DRM

Netflix and Linux Don’t Play Well Together

Netflix and Linux Don’t Play Well Together

I just signed up for Netflix for the first time. I know, I'm way past the freshmeat boat on that one, but I never wanted it for anything until last week. Much to my chagrin, I went to instant-play and found that Linux wasn't a supported operating system. Most of the time these days, when a website says such a thing it's not really that big of a deal. There's often some kind of "do it anyway" link to click on. After spending a couple of minutes looking for such an option, I didn't find it. I turned to the interweb to see if anyone else had run into this issue and to see if there were some workarounds available. I started doing a little digging and found out about this sordid story involving Microsoft's Silverlight, Novell's open source Moonlight, and Digital Rights Management.

Continue Reading

Potential Solution for Windows Phone 7 DRM Crack in the Works

Potential Solution for Windows Phone 7 DRM Crack in the Works

A couple of days ago, we reported that, thanks to a proof-of-concept video, it was more than evident the security behind the applications on Microsoft Windows Phone 7 Marketplace's isn' the best in the world. Or even close. Through a simple crack, anyone could easily strip the Digital Rights Management (DRM) tools in place, and download a paid application from the Marketplace, and install it on any Windows Phone 7 device they wanted. And while the conversation towards illegal downloads could have easily exploded, in which case Microsoft would have had an ever-worsening case on their hands, it looks like it's taken a different turn. The developer behind FreeMarketplace, the tool needed to crack the DRM on applications, has actually turned his knowledge over and has begun trying to figure out a solution for the problem.

Continue Reading

Windows Phone 7 DRM for Apps Cracked with Proof of Concept Program [Video]

Windows Phone 7 DRM for Apps Cracked with Proof of Concept Program [Video]

Security is an important aspect of anything that gets used by anyone, at any given moment around the world. For developers of applications that get purchased through a digital storefront, like Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 Marketplace, making sure that it's not easy, next to impossible in fact, to steal apps and put them on a device free-of-charge is just as important. But, as WPCentral reports, it looks like the Digital Rights Management (DRM) security tools set in place by Microsoft have been cracked.

Continue Reading

Apple close iOS rental transfer loophole with new iTunes T&Cs

Apple close iOS rental transfer loophole with new iTunes T&Cs

Apple has tightened its iTunes rental T&Cs, removing a loop-hole that allowed TV shows to be transferred between the iPad and other iOS devices.  The new agreement, paidContent spotted, now refers to generic "content" rather than differentiating between movies and TV shows, and basically means that anything rented from your iPhone, iPod touch, Apple TV or iPad is now only available on that device.

Continue Reading

Apple HDTV rumors resurface as Apple secure digital TV IP

Apple HDTV rumors resurface as Apple secure digital TV IP

Apple has quietly licensed IP belonging to digital content protection and media information specialists Rovi, according to a document filed by the company, prompting analyst speculation that the Cupertino firm is still working on an HDTV with integrated Apple TV.  Rovi is responsible for much of the program guide and copy protection technology used in cable set-top boxes and online media portals, and in recent years has been buying up entertainment metadata firms such as Muze and All Media Guide.

Continue Reading

HDCP cracked confirms Intel: piracy chips predicted

HDCP cracked confirms Intel: piracy chips predicted

Intel has confirmed that the supposed HDCP master key - which can be used to unlock the anti-copy protection used on Blu-ray and other media - is legitimate, with company spokesman Tom Waldrop saying that he expects a DRM decoding chip to be the next challenge facing the content production industry.  "We have tested this published material," Waldrop told PCMag, "[and] it does produce product keys ... the net of that means that it is a circumvention of the code."

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6 7