Data Security

Google webpage encryption made transparent

Google webpage encryption made transparent

This week Google has opened up a new section in their ever-changing, ever-updating Transparency Report for the public. In this new section, google delivers encryption for the masses. Not that they hadn't been moving toward encryption and data security in all things public before - now it's just that they're making more of an effort to show you, the user, how they're doing in their move to HTTPS. This new Transparency Report section is called - appropriately enough - HTTPS at Google.

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Catching up on Apple FBI case: an 8-point timeline

Catching up on Apple FBI case: an 8-point timeline

Today we're rounding up all the details regarding Apple's legal battle with the FBI over iPhone encryption. This includes the one-sentence filing made by attorneys representing Apple this week notifying the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California that their clients "formally object" to an order to break in to an encrypted iPhone. Today we make it simple. Today we catch you up at the same time as we collect the data in one place for ourselves, as well.

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Kingston DataTraveler 2000 Review – Encryption made simple

Kingston DataTraveler 2000 Review – Encryption made simple

Data security and privacy is a pretty hot topic right now. Currently Apple is battling it out with the FBI over whether or not they have to unlock an iPhone. It's nice to know that (at least for now) the data on your phone is relatively safe, if you've added a passcode to it. But not everything important that you carry with you is on your phone. What if you need to carry sensitive information on a flash drive? For that, you need something special, like Kingston's DataTraveler 2000, which I've been using for a little while now.

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Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

This afternoon the FBI and Apple spoke before a congressional panel regarding iPhone encryption. This case has to do with unlocking a singe iPhone, says the FBI, one owned by a San Bernardino shooter. After a New York Magistrate Judge (James Orenstein) ruled against the FBI on compelling Apple to unlock this iPhone, the FBI and Apple went to congress to continue to speak on the issue. Apple's arguments have been straightforward. The FBI's arguments have stacked with fear mongering statements aplenty.

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FBI denies Apple case will set precedent

FBI denies Apple case will set precedent

Apple's contends that the FBI's San Bernardino case will have them unlock many phones in the future - the FBI does not agree. FBI Director James Comey spoke with a congressional panel this Thursday, suggesting that Apple's assistance in unlocking the phone of one San Bernardino shooter would not open the doors to future unlocking of devices as such. This situation, he said, was "unlikely to be a trailblazer" for other cases. Apparently Comey had not spoken to the NYPD before the panel.

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NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

The New York City Police Department says they'd like Apple to unlock every iPhone currently subject to a court-ordered search. Once the San Bernardino doors are broken down by the FBI, the NYPD has made clear: they want in, too. That'd mean every iPhone entered into evidence in a court case and subjected to a search ordered by a judge could be forced open by law enforcement, courtesy of a piece of software they've forced Apple to create. That software would be an entirely new version of iOS which the FBI (then the NYPD, and every other law enforcement agency in the USA) would then install on each iPhone, bypassing Apple's security measures, opening the locks to access data. You might be asking yourself, "why is that so bad?"

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Microsoft makes modest statement in support of Apple over iPhone encryption

Microsoft makes modest statement in support of Apple over iPhone encryption

The news about the FBI ordering Apple to offer backdoor access to an iPhone belonging to a terrorist, along with Apple's subsequent refusal, has been dominating headlines this week. On an issue that's sure to prompt ongoing debate about encryption and privacy, several other tech giants are voicing their support for Apple's stance. It took a bit of time, but Google's Sundar Pichai tweeted his agreement with Tim Cook's open letter on encryption, along with Jan Koum, the founder of WhatsApp. Now Microsoft has spoken up, albeit in a moderate way.

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Instagram two-factor authentication roll out begins

Instagram two-factor authentication roll out begins

Instagram has been around for a long time now and has grown from a small time operation to one of the largest social networks out there. Instagram boasts 400 million users and so far hasn't offered much in the way of security for users other than a simple password. Instagram is fixing the lack of security with confirmation that two-factor authentication is now rolling out.

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UK teen arrested over FBI, DHS data hacking

UK teen arrested over FBI, DHS data hacking

Following the news earlier this week about data on some 30,000 FBI and Department of Homeland Security employees being stolen and subsequently posted online, a suspect has already been taken into custody, authorities have revealed. In what's not all that surprising, as it's become common in many of the high-profile corporate and government hacking incidents recently, the suspect is a 15-year-old boy, this time found living in England.

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How to avoid the new Netflix viruses and malware

How to avoid the new Netflix viruses and malware

Netflix scams are on the rise, so say the security crews at Tripwire and Symantec. How do you avoid such malware? How does your grandmother avoid downloading a virus? The answers are relatively simple, and they begin with sticking to the course. That is, not clicking on any advertisements that promise lower costs and coupons for Netflix-based deals on subscriptions. That's where this newest wave of internet evil is coming from - let your uncle know what's up.

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Google adds an encryption lock to Gmail

Google adds an encryption lock to Gmail

Google initiates an unlocked/broken lock icon system in Gmail in honor of Safer Internet Day, showing whether or not emails are encrypted or not. Gmail email has been encrypted for some time. Not all other email services share this level of protection. Google's initiative - starting today - shows a tiny un-locked icon to the right of your "to" or "from" bar in any given email. This broken or unlocked lock indicates whether or not the person on the other end of your email works with a service that supports TLS encryption.

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LastPass phishing attempts leave users’ passwords vulnerable

LastPass phishing attempts leave users’ passwords vulnerable

There seems to be an alarming trend happening recently. Namely, that the very programs we're using to keep our information safe are actually giving hackers easy access to our private data in bulk. The latest in the string of hacked security programs is LastPass.

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