editorial

Why Motion Gaming Should Be Left Out of the PlayStation 4

Why Motion Gaming Should Be Left Out of the PlayStation 4

At the end of February, Sony will be holding a special PlayStation event that, industry experts believe, will be used to show off its next console. Likely dubbed the PlayStation 4, the console is expected to come with an improved online experience, better graphics, and Blu-ray. And since the PlayStation 3 comes with the Move motion-gaming accessory, it’s believed that the console will also integrate a similar function in some way.

But I’m here to tell Sony something. I can appreciate that the company wants to jump on the motion bandwagon made popular by the Wii and arguably better by the Kinect, but bundling such a feature into the PlayStation 4 makes absolutely no sense.

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Why the Used Game Model Needs Fixing (But Not Banning)

Why the Used Game Model Needs Fixing (But Not Banning)

With the recent unveiling of a Sony patent application indicating the company was thinking of killing off used games in the PlayStation 4, speculation has run rampant over how such a tool would affect the games industry. There seems to be a general sense that the implementation of such a product would potentially ruin GameStop, and would benefit game makers. Used games, some say, are bad news.

The reality is, used games aren’t really all that bad. In fact, there’s a good chance that the continued growth of used games is helping the industry in an immense way.

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I expected Apple to jump on Leap Motion first, not ASUS

I expected Apple to jump on Leap Motion first, not ASUS

If you can judge a technology's wow-factor by how much it's accused of being vaporware, Leap Motion's gesture-tracking was a hit from the off; companies jumped on the idea, though it's perhaps a surprise that the first should be ASUS, not Apple. The matchbox-sized gadget - which can track the movement of ten fingers individually, and 200x more accurately than kit like Microsoft's Kinect - will soon be integrated into Windows 8 PCs from ASUS, according to a new deal announced today. Microsoft's OS certainly loves fingers, but Apple's moves to blend the best of OS X and iOS arguably make it and Leap Motion more obvious bedfellows.

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My Hope for 2013: Some Small Company Successes

My Hope for 2013: Some Small Company Successes

I’m fed up with the technology industry. As great as some products are from companies like Apple, Samsung, Sony, and Microsoft, there are countless devices and services in the wild that come from no-name firms that have been ignored.

There was a time in the technology industry that it didn’t matter how much a company had in its marketing budget. If a company’s products were really great, they would be discovered by the tech addicts out there, and then eventually shared with the rest of the world. It was our job as tech lovers to find the good stuff and tell the “average consumer” why they needed something special.

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Which Console Maker Will Win the Next-Generation Battle?

Which Console Maker Will Win the Next-Generation Battle?

The Nintendo Wii U has kicked off a new generation of consoles. The device, which comes with HD graphics that can about match those we have from the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, will likely be joined by vastly more powerful PlayStation 4 and Xbox 720 consoles at some point in the next year or so.

Once those devices launch, it will be time to handicap the marketplace. Which console will succeed? Which console will fail? And perhaps most importantly, which console will win the next-generation battle?

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How Popular Is the Wii U, Really?

How Popular Is the Wii U, Really?

I have a Wii U. And although I find its motion implementation quite fun at times, and the addition of a second screen a good idea, I haven’t played it at all in the last couple of weeks.

I decided to conduct an informal poll with other people I know who also own a Wii U. I asked them if they’ve been playing with the console much since its launch. Nearly every person said that they played it somewhat heavily in the first week after launch, but little after that.

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Sorry Facebook, a 10 second Poke just isn’t enough

Sorry Facebook, a 10 second Poke just isn’t enough

Facebook's new Poke app - borrowing the name of its "remember me?" digital jab to the ribs, but the functionality of "sexting" app Snapchat - is an interesting start, but ten seconds sells it short. The headline grabbing purpose of flaunting your undercarriage (and the one to which Facebook coyly and obliquely refers to with a reminder that you can report anything you're uncomfortable with) will undoubtedly get plenty of use from teenagers and cheating spouses, but with some timer tweaking Poke could become a legitimately useful "Getting Things Done" style tool.

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Instagram took the lazy, sneaky way out

Instagram took the lazy, sneaky way out

Congratulations, internet: your often-ugly filtered photos are safe. Instagram's decision to backtrack on its contentious Terms of Service changes have rolled back the clock to how things used to be, the halcyon days of another usage policy you didn't actually bother reading. Maybe it's a victory for a vocal user-base, but it also seems a missed opportunity for a legitimately useful change in how our rights are expressed in an age where the cloud has become all-pervasive.

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Amid Instagram Madness, What Terms of Use Should Take for Granted

Amid Instagram Madness, What Terms of Use Should Take for Granted

In all the hubbub around the new Instagram Terms of Service, there is one refrain that keeps repeating. It’s one I’ve heard plenty of times before, and it’s the reason I was hesitant to even tackle this issue. I see plenty of pundits saying that I must be an idiot if I did not read the original Terms of Use. I should always read the Terms of Use. What was I expecting? These policies have always already been spelled out in the Terms of Use.

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