DRM

Advocacy group threatens legal action over Diablo III always-on DRM

Advocacy group threatens legal action over Diablo III always-on DRM

Diablo III has attracted a healthy amount of controversy since launch, with most of that controversy focused around the game's always-online requirement. Blizzard's announcement of the always-on DRM was met with considerable outcry from fans, and it caused plenty of problems on launch day, as Blizzard's Diablo III servers repeatedly crumbled under the stress of so many logins. It was enough to send any gamer into a rage, and now a German consumer advocacy group called the Federation of Consumer Organizations is looking to do something about it.

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iOS app DRM error rectified by Apple

iOS app DRM error rectified by Apple

This week there was a bit of chatter on the fact that a "small number of users" as Apple put it were affected by an issue in the iTunes app store - today Apple has a fix. This issue included several apps crashing intermittently after they'd been updated, but today's update straight from Apple's iTunes representatives notes that all is well once more and that every app that's been crashing should simply be able to be updated or re-downloaded from iTunes for a fully operational version, no worries included.

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Fox, Warner, SanDisk, and Western Digital announce new ‘Project Phenix’ DRM

Fox, Warner, SanDisk, and Western Digital announce new ‘Project Phenix’ DRM

Twentieth Century Fox and Warner Bros. studios along with storage device makers SanDisk and Western Digital have teamed up to announce a new "Project Phenix" (intentionally mispelled) initiative that's aimed at making high-definition digital movie content available across multiple devices. The new digital rights management (DRM) standard is the brainchild of the Secure Content Storage Association (SCSA) and is being developed to be compatible with UltraViolet so that users can download movie content from the cloud as well as transfer it via compliant storage devices to be played on approved TVs, tablets or other media players.

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Gog.com brings Square Enix games to downloadable catalog

Gog.com brings Square Enix games to downloadable catalog

Gog.com has struck a new deal with Square Enix to bring some of the most iconic games of a generation to its digital download platform. It is one of the biggest scores yet for the nascent online PC game store. Gog, whose slogan is "Good Old Games," will begin with Deus Ex and Hitman, and promises more of Square Enix's incredibly heralded games will be added to the list in the coming weeks.


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DRM gets creative as Serious Sam attacks pirates with pink scorpion

DRM gets creative as Serious Sam attacks pirates with pink scorpion

Game DRM can be annoyingly complex, so mild as to be ineffectual, or, as in Serious Sam 3 BFE, it can be a giant, invincible pink scorpion that refuses to leave pirate gamers alone. Those attempting to play with cracked copies of the first-person shooter will discover that, while they're able to attempt the first level, their challenge will be a whole lot trickier than those with legitimate copies thanks to an immortal pink arachnid determined to kill them, The Dark Side of Gaming reports.

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1080p Netflix on Android imminent says TI after OMAP4 certification

1080p Netflix on Android imminent says TI after OMAP4 certification

Netflix streaming at full HD 1080p resolution on Android mobile devices could be with us imminently, with the news that Texas Instruments' OMAP4 platform has become the first to be Netflix HD certified. OMAP4's combination of 1080p-capable dual ARM Cortex-A9 cores and the M-Shield security technology were apparently enough to convince Netflix that not only was the platform good enough to deliver Full HD, but in a way that would stop nefarious users from ripping the high-def clips and sharing them illegally.

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Nintendo 3DS DRM License Too Extreme?

Nintendo 3DS DRM License Too Extreme?

In the wake of the Sony PlayStation Network debacle and the earlier Sony vs. GeoHot saga, you would think that Nintendo would have learned something from its competitor's mistakes. Instead, the Nintendo 3DS is now facing a major campaign against its absurdly restrictive DRM.

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Netflix and Linux Don’t Play Well Together

Netflix and Linux Don’t Play Well Together

I just signed up for Netflix for the first time. I know, I'm way past the freshmeat boat on that one, but I never wanted it for anything until last week. Much to my chagrin, I went to instant-play and found that Linux wasn't a supported operating system. Most of the time these days, when a website says such a thing it's not really that big of a deal. There's often some kind of "do it anyway" link to click on. After spending a couple of minutes looking for such an option, I didn't find it. I turned to the interweb to see if anyone else had run into this issue and to see if there were some workarounds available. I started doing a little digging and found out about this sordid story involving Microsoft's Silverlight, Novell's open source Moonlight, and Digital Rights Management.

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Boxee Netflix delayed again: DRM to blame?

Boxee Netflix delayed again: DRM to blame?

The promised Boxee Netflix app - which the streaming media company had previously said would be released by the end of January - is once again delayed. According to the Boxee blog, the Netflix app works but has "not yet satisfied Netflix’s security requirements."

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Apple pulls VLC from App Store over open-source DRM dispute

Apple pulls VLC from App Store over open-source DRM dispute

VLC was a surprise addition to the App Store back in September, but one which iPad and iPhone users quickly came to appreciate. Now the multi-format media player has been yanked from the store, the result of incompatibilities with Apple's App Store DRM policies and the terms of the GNU General Public License on which VLC is based.

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Potential Solution for Windows Phone 7 DRM Crack in the Works

Potential Solution for Windows Phone 7 DRM Crack in the Works

A couple of days ago, we reported that, thanks to a proof-of-concept video, it was more than evident the security behind the applications on Microsoft Windows Phone 7 Marketplace's isn' the best in the world. Or even close. Through a simple crack, anyone could easily strip the Digital Rights Management (DRM) tools in place, and download a paid application from the Marketplace, and install it on any Windows Phone 7 device they wanted. And while the conversation towards illegal downloads could have easily exploded, in which case Microsoft would have had an ever-worsening case on their hands, it looks like it's taken a different turn. The developer behind FreeMarketplace, the tool needed to crack the DRM on applications, has actually turned his knowledge over and has begun trying to figure out a solution for the problem.

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Windows Phone 7 DRM for Apps Cracked with Proof of Concept Program [Video]

Windows Phone 7 DRM for Apps Cracked with Proof of Concept Program [Video]

Security is an important aspect of anything that gets used by anyone, at any given moment around the world. For developers of applications that get purchased through a digital storefront, like Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 Marketplace, making sure that it's not easy, next to impossible in fact, to steal apps and put them on a device free-of-charge is just as important. But, as WPCentral reports, it looks like the Digital Rights Management (DRM) security tools set in place by Microsoft have been cracked.

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