eBook

Oyster launches eBook store to take you beyond subscriptions

Oyster launches eBook store to take you beyond subscriptions

Those who like to read digitally have likely heard of Oyster, the monthly subscription service geared towards avid readers. At $9.99/month, getting the most out of Oyster is easy if you read one or more books monthly. If you don’t, you might have wondered why you’re subscribing — why not just buy books as needed? It’s a crossroads many have found themselves at, but you no longer have to leave Oyster if you’re not interested in subscribing. Today, Oyster is launching an eBook marketplace, where you can buy digital copies of books.

Continue Reading

Kobo Glo HD wants to speed Kindle Voyage’s final journey

Kobo Glo HD wants to speed Kindle Voyage’s final journey

Kobo is looking to spank Amazon where it hurts, launching the Kobo Glo HD ereader with the same e-paper display as the Kindle Voyage, but dramatically undercutting it on price. Set to hit shelves from May 1st, the Glo HD uses E Ink's 300dpi Carta panel, just as the Voyage does, for smooth text and monochrome images. However, whereas the Voyage will set you back upwards of $199.99 depending on whether you mind Amazon subsidizing it by showing you adverts, Kobo will be asking just $129.99 for the Glo HD.

Continue Reading

Idea to App book review; first base for iOS app creation

Idea to App book review; first base for iOS app creation

Building an app starts with a concept, and idea, a vision. If you don’t have a guiding light in mind, you’re just doing. That isn’t necessarily creating. Idea to App: The Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Making iOS Apps is a new book from Megan Holstein, who is also responsible for the website of the same name. Her book promises not to be a rehashing of the website, though; it’s billed as one that is full of fresh ideas, and a better walk-through of how to get from idea to app. To see if it accomplishes that, I decided to give it a read.

Continue Reading

Kindle Convert turns your scans into proper ebooks

Kindle Convert turns your scans into proper ebooks

During that magical transition period from physical music discs to digital files, you likely bought your first MP3 player and then stared down the massive pile of CDs filling your bookcase. Thus came the long process of ripping your physical media so that you could use it on the newest piece of technological marvel, and all was well in your world. We're seeing that same kind of transitioning happening with books, with many beholding their slim Kindle and likewise eyeballing all those heavy books lying around, but merging the two together isn't quite as simple.

Continue Reading

Kindle Unlimited subscribers buy more books, says Nielsen

Kindle Unlimited subscribers buy more books, says Nielsen

Last summer, Amazon introduced its Kindle Unlimited subscription ebook service, something that gives users access to hundreds of thousands of books for a flat rate via their Kindle. The benefits are obvious, and those who consumer a lot of books in a month will find it helps cut down on the monthly budget. As with many other services, Amazon hasn't been open about its statistics on the subscription option, but Nielsen has stepped in to fill that void, dropping some numbers to give an idea of how the service is used.

Continue Reading

Amazon, Hachette settle their dispute

Amazon, Hachette settle their dispute

Suddenly, and without much of the fanfare the actual dispute had, Amazon and Hachette have settled their differences. The two companies announced Thursday morning they’ve signed a new multi-year contract which will (naturally) see Hachette-published books on Amazon. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed, but both parties were complimentary of the agreement. In Amazon’s original complaint, they said their aim was to keep eBook pricing low. In announcing the deal, Amazon executive David Naggar noted “financial incentives” for Hachette to deliver on low-priced eBooks.

Continue Reading

Scribd Audiobooks: expanding beyond Amazon

Scribd Audiobooks: expanding beyond Amazon

The team behind Scribd want to make their service as accessible as possible. To do this, they've seen it necessary to expand beyond the Kindle - to move past the Amazon environment. To do this, they've decided, they'll need to open their platform to Audiobooks. According to Scribd, this $1 billion a year market is just ripe for expansion - 30,000 audiobooks are on the way to their service right this minute. This will be the single largest unlimited-access offering of e-books and audiobooks available in the world today.

Continue Reading

Amazon tipped in multi-year ebook deal with Simon & Schuster

Amazon tipped in multi-year ebook deal with Simon & Schuster

Amazon's negotiations with publishing companies don't often go smoothly (nor has it always gone smoothly with videos), something that has been demonstrated by the months of tussles between it and Hachette. At the heart of the matter are ebooks, and Amazon's desire to price them low -- something it has hailed as a benefit to authors, using numbers to back up its claims. Though the battle with Hachette is still ongoing, sources have cropped up saying it has struck a deal with Simon and Schuster.

Continue Reading

Kindle Voyage Review: Ereader Royalty

Kindle Voyage Review: Ereader Royalty

The ebook didn’t kill the paperback, and Amazon is counting on the fact that not only hasn’t the tablet killed the ereader, but that there’s still room for a premium model in the shape of the Kindle Voyage. Fronted by an incredible e-paper display, Amazon’s smartest screen illumination system to-date, and a bevy of software enhancements focused on readers, it’s certainly shaping up to be a great home for your digital 50 Shades. In a world of free Kindle apps and $249 iPads, however, the Kindle Voyage needs to do more than just pack in the pixels in order to justify its existence.

Continue Reading

Adobe Digital Editions caught calling home with user logs

Adobe Digital Editions caught calling home with user logs

Home and mobile users might be more familiar with Adobe's Acrobat software for reading PDFs, but those who live on ebooks, particular in the EPUB format, also live in another program called Adobe Digital Editions or ADE. Popular (relatively) and widespread, this program has just been discovered to have one frightening flaw. Apparently, ADE transmits the app's activity logs to Adobe's servers, presumably for copyright protection purposes, but also seemingly includes unnecessary user data. Worse, it transmits them in a manner that can be easily read by unauthorized snooping third parties.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next