editorial

Is the Technology World Too ‘Pop Culture’?

Is the Technology World Too ‘Pop Culture’?

As many of you who read my work here on SlashGear know, I’m an avid technology lover. My entire life has been dedicated to learning about technology, leveraging the tools that work best, and educating others on the value of it. From a young age, I was building my own PCs and taking apart products to see how they worked. It wasn’t long that I realized that having some sort of career in this fascinating world was a good idea.

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Is Apple Doubt Starting to Creep In?

Is Apple Doubt Starting to Creep In?

Apple is a rather fascinating company when one examines not the products that it has developed but the way in which it’s viewed in the public. For years now, Apple has been considered the dominant, unbeatable force in the technology industry, and there have been few people – if any – that have actually believed that the company could do anything but succeed beyond all expectation.

Lately, though, some things have changed. Apple, once the most Teflon of companies in the technology world, is starting to create some doubt in the minds of supporters. While the company might still be generating billions of dollars and its sales are still strong, there’s some concern that the future might not be as bright as the past.

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Is every phone the Facebook phone?

Is every phone the Facebook phone?

Facebook may refuse to deliver what the rumor-mill wants - an own-brand smartphone to take on the iPhone - but that's not to say it isn't following a cuckoo-style mobile strategy, progressively infesting handsets from other vendors. The company's new free voice calling service, quietly revealed in the aftermath of the Facebook Graph Search announcement, is the latest in a growing suite of mobile products that, while lacking the eye-catching appeal of a glossy slab of hardware, nonetheless shows that the social network finally has a mobile strategy.

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Why CES Is A Necessary Evil

Why CES Is A Necessary Evil

The Consumer Electronics Show is boring; it’s too big; and for the most part, few companies are able to get their products into the spotlight for long enough to actually impress many customers.

And yet, CES is a necessary evil. Like it or not, the show is what the industry needs to ensure that the average non-Apple company can actually get some attention in a world dominated by the iPhone maker.

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The Irrelevance of Ultra HD

The Irrelevance of Ultra HD

CES is about the future of consumer electronics; I get that. We go to see what's going to make our eyes light up later in the year. But take a glance at our CES 2013 Hub and it's clear that Ultra HD was the tech most of the big companies were pushing, and it's arguably the most irrelevant theme to the electronics industry - for the near future, at least - we've seen in some years. Not since the very earliest days of 3D have we seen a segment so desperate to validate its own existence, and failing so miserably.

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Why Motion Gaming Should Be Left Out of the PlayStation 4

Why Motion Gaming Should Be Left Out of the PlayStation 4

At the end of February, Sony will be holding a special PlayStation event that, industry experts believe, will be used to show off its next console. Likely dubbed the PlayStation 4, the console is expected to come with an improved online experience, better graphics, and Blu-ray. And since the PlayStation 3 comes with the Move motion-gaming accessory, it’s believed that the console will also integrate a similar function in some way.

But I’m here to tell Sony something. I can appreciate that the company wants to jump on the motion bandwagon made popular by the Wii and arguably better by the Kinect, but bundling such a feature into the PlayStation 4 makes absolutely no sense.

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Why the Used Game Model Needs Fixing (But Not Banning)

Why the Used Game Model Needs Fixing (But Not Banning)

With the recent unveiling of a Sony patent application indicating the company was thinking of killing off used games in the PlayStation 4, speculation has run rampant over how such a tool would affect the games industry. There seems to be a general sense that the implementation of such a product would potentially ruin GameStop, and would benefit game makers. Used games, some say, are bad news.

The reality is, used games aren’t really all that bad. In fact, there’s a good chance that the continued growth of used games is helping the industry in an immense way.

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I expected Apple to jump on Leap Motion first, not ASUS

I expected Apple to jump on Leap Motion first, not ASUS

If you can judge a technology's wow-factor by how much it's accused of being vaporware, Leap Motion's gesture-tracking was a hit from the off; companies jumped on the idea, though it's perhaps a surprise that the first should be ASUS, not Apple. The matchbox-sized gadget - which can track the movement of ten fingers individually, and 200x more accurately than kit like Microsoft's Kinect - will soon be integrated into Windows 8 PCs from ASUS, according to a new deal announced today. Microsoft's OS certainly loves fingers, but Apple's moves to blend the best of OS X and iOS arguably make it and Leap Motion more obvious bedfellows.

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My Hope for 2013: Some Small Company Successes

My Hope for 2013: Some Small Company Successes

I’m fed up with the technology industry. As great as some products are from companies like Apple, Samsung, Sony, and Microsoft, there are countless devices and services in the wild that come from no-name firms that have been ignored.

There was a time in the technology industry that it didn’t matter how much a company had in its marketing budget. If a company’s products were really great, they would be discovered by the tech addicts out there, and then eventually shared with the rest of the world. It was our job as tech lovers to find the good stuff and tell the “average consumer” why they needed something special.

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