Encryption

Viber rolls out encryption for Android, iOS, and desktop

Viber rolls out encryption for Android, iOS, and desktop

Viber, the messaging service that has never quite reached a WhatsApp level of fame, has announced the launch of full end-to-end encryption, following in the footsteps of some other services to better provide users with protection against government spying and more. The feature is available on all devices Viber supports, including Android, iOS, Mac, and PC. The feature is rolling out to users now.

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Microsoft patents end-to-end encryption, but for what?

Microsoft patents end-to-end encryption, but for what?

Microsoft has patented end-to-end security for hardware running verified software. This comes at a time at which encryption and software security is a big, important topic for not only traditional computers, but mobile devices as well. Windows Phone 8.1 has device encryption - but only if you're got your device set up at an enterprise level. Windows Phone 10 (or Windows 10 Mobile, if you prefer) has Device encryption built in for everybody. Just like a real good device manufacturer should mean it to be.

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FBI’s iPhone-cracking trick unlikely to remain secret for long

FBI’s iPhone-cracking trick unlikely to remain secret for long

The ongoing battle between Apple and the FBI over bypassing an iPhone's security during a criminal investigation took an interesting turn last week, when the government abruptly dropped its court appointment, saying it had found another method to get inside the iPhone 5c at the middle of San Bernardino terrorism case. Unfortunately for the FBI, this new trick for bypassing Apple's encryption is unlikely to remain a secret for long.

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Petya ransomware targets entire drives, not just files

Petya ransomware targets entire drives, not just files

Ransomware is quickly becoming the new darling among hackers looking to make a quick buck. Although it doesn't exactly jump from one infected computer to another, given how it works, it is actually more destructive and possibly more profitable than a common trojan or virus. We've seen recently what is probably the worst ransomware out in the wild. Now we're being told there's a potentially more destructive one as well. Called Petya, the ransomware tries to encrypt your entire hard drive for maximum damage and maximum profit.

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Apple makes encryption stand: “we will not shrink” insists Cook

Apple makes encryption stand: “we will not shrink” insists Cook

Today at the Apple Town Hall meeting, CEO Tim Cook took the stage after showing off a brief history of the company. They showed 40 years of the company in 40 seconds, which was little more than a quick flash of words such as "Lisa" "1984" "iMac" and more. After letting us know that Apple's 40th birthday was coming up on April 1st, he took a moment to talk about something far more important.

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Encrypted ProtonMail opens service to public, mobile apps ready

Encrypted ProtonMail opens service to public, mobile apps ready

The fight between Apple and the Justice Department over the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone has once again put the spotlight on security, privacy, and encryption. The last time that was a hot topic was nearly 3 years ago at the height of the "Snowden Files". Born out of that very same controversy, Swiss encrypted email provider ProtonMail has seen it fit to finally open up its service to the general public, removing the invite-only barricade for individuals and groups to sign up for an end-to-end encrypted secure e-mail service.

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Apple amps up the rhetoric in latest response to DOJ

Apple amps up the rhetoric in latest response to DOJ

Apple has just filed a legal response to the Justice Department's response to Apple's response to the court order on behalf of the Justice Department. That simplified yet still confusing chronology of legal filings only shows the circus surrounding the tussle between Apple and government agencies, specifically the FBI, over unlocking the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone. After being on the receiving end of some colorful remarks from the DOJ, Apple's latest legal statement fires back by saying how the Founding Fathers would be appalled by the DOJ's order.

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Google webpage encryption made transparent

Google webpage encryption made transparent

This week Google has opened up a new section in their ever-changing, ever-updating Transparency Report for the public. In this new section, google delivers encryption for the masses. Not that they hadn't been moving toward encryption and data security in all things public before - now it's just that they're making more of an effort to show you, the user, how they're doing in their move to HTTPS. This new Transparency Report section is called - appropriately enough - HTTPS at Google.

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WhatsApp tipped to launch encrypted voice calls soon

WhatsApp tipped to launch encrypted voice calls soon

In light of Apple’s ongoing legal battle with the FBI, other tech companies are looking to boost their own encryption, according to sources. Among them is WhatsApp, which is said to be prepping an encrypted voice calls rollout, adding to its other encrypted features. As well, Snapchat is said to be working on a secure messaging platform, and Google is looking into putting its encrypted email technology to use elsewhere.

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Apple FBI case simplified by John Oliver Encryption video

Apple FBI case simplified by John Oliver Encryption video

If you weren't already convinced one way or the other about the Apple FBI encryption case, today "Last Week Tonight" will do that job for you. John Oliver tackles encryption, showing how the situation has played out so far and how absurd everything has been. In this Last Week Tonight, like all Last Week Tonight episodes, Oliver not only takes the case and makes it all simple enough for any person to understand, he drops the mic at the end as well.

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New quantum computer could mean trouble for encryption

New quantum computer could mean trouble for encryption

The FBI and the Justice Department might still be at an impasse with Apple, but technology could give it the break it needs in a distant future. In a paper published in the Journal Science, researchers from MIT and Austria's University of Innsbruck have revealed that they were able to not only design but also build a quantum computer that only needs five atoms to factor the number 15. But equally important is the claim that the design is completely scalable, allowing for the addition of more atoms to factor numbers of much larger magnitudes.

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Amazon Fire tablet encryption to return as retailer backtracks

Amazon Fire tablet encryption to return as retailer backtracks

Amazon has backtracked on Fire tablet encryption, having triggered an outpouring of criticism after removing support in the latest Fire OS 5 release. The retail giant blamed minimal customer interest for the decision, which saw Android's data encryption option stripped from the Fire tablet platform, though communications with Amazon's own servers were still secured.

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