EFF

EFF fights to keep jailbreaking legal, petitions US Copyright Office

EFF fights to keep jailbreaking legal, petitions US Copyright Office

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is continuing to make its best efforts at ensuring the act of jailbreaking devices like smartphones and tablets remains a legal act. The organization said this week that it has filed a petition with the U.S. Librarian of Congress and the Copyright Office, arguing that jailbreaking is not a crime, and that it should not be seen as a violation of the U.S.'s Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA).

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Android sends WiFi location history when screen is off

Android sends WiFi location history when screen is off

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has discovered what could be a serious privacy leak in most recent Android device. According to them, smartphones and tablets running Android 3.1 or later whose screens are turned off are broadcasting their previous WiFi connection history to anyone within WiFi range willing to listen, leaving the user vulnerable to future attacks.

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GoDaddy censors Mexican protest site

GoDaddy censors Mexican protest site

GoDaddy is one of the larger web hosts out there today and hosts hoards of websites in the US and abroad. The company has reportedly censored a Mexican website that was protesting the inauguration of Mexico's new president Enrique Pena Nieto. The censored website was at the domain 1dmx.org.

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Obama talks NSA: EFF, Julian Assange, White House respond

Obama talks NSA: EFF, Julian Assange, White House respond

Just this morning, United States President Barack Obama spoke up at a bit of NSA news, letting it be known what his real NSA reform plan would be. As is often the case, some of the responses to the talk have appeared more telling than the talk itself. We're having a peek at what the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Julian Assange (of WikiLeaks), and the White House have done to follow up this set of announcements.

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FBI sued over facial-recognition database details

FBI sued over facial-recognition database details

The FBI has been sued by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) for access to its biometrics database, arguing that the US agency has failed to comply with Freedom of Information Act requests and is gathering face-recognition data, among other things, with no external governance. The lawsuit, which follows grudging FBI confirmation that it is deploying drones in the US for surveillance purposes, is the culmination of two years of EFF investigation into the Bureau's developing Next Generation Identification (NGI) database, which includes storing a broad range of biometrics.

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EFF lays out NSA data collection issues with demand for investigation

EFF lays out NSA data collection issues with demand for investigation

Two new top-secret documents related to PRISM and NSA data collection were published yesterday by The Guardian. Detailed within the documents are various stipulations and requirements related to the data collection as it relates to US persons. On the surface, such information is mildly reassuring, but a thoughtful examination illuminates several red-flag issues, which the EFF has highlighted with a demand for an independent investigation into the matter.

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EFF, Mozilla, Reddit send open letter to Congress over NSA spying

EFF, Mozilla, Reddit send open letter to Congress over NSA spying

The National Security Agency has been on thin ice with the general public lately when whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed that the US government was spying on American citizens by secretly recording phone calls and tracking users' online activity with the alleged help from big internet companies like Google and Facebook. Because of this, 86 civil liberties groups have banded together to urge Congress to put an end to NSA spying.

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Google’s new search policy leaves free Internet advocates worried

Google’s new search policy leaves free Internet advocates worried

Yesterday, Google announced that it will begin using copyright takedown notices to influence where sites show up in search results. The general idea behind it is that if a site has a lot of takedown notices (made under DMCA), it risks being demoted in search rankings. Obviously, this new decision has won the hearts of copyright advocates like the MPAA and the RIAA, but it's making those who would keep the Internet free and open a little uneasy.

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