eBook

Amazon, Hachette settle their dispute

Amazon, Hachette settle their dispute

Suddenly, and without much of the fanfare the actual dispute had, Amazon and Hachette have settled their differences. The two companies announced Thursday morning they’ve signed a new multi-year contract which will (naturally) see Hachette-published books on Amazon. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed, but both parties were complimentary of the agreement. In Amazon’s original complaint, they said their aim was to keep eBook pricing low. In announcing the deal, Amazon executive David Naggar noted “financial incentives” for Hachette to deliver on low-priced eBooks.

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Scribd Audiobooks: expanding beyond Amazon

Scribd Audiobooks: expanding beyond Amazon

The team behind Scribd want to make their service as accessible as possible. To do this, they've seen it necessary to expand beyond the Kindle - to move past the Amazon environment. To do this, they've decided, they'll need to open their platform to Audiobooks. According to Scribd, this $1 billion a year market is just ripe for expansion - 30,000 audiobooks are on the way to their service right this minute. This will be the single largest unlimited-access offering of e-books and audiobooks available in the world today.

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Amazon tipped in multi-year ebook deal with Simon & Schuster

Amazon tipped in multi-year ebook deal with Simon & Schuster

Amazon's negotiations with publishing companies don't often go smoothly (nor has it always gone smoothly with videos), something that has been demonstrated by the months of tussles between it and Hachette. At the heart of the matter are ebooks, and Amazon's desire to price them low -- something it has hailed as a benefit to authors, using numbers to back up its claims. Though the battle with Hachette is still ongoing, sources have cropped up saying it has struck a deal with Simon and Schuster.

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Kindle Voyage Review: Ereader Royalty

Kindle Voyage Review: Ereader Royalty

The ebook didn’t kill the paperback, and Amazon is counting on the fact that not only hasn’t the tablet killed the ereader, but that there’s still room for a premium model in the shape of the Kindle Voyage. Fronted by an incredible e-paper display, Amazon’s smartest screen illumination system to-date, and a bevy of software enhancements focused on readers, it’s certainly shaping up to be a great home for your digital 50 Shades. In a world of free Kindle apps and $249 iPads, however, the Kindle Voyage needs to do more than just pack in the pixels in order to justify its existence.

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Adobe Digital Editions caught calling home with user logs

Adobe Digital Editions caught calling home with user logs

Home and mobile users might be more familiar with Adobe's Acrobat software for reading PDFs, but those who live on ebooks, particular in the EPUB format, also live in another program called Adobe Digital Editions or ADE. Popular (relatively) and widespread, this program has just been discovered to have one frightening flaw. Apparently, ADE transmits the app's activity logs to Adobe's servers, presumably for copyright protection purposes, but also seemingly includes unnecessary user data. Worse, it transmits them in a manner that can be easily read by unauthorized snooping third parties.

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Google, Barnes & Noble will now bring you books on the fly

Google, Barnes & Noble will now bring you books on the fly

If you live in one of three major metropolitan areas of the US, and just happen to be an avid reader, we’ve got great news for you. Google is partnering with Barnes & Noble to bring you same-day book delivery. Those of us in Manhattan, West Los Angeles, and San Francisco (all of SF, it seems) can now start reading minutes or hours after placing an order.

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