Data Security

Google says thousands of pics were deleted in wake of celeb hacking scandal

Google says thousands of pics were deleted in wake of celeb hacking scandal

In the aftermath of a large hacking attack that saw the personal photos of many celebrities released on the internet earlier this year, Google has now come forward saying that "tens of thousands" of said images were removed from the search giant's services promptly after requests were made. This disclosure comes almost immediately after Google was threatened with a $100 million lawsuit from lawyers representing the celebrities who had their pictures stolen.

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Chase bank says 76 million affected in data breach

Chase bank says 76 million affected in data breach

Data breaches seem to be a daily occurrence of late, with companies left and right reporting they’ve been hacked. The latest puts the info grab a little too close to home, though, as JP Morgan Chase reveal they’ve been compromised. The scope of the breach makes it the largest we’ve ever seen.

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Lawyer wants to sue Google over celeb photo hack

Lawyer wants to sue Google over celeb photo hack

With the recent celebrity photo hacking scandal, iCloud was quickly pointed to as a reason for us seeing far too much of those affected. Apple was quick to respond by pointing out the breach occurred by brute force, and not as a result of their lax security. Now, a lawyer representing some of the celebrities affected, is suing Google.

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SALT offers security, ‘keyless’ phone entry

SALT offers security, ‘keyless’ phone entry

If you’re not using a pass code or other method to lock your phone, several entities will tell you that you’re doing something wrong. If you feel your smartphone needs to be a bit more secure, but don’t want the fuss of having to unlock it each time you use it, a new Kickstarter might be just your thing. SALT offers to let you protect your device, or just certain apps you don’t want people getting into, and all you have to do is carry a card.

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First Chinese iOS Trojan Xsser mRAT targets Hong Kong activists

First Chinese iOS Trojan Xsser mRAT targets Hong Kong activists

Protesters and activists these days have flocked to social media and mobile technology to circumvent censorship and blockades that prevent their message from reaching other people. But now the tables might have been turned on them. A new trojan malware called Xsser mRAT that infects iOS as well as Android devices has been discovered to be of Chinese origin and is seemingly targeting Hong Kong's Occupy Central movement.

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Study shows we’ll give up our children for free WiFi

Study shows we’ll give up our children for free WiFi

When you’re logging into a public WiFi hotspot, do you read the terms and conditions? Probably not, but you’re not alone. While it’s not clear what percentage of people aren’t reading the fine print, quite a few Britons in London recently gave up their first-born child for free WiFi, all because they didn’t read the T&C when logging in.

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FBI: Apple, Google data encryption goes too far

FBI: Apple, Google data encryption goes too far

The FBI isn’t too happy with Apple right now. They’re lumping Google in for good measure, too. Director James Comey says he is “very concerned” about the encryption methods Apple and Google use for their devices. Not because they are too weak, but because they are beyond his reach.

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Google to implement encryption by default in Android L

Google to implement encryption by default in Android L

Following Apple's privacy policy statement yesterday, Google is reported to be coming out with a similar hard-line stance in its next Android release. Devices that will be running the upcoming Android L, sometimes called Android 5.0 or Lemon Meringue Pie, will have their phone's data encrypted and password-protected by default, which would hinder both authorities and miscreants alike from gathering users' private data.

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