data

T-Mobile subscribers can now roam for free in Canada, Mexico

T-Mobile subscribers can now roam for free in Canada, Mexico

Today T-Mobile announced its new Mobile without Borders feature, which allows its Simple Choice customers to get coverage in Mexico and Canada without any extra charges. This means subscribers who are traveling in Canada or Mexico will be able to access 4G LTE data, as well as make and receive calls and send and receive text messages. Says the wireless carrier, with this upgrade the Simple Choice plan becomes the only wireless subscription option that spans an entire continent.

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NY Stock Exchange shuts down for 3 hours due to “technical issue”

NY Stock Exchange shuts down for 3 hours due to “technical issue”

The New York Stock Exchange shuts down entirely as a "technical issue" bogs the system. While it's been suggested by the NYSE that this is not due to any sort of malicious attack, no definitive answer has yet been given for what the technical bug could be. Word from the chairwoman of the Securities and Exchange Commission Mary Jo White says "We are in contact with N.Y.S.E. and are closely monitoring the situation and trading in N.Y.S.E.-listed stocks." This is the second of two issues today, the first having been announced as resolved at 9:37 AM Eastern Standard Time.

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Republic Wireless upsets subscribers with new data plans

Republic Wireless upsets subscribers with new data plans

Republic Wireless has decided it was time to do away with unlimited data, and instead go with a new refund-based data setup where users buy the amount of data they think they need and then either pay more if they go over or get a refund for unused data at the end of the month. The new arrangement hurts for those who took full advantage of the unlimited data arrangement, but for users with more modest data demands it will still prove more budget-friendly than alternatives on some of the bigger name wireless carriers.

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Understanding Facebook’s data lasers

Understanding Facebook’s data lasers

This week Mark Zuckerberg showed off several photographs of lasers he suggested would be sending internet signals all around the world. These lasers will be used with Facebook's Internet.org project, beaming information "from a plane flying overhead or a satellite flying way overhead," according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. "They'll communicate down to earth using very accurate lasers to transfer data." This isn't the first experiment in the world to use lasers to send data. In fact several organizations - like the ESA and NASA - have already begun real-world testing for data transfer between craft in space and labs on our planet's surface. Data transfer with lasers is super reliable and fast, too!

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Google sheds some light on its data center network tech

Google sheds some light on its data center network tech

More than any other tech company in the world, Google's business revolves around the shuffling of gargantuan amounts of data across almost innumerable data centers. Given the nature and demands of such complex networks, Google really had very little choice but to embrace distributed computing. Unfortunately for Google, back when it started, data center network technology, both hardware and software, wasn't yet at a level that it could use to meet its requirements. So like any enterprising Silicon Valley company, it made its own.

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AT&T “vigorously disputes” FCC fine

AT&T “vigorously disputes” FCC fine

AT&T sends a response to the FCC regarding a $100 million dollar fine for throttling Unlimited Data users on their network. FCC Enforcement Bureau Chief Travis LeBlanc made clear earlier today that "the Commission is committed to holding accountable those broadband providers who fail to be fully transparent about data limits." AT&T has responded with a statement which suggests they will fight back against the FCC in this matter "vigorously", going on to say that they've gone above and beyond the FCC's requirements in this matter, informing consumers of their data speed limits when they have Unlimited Data allowances more than the FCC required.

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AT&T throttling “unlimited data” users taps $100m FCC fine [UPDATE with statement]

AT&T throttling “unlimited data” users taps $100m FCC fine [UPDATE with statement]

Mobile phone carrier AT&T has been fined $100 million for their slowing of data speeds on users of "unlimited data" plans. At this point in time "unlimited data" is no longer a service you can purchase from AT&T, it's only a grandfathered service. AT&T has been clear about wanting to get rid of it altogether - they've effectively done so save the small number of unlimited data users left grandfathered in today. Today it's become clear that their efforts to cut unlimited data speeds is not going to be taken lightly by the FCC.

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Opera Max now monitors Wi-Fi usage, block data-hungry apps

Opera Max now monitors Wi-Fi usage, block data-hungry apps

Opera is a name you might more readily associate with mobile browsers, but in late 2013 it tried to diverge a bit from that core business. Focusing on one of its key strengths, which is compressing Internet data before it arrives on your device, it launched the Opera Max service that brings that feature to cover not just web pages, but more kinds of data. In the latest iteration of its Android app, it brings two new features to the fold: watching Wi-Fi data usage and shutting down obstinate apps.

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Microsoft consortium to install new undersea cables between US, UK, and Asia

Microsoft consortium to install new undersea cables between US, UK, and Asia

Microsoft has announced that it is shelling out some big money to run some new undersea cables to connect data centers in North America with data centers in Ireland. The software giant also has plans to lay undersea cables to connect networks in Asia as well. Reports indicate that Microsoft has been making big investments in undersea cabling over the last few months.

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Appeals court rules NSA surveillance program illegal

Appeals court rules NSA surveillance program illegal

In March, the ACLU filed a lawsuit against the NSA, claiming their surveillance program was overreaching and illegal. Today, a Federal Court of Appeals has agreed with that assertion, finding the NSA’s practice of data collection “exceeds the scope of what Congress has authorized”. This decision comes well after Edward Snowden began leaking documentation highlighting just how deep and intrusive the NSA’s domestic surveillance program is. In the ruling, Circuit Judge Gerald Lynch wrote “such an expansive concept of 'relevance' is unprecedented and unwarranted”.

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