dinosaur

Dinosaur footprints found strolling a German beach together

Dinosaur footprints found strolling a German beach together

Biologists uncover dinosaur tracks in formation with one another, suggesting carnivores walked amongst one another. What these ca. 50 footprints suggest, say biologist Pernille Venø Troelsen, is that these prints could have belonged to "two social animals, perhaps a parent and a young." These tracks were first revealed to the public back at this year's XIII Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Paleontologists in Opole, Poland. It was there that Troelsen first showed the prints excavated between 2009-11 in a Bückeberg Formation in Münchehagen in Germany.

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T-Rex’s serrated, folded teeth used like near-unbreakable knives

T-Rex’s serrated, folded teeth used like near-unbreakable knives

Theropod dinosaurs like the Tyrannosaurus Rex have been known to have serrated teeth for some time - today it's apparent why. A study has been published this week by lead author Kirstin Brink, a postdoctoral researcher of biology at the University of Toronto Mississauga, which shows how theropod teeth aren't just shaped the way they are to keep them from breaking under pressure, they're made to tear apart flesh the same way our modern knives are today. This awesome feature allows dinosaurs who have it to rip into meaty flesh from birth.

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Dinosaur discovered: see this fluffy poodle dragon with wings

Dinosaur discovered: see this fluffy poodle dragon with wings

Today scientists have reported finding a dinosaur that's unlike any they've found before. University of Edinburgh paleontologist Steve Brusatte called this dinosaur a "fluffy feathered poodle from hell." This creature was discovered in Zhenyuan County in Gansu, China. "Zhenyuanlong" means dragon of Zhenyuan - though it doesn't look like any of the wide variety of mythical flying beasts we're used to seeing. This dinosaur looks more like a chicken. A chicken with velociraptor claws and teeth in what eventually evolved into a beak.

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While dinosaurs didn’t rule the ancient tropics, alligators did

While dinosaurs didn’t rule the ancient tropics, alligators did

University of Utah paleontologist Randall Irmis and his colleagues have discovered some of the reasons why dinosaurs avoided the ancient tropics. It's partially because they just did not like the weather. You like what you're used to, after all. These researchers suggest that while dinosaurs did not enjoy the dry, hot landscape, other creatures roamed relatively freely. This included the armored aetosaurs and long-snouted phytosaurs you see in the image above. The latter is of the family that eventually gave rise to what we know today as alligators and crocodiles.

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Scientists break dinosaur bones, find red blood cells

Scientists break dinosaur bones, find red blood cells

Dinosaur bones in London contain traces of what appear to be red blood cells and collagen. These scientists have pulled up results from dinosaur bones they'd only otherwise called "crap" - bones so fragmented and shotty they'd been put into storage. Because of this, material scientist Sergio Bertazzo asked paleontologist Susannah Maidment (both of them from Imperial College in London) whether the bones might be OK to break open and study. One morning Bertazzo "turned on the microscope... and thought 'wait - that looks like blood!'"

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Hellboy, the newly-named dinosaur “out of left field”

Hellboy, the newly-named dinosaur “out of left field”

Today the Regaliceratops dinosaur, nicknamed "Hellboy" by its discoverer, is revealed to the scientific community. Described today in the science journal Current Biology, Royal Tyrrell Museum paleontologists Caleb Brown and Donald Henderson tell of a discovery made - almost by accident - on the shores of the Oldman River in Alberta, Canada back in 2005. Regaliceratops is one of a wide array of dinosaurs that - at first glance - might remind you of the very famous dinosaur triceratops. In fact it's similar, but not the same.

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New ‘Chilesaurus’ therapod was an adorable vegetarian

New ‘Chilesaurus’ therapod was an adorable vegetarian

Researchers have added a new Jurassic dinosaur to the roster of known dinosaurs, and it was discovered back in 2004 by a 7-year-old boy. The boy and his parents were on a hike in Southern Chile when the boy — Diego Suarez — found a couple bones, which his parents identified as belonging to a dinosaur. It has been a long while since then, but a lot of progress has been made and that dinosaur now has a name: Chilesaurus diegosuarezi. The most interesting discovery is that despite being a theropod, the dinosaur preferred to eat plants rather than other animals.

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Little boy finds big dinosaur fossil under future mall

Little boy finds big dinosaur fossil under future mall

The son of a zookeeper, Wylie Brys, discovered no less than a 100-million year old dinosaur bone whilst digging in the dirt this past September. The report is coming out now because between September 2014 and now, April of 2015, preparations have been underway to excavate and remove the fossil. Excavation took place over the past two days and the bone - or bones, as it turned out - were removed just today. The finding began back in September when Brys and his father were digging for fish bones in the area where a mall was set to be built.

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Brontosaurus is back! (in 60 years or so)

Brontosaurus is back! (in 60 years or so)

This week there's word going round that Brontosaurus is back. In fact, though, the name is only back according to one study. One study does not make the entire scientific community change its mind. The timeline you'll see below shows when the Brontosaurus was first discovered, when the name Brontosaurus was retired, and how long it took for the entire scientific community to accept the realities therein. It's not as simple as most news stories on this subject this week would have you believe.

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Brontosaurus is back from the dead (in name at least)

Brontosaurus is back from the dead (in name at least)

Back when you were a kid and you were first learning about dinosaurs - almost no matter what age you are today - you probably learned about a dinosaur named Brontosaurus. As one of the first dinosaurs to be reconstructed with fossil fragments and shown to the public as a quintessential "thunder lizard," Brontosaurus remained a popular name for a certain kind of long dinosaur for many years after it was formally retired. In 1903, paleontologist Elmer Riggs suggested that traits that separated the Brontosaurus and the Apatosaurus suggested that the former was just a shorter or younger version of the latter. This week that changes.

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Jurrasic World for real: new “dragon” dinosaur turns up in China

Jurrasic World for real: new “dragon” dinosaur turns up in China

At 15-meters long, Qijianglong (pronounced “CHI-jyang-lon") was not a small dinosaur. Half of its length was made up of neck, while a tiny head sat on one end and a four-legged hulk of a body sat at the other. The digging site at which this animal was found was first discovered in 2006, and only now have paleontologists gotten to a point where they're comfortable confirming the new species, long neck and head included. This creature is from the mamenchisaurids family and the sauropodomorpha (sauropod) suborder - long necked, plant-eating dinosaurs found all around the world.

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Dinosaurs may have survived if not for “colossal bad luck”

Dinosaurs may have survived if not for “colossal bad luck”

Dinosaurs may have survived had the asteroid that struck Earth been off by just a few million years, scientists now claim, with "colossal bad luck" blamed for their extinction. The six mile wide space rock struck the planet arrived at just the wrong time, researchers at the University of Edinburgh say, combining with existing environmental changes on Earth that added up to dinosaur disaster.

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