice queries, to a third-party company for processing. Apparently, for the Korean consumer electronics giant, such "best practices" don't actually include encryption, leaving owners' voice commands, or practically anything they say to the TV, open for hackers to hear.

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Toshiba Encrypted USB Flash Drive includes physical keypad

Toshiba Encrypted USB Flash Drive includes physical keypad

The cloud and micro SD cards make toting data around easy, but sometimes a USB flash drive is the best choice. Protecting sensitive data on a flash drive has largely involved creating an encrypted partition or using an application like USB Safeguard. Toshiba is doing away with all of that via its new Encrypted USB Flash Drive, an ordinary flash drive with one big obvious difference: a physical mini-keyboard on the back. With this keyboard, users can enter their passcode and gain access to their otherwise secured content.

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Kim Dotcom’s MEGAchat promises encrypted video chats in browsers

Kim Dotcom’s MEGAchat promises encrypted video chats in browsers

Recent world events have gotten many tech companies concerned about security and privacy. Some of them have scrambled to add, enhance, or even enforce security measures like encryption while governments and their leaders, like Cameron and now Obama, have scrambled to have them blocked or at the very least weakened. Chat apps and services are one of the common targets and we've seen many old and new ones wave the encryption flag as a major feature. MEGAchat is just one of the latest to join that roster and it comes from a man who should know the situation all too well.

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Obama backs Cameron’s fight against encryption

Obama backs Cameron’s fight against encryption

Flip-flopping somewhat on his earlier stance against putting backdoors in software, US President Barack Obama took UK Prime Minister David Cameron's side in telling tech companies to give government agencies access to encrypted devices and communication. Of course, all in the aid of the fight against terrorism and in the interests of national security. The calls from the world's top government leaders came after two recent incidents that are directly related or being linked to encryption: the hacking of Sony computers last year and the shooting at newspaper Charlie Hebdo this month.

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UK Prime Minister to messaging services: backdoor or get out

UK Prime Minister to messaging services: backdoor or get out

In his bid for re-election, UK Prime Minister David Cameron is threatening to have popular messaging services banned in the country unless a requirement is met. These services, which can be used as a vehicle for any type of communication, legal or otherwise, must provide a backdoor for the government to use or face being banned from the country. It's not exactly a novel or shocking idea but its is probably the boldest and most outright support for such methods from a head of state.

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