DRM

Ubisoft speaks on DRM disaster

Ubisoft speaks on DRM disaster

Yesterday, Ubisoft made headlines when it was discovered that its UPlay service had a pretty big security hole that could allow malicious websites to access users' computers. The good news is that Ubisoft has issued a patch for the issue (and managed to do that rather quickly), but the bad news is just starting for the French publisher, which is already on thin ice with PC players thanks to its fondness of always-on DRM. Indeed, this security issue wouldn't been as big of a problem if Ubisoft didn't require players to run UPlay alongside many of its games, including most Assassin's Creed titles and a few games in the Tom Clancy franchise.

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Major security vulnerability discovered in Ubisoft UPlay DRM

Major security vulnerability discovered in Ubisoft UPlay DRM

It's already pretty easy to hate Ubisoft's UPlay DRM, which requires PC gamers to remain connected to the Internet at all times while playing, but today hating it got a whole lot easier. As it turns out, the UPlay client has a pretty major security vulnerability that could allow malicious websites to take control of your computer. The problem stems from the browser plugin that is installed by the UPlay launcher - instead of only granting access to UPlay, the plugin could potentially give a wide range of websites privileged access to your computer.

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Advocacy group threatens legal action over Diablo III always-on DRM

Advocacy group threatens legal action over Diablo III always-on DRM

Diablo III has attracted a healthy amount of controversy since launch, with most of that controversy focused around the game's always-online requirement. Blizzard's announcement of the always-on DRM was met with considerable outcry from fans, and it caused plenty of problems on launch day, as Blizzard's Diablo III servers repeatedly crumbled under the stress of so many logins. It was enough to send any gamer into a rage, and now a German consumer advocacy group called the Federation of Consumer Organizations is looking to do something about it.

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iOS app DRM error rectified by Apple

iOS app DRM error rectified by Apple

This week there was a bit of chatter on the fact that a "small number of users" as Apple put it were affected by an issue in the iTunes app store - today Apple has a fix. This issue included several apps crashing intermittently after they'd been updated, but today's update straight from Apple's iTunes representatives notes that all is well once more and that every app that's been crashing should simply be able to be updated or re-downloaded from iTunes for a fully operational version, no worries included.

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Fox, Warner, SanDisk, and Western Digital announce new ‘Project Phenix’ DRM

Fox, Warner, SanDisk, and Western Digital announce new ‘Project Phenix’ DRM

Twentieth Century Fox and Warner Bros. studios along with storage device makers SanDisk and Western Digital have teamed up to announce a new "Project Phenix" (intentionally mispelled) initiative that's aimed at making high-definition digital movie content available across multiple devices. The new digital rights management (DRM) standard is the brainchild of the Secure Content Storage Association (SCSA) and is being developed to be compatible with UltraViolet so that users can download movie content from the cloud as well as transfer it via compliant storage devices to be played on approved TVs, tablets or other media players.

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Gog.com brings Square Enix games to downloadable catalog

Gog.com brings Square Enix games to downloadable catalog

Gog.com has struck a new deal with Square Enix to bring some of the most iconic games of a generation to its digital download platform. It is one of the biggest scores yet for the nascent online PC game store. Gog, whose slogan is "Good Old Games," will begin with Deus Ex and Hitman, and promises more of Square Enix's incredibly heralded games will be added to the list in the coming weeks.


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DRM gets creative as Serious Sam attacks pirates with pink scorpion

DRM gets creative as Serious Sam attacks pirates with pink scorpion

Game DRM can be annoyingly complex, so mild as to be ineffectual, or, as in Serious Sam 3 BFE, it can be a giant, invincible pink scorpion that refuses to leave pirate gamers alone. Those attempting to play with cracked copies of the first-person shooter will discover that, while they're able to attempt the first level, their challenge will be a whole lot trickier than those with legitimate copies thanks to an immortal pink arachnid determined to kill them, The Dark Side of Gaming reports.

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1080p Netflix on Android imminent says TI after OMAP4 certification

1080p Netflix on Android imminent says TI after OMAP4 certification

Netflix streaming at full HD 1080p resolution on Android mobile devices could be with us imminently, with the news that Texas Instruments' OMAP4 platform has become the first to be Netflix HD certified. OMAP4's combination of 1080p-capable dual ARM Cortex-A9 cores and the M-Shield security technology were apparently enough to convince Netflix that not only was the platform good enough to deliver Full HD, but in a way that would stop nefarious users from ripping the high-def clips and sharing them illegally.

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Netflix and Linux Don’t Play Well Together

Netflix and Linux Don’t Play Well Together

I just signed up for Netflix for the first time. I know, I'm way past the freshmeat boat on that one, but I never wanted it for anything until last week. Much to my chagrin, I went to instant-play and found that Linux wasn't a supported operating system. Most of the time these days, when a website says such a thing it's not really that big of a deal. There's often some kind of "do it anyway" link to click on. After spending a couple of minutes looking for such an option, I didn't find it. I turned to the interweb to see if anyone else had run into this issue and to see if there were some workarounds available. I started doing a little digging and found out about this sordid story involving Microsoft's Silverlight, Novell's open source Moonlight, and Digital Rights Management.

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